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WILTSHIRE 
INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 
HENRY III — EDWARD II. 



ISSUED BY 

Cbe TBritisb IRecorU ^ocietp, iLimitcD. 

[XXXVI I.] 



'{/' 7 "^^^ Index Library, 



ABSTRACTS 

OF 

WILTSHIRE 

Jn<|ui0ihone0 (|)o0^ (TUor^etn, 

KETURNED INTO THE COURT OF CHANCERY IN THE REIGNS OF 

HENRY III, EDWARD I, and EDWARD II. 

A.D. I242-I326. 



EDITED BY 

EDW. ALEX. FRY. 



Eonton : 

ISSUED TO THE SUBSCRIBERS BY THE 

BRITISH RECORD SOCIETY, LIMITED 



1908. 



KRAUS REPRINT 

Nendeln/Lieditenstein 

1968 



Reprinted from a copy in the collections of the 
University of Illinois Libra'^' 



Reproduced by permission of the original publishers 

KRAUS REPRINT 

a Division of 

KRAUS-TH0M50N ORGANIZATION LIMITED 

Nendeln /Liechtenstein 

1968 



Printed in Germany 
Lessingdruckerei in Wiesbaden 

THE LIBRARY 

BRIGHAM YGUNC UKIVERSITY 
ppnvn UTAH 



INTRODUCTION. 

The present volume contains the Inquisitiones post mortem from 
the time they commenced to be taken, about 27 Henry III, to the 
end of Edward II, viz. a.d. 1242 to 1326. The abstracts are 
given in full, and were trajislated by the late Miss Emma Walford, 
who finished the reign of Edward II only a very short time previous 
to her death. 

The Introduction to the last volume of Inquisitions gave full 
particulars of what those documents consisted and their value to 
genealogists, historians, and others. In these earlier ones there 
is greater diversity of customs, tenures, and services, and amongst 
the last may be noted (page 60) the holding of certain lands by 
the service of being doorkeepers of the King in his hall ; (page 92) 
the manor of Inglesham was held by the serjeanty of keeping one 
hoe {hostorium) — or it may have been an instrument used for 
levelling a measure of corn. On page 93 is mentioned that the 
rent of a certain manse was a garland of rosfs, to be delivered 
on the feast of St. John the Baptist. 

We get glimpses of the actual state of repair in which certain 
houses were ; that of the manor house of Clarendon (page 89), 
for instance, was in a most ruinous condition. 

There are also many extents of manors, and several perambu- 
lations and proofs of age, all which are very interesting as showing 
the conditions under which our ancestors were accustomed to live. 

With the next instalment of Inquisitions will commence the 
long reign of Edward III. 

The Indices Locorum and Nominum have been the work of 
Mr. Edward Kite and Mr. E. A. Fry respectively, the former 
1 * 



vi INTRODUCTION. 

having been at considerable pains in identifying the various 
manors and places mentioned. 

It is, perhaps, desirable, to mention that the whole of the 
Inquisitiones post mortem are under revision by the Public Record 
Office authorities, and the old references used herein have been 
completely changed. In the Calendar printed by the P.R.O. in 
1904 is a Table giving both the Old and the New references. 

E. A. FRY. 



CORRECTIONS. 

Page 4. Add to the Inquisition of Gunnora de la Mare :— 

The Oxford Inquisition states that Henry, son and 
heir of Henry Tracy, is the nearest heir to Gunnora de 
la Mare, by reason that Henry Tracy was uncle of the 
said Gunnora, and was aged 13 at Pentecost, 4th June, 
35 Henry III, 1251. 

For Geydon read Heydon. 

For Mantravers read Mautravers. 

Insert John (probably) before Giffard. 

Insert after John, [Grim]stede. 

For Petesbury read Yatesbury. 

For Patesbur' read Yatesbury. 

For Clureham read Chippenham. 

In Inquisition of Ernisius de Nevill, insert by 

before Richard de Berneford. 
For Nenton read Neuton. 
For Chawrtes read Chawrces. 
Delete what iS in the brackets and the footnote 
and read [The Extents of Lavington and 
Berewyk are too defaced to be legible.] 
27. Add to Patricius de Cadurcis :— 

The following knights' fees are held of the manor of 
Kenemerford, co. Gloucester: — 

William de Radene holds one knight's fee in Radene, 
in CO. Wilts, of the said manor. 

The heirs of John de Aure hold half a knight's fee 
in Cheldrington, in the said county, of the said manor. 

Simon de Scheveral holds one knight's fee m 
Herdenehywys and Yatton, in said county, of said manor. 
Henry de Scheynell holds one knight's fee at Eston, 
in said county, of said manor. 

Standene half a knight's fee of said manor, which 
is now in demesne. 
29, line 5 from bottom. For Richard read Ralph de Hayres. 
,31, ,, 12. Y ox templars xQ2Ldi Templars. 



4. 


line 


19. 


5. 


»» 


14. 


S> 


)« 


19. 


5. 


>» 


l^- 


8, 


»» 


30- 


9. 


i> 


3- 


ID, 


» 


33- 


21, 


»> 


2. 


22, 


)> 


9 


22, 
22. 


»» 
1 1 


20 
22 



Page 36, 


line 24. 


,. 36, 


„ 28. 


.. 37. 


., J- 



Viii CORRECTIONS. 

William le Brut is probably William le Brito. 
For Lungespeke read Lungesptye. 
The Parva Fakeham inquisition of Baldwin de 
Insula belongs to Suffolk. The Extents of 
Worth, Stratton, and Sevenhampton, all co. 
Wilts, should have been given instead. 
40, ,, 30. Chepinggavel need not have been in such large 

type, it only means ' market rents.' 
42, „ 12. For Stinentun read Stiventun (Steventon, CO. 

Berks). 
42. The heading ofthe Extent of the Manor of Chiriel should 
be John son of John, and in the first line of 
the extent Cyrie should he Cyriel. 

47, line 18. " Zow^espeye" should be in one word, all in 
italics. 

48, ,, 20. William de Albiniaco was son (not brother) and 
heir of Nigel. 

51, ,, 4. /c^r Mandiut r^ar/ Mauduit. 

53, ,, 6. /(jr Dunstanirl r^-a^ Dunstanivilla. 

53, ,, 19. /l>r Sterle rifa(/ Sterte. 

53, ,, 23. F(7r William ri?a(/ Walter. 

56, last line, reference. For 36 read 56 Henry III. 

58, line 14. The second "or not" is superfluous. 

59, ,, 18. /or Sethehavene r^a^ Nethehavon. 

61, ,, 3. /Ijr Alnedeston r^a^ Alvcdeston. 
61 and 62. Beneger, repeated several times, is a variant of 

Berenger. 

62. Under the heading "Sir Philip Basset" should be inserted 
" Manor of Compton Basset," and on page 63, 
between lines 15 and 16, should be inserted 
" Manor of Berewyk." 

65. The heading of this Inquisition should be "Sir Philip 

Basset, manor of Brodeton." 
68. Under the heading " William de Cantelupe " insert 
" Manor of Calne," and between lines 1 1 and 
12 from bottom insert " Manor of Caleston." 
71, line 7. For Tvi// read vt7L 
94, lines 21 and 23. For he read she. 
106, line 7. /br Boneworth riea*/ Doneworth, 
114, ,, 21. /or Cocele rifad/ Cotele. 
114, ,, 24. /'br Bandeham rif^i^ Baudeharn. 
132, ,, 16. /T>r Rynle r^<7^ Kyule (Keevil). 



CORRECTIONS. 



IX 



Page 137, line 4. For "Elenche read C\enche. 

151, ,, I. /br Wulnemcre r<?a«/ Wuluemere. 

15s, ,, 15. /c;r Cladewiz rifflff Chadewiz (Chaddenwich). 

158, ,, 18. For Kyneleygh read Kyve\eyp;h {Keevil). 

158, ,, 26. For Kynd read Kyve\ (KeevW). 

'9S» ». 3- /^^r Maculm r^a</ Maculin. 

210, lines 2 and 4 from bottom. For Hereford read Hertford. 

399, ,, I and 9. /'^r Vinonia r^<7^/ Vivonia. 

400, line 8. For Vinonia read Vivonia. 
407, „ 26. The comma after Robert should be after 

Pagan. 
423, ,, 15. Henry Huse should be in italics. 



CONTENTS. 



The first numbers in four figures are the dates of the Inquisitions. 



Lands of those who adhered to the 
adversaries of the King (Henry III) 
in the Hundred of Swanebergh, 

1264, 46. 

Abbadam, John, 1299, 240. 
Albiniaco, Henry de, 1278, 120. 
Albiniaco, Walter de, 1 268, 47. 
Ambresbury, Prioress of, 1299, 238, 

239; 1301, 284 ; 1317,417. 
Amundevyl, Matilda, wife of Richard 

de, 1284, 158. 
Archer, John le, 1251, 12. 
Argentem, Reginald de, 1308, 346. 
Argenteyne, John de, 1323, 419. 
Arundel, Earl of, Richard, 1302, 288. 
Aspall (Haspal), (ialfrid de, 1283, 150. 
Aubeny, Walter de, 1273, 85. 
Aucher, Henry, 1303, 305. 

Badelesmere, Barthdloniew de and 
Margaret, 131 1, 387. 

Balun, John le, 1275, 98. 

Barbeflet, Nicholas de, 1295, 205. 

Bardeney, Robert de, 1303, 301. 

Baskervill, Abbot of St. George, 131 5, 
411. 

Basset, Edmund, 1307, 343. 

Basset, Isabella, 1261, 32. 

Basset, Sir Philip. 1271, 62, 64, 65. 

Bath and Wells, Bishop of, Robert 
Burnell, 1292, 198. 

Bathonia, John de, 1291, 185. 

Baxman, William, 131 2, 392. 

Beauchamp, Alice de, 1324, 443. 

Belle Campo, Cecilia de, 1320, 427. 

Belle Campo, Guy de, Earl of War- 
wick, J315, 408, 409, 411. 

Belle Campo, Matilda, Countess of 
Warwick, 1301, 281. 

Benestede, John de, 1324, 433. 

Berenger (Beneger), John, 1272,61,62. 

Bergaveny,Lordde,Johnde Hastinges, 
1325, 443- 

Bernival, Reginald de, 1259, 29. 

Berwyk, John de, 13 12, 392. 

Besilles, Edward de, 1304, 307. 

Bessill, Matthew^ de, 1268, 51. 



Blakeferd, Robert de, 1253, 13. 

Bluntesdon, Henry de, 1302, 294. 

Blundesdon, Henry de, 1305, 317. 

Bluntesden, Laurence de, 1301, 282. 

Bohun, Humphrey de, 1275, 99- 

Bohun, Humphrey de. Earl of Here- 
ford and Esse.x, 1299, 241 ; 1302, 
292 (2). 

Bohun, Joan, wife of Humphrey de, 
1284, 157. 

Bohun, John de, 1292, 189. 

Borden, Nicholas, 1301, 278. 

Beteler, Wenthian, wife of Robert, 
1242, I. 

Beteler, William le, of Wemme, 12S4, 

157. 
Beterell, Albred.i de, 1270, 54. 
Braybeef, William de, 1284, 155, 156. 
Bretun, John le, 1279, 125. 
Brewes, Mary, wife of William de, 

«327, 447- 
Brewosa, Peter de, 1312, 386. 
Brecweye, Walter de, 1290, 183. 
Brut, Robert le, 1302, 295. 
Buneclive, William, 1252, 13. 
Burdun, Nicholas. 1273, 86. 
Burdun, Robert, 12S0, 132. 
Burnel, Edward, 1316, 408. 
Burnel, Philip, 1294, 201 (2). 
Burnell, Robert, Bishop of Bath and 

Wells, 1292, 198. 
Bygod, Roger le. Earl of Norfolk, 

1307, 336. 
Byset, John, 1307, 33^, 334- 

Cadurcis, Paganus de, 1279, 124. 
Cadurcis (Chaworth, Chawrces), 

Patricius, 1258, 22, 24, 26 ; 1268, 

47 ; 1283, 145, 146; 1284, 147. 
Caleston, Roger de, 1292, 189, 190, 191. 
Candever, Agnes, wife of Henry de, 

1275, 106. 
Candever, Henry de, 1285, 162. 
Cantilupe, George de, 1274, 72>' 74, 77, 

81,83. 
Cantilupe, William de, 1249, 8 ; 1254, 

16, 17 ; temp. Henry III, 68. 
Cardinvell, William de, 1254, 14. 



Xll 



CONTENTS. 



Cerne, Henry de, 1296, 210. 
Charles, John, 131 1, 386. 
Chaucombe, Thomas de, 1305, 319. 
Chaucombe, Thomas, 1319, 425. 
Chaworth (Chawrces), see Cadurcis. 
Cheverel, Alexander, 1310, 453. 
Cherburg (Chyrebury), John de, 1269, 

52. 
Cherburg (Chireburgh), Wyganus de, 

1283, 150, 151. 
Cherburg (Chcreburgh), Wygan de, 

the heir of, 1284, 178 (2). 
Chiriel, extent of manor of, 1265, 42. 
Clare, (iilbert de, Earl of (Gloucester 

and Hertford, 1296, 210, 211 ; 1314, 

403- 
Clare, Joan, wife of Gilbert de, Earl 
of Gloucester and Hertford, 1307, 

337, 339- 

Clarendon, manor, view of, 1273, 88. 

Clifford, Robert de, 1302, 294. 

Cnovyle, Hogo de, 1307, 330. 

Cohere, Walter, 1251, 11. 

Columbarius, Avice de, 1259, 30. 

Columbarius, Matthew de, 1270, 57, 58. 

Combe, Alice, wife of Simon de, 1301, 

. 278. 

Combe (Cumbe), Richard de, 1293, 197. 

Combe, Simon de, 1300, 277. 

Cornwall, Earl of, Edmund, 1275, 
114 ; 1294, 203 ; 1299, 268; 1300, 
256, 263, 264, 273, 274(2); 1304, 

275- 

Cricklade, extent of manor of (probably 
in connection with the Inquisition 
of Baldwin de Insula, on p. 37. See 
Aubrey's "Wiltshire Collections," 
p. 150), 1263, 38. 

Crok, Richard, 1320, 426. 

Cuuele or Couvele, manor of, 1327, 
448. 

Danesye, Richard, 1250, u. 
Dansy, Richard, 131 5, 394. 
Danesy, Thomas, 1265, 42. 
Dargenteyne, John, 1323, 419. 
Daubeny, Walter, 1273, 85. 
Despenser, Alina la, 1281, 132, 133, 

134- 
Despenser, Hugh le, 1293, 198. 
Devizes, castle of, 1287, 172. 
Devon, Earl of, Baldwin de Insula, 

1263, 17. 
Doygnel, Silvester and Margaret his 

wife, 1293, 195. '96- 
Doynell, Robert, temp. Henry III, 66. 
Drokenesford, John, clerk, 1291, 185. 



Dunttanivilla, Walter de, 1270, 53. 
Duyn, William le, idiot, 131 1, 377. 

Echelhampton, Geofifrey, 1280, 128. 
Engleschvill, Theobald de, 1262, 33. 
Erlestoke, Thomas, son of Aluredus 

(le, '303, 3IO. 
Escudamor, see Scudamor. 
Essex, Dionisia de, 1300, 244. 
Essex, Hereford and. Earl of, Humph. 

de Bohun, 1299, 241 ; 1302, 292 (2). 
Esturmy, see Sturmy. 

Fitz Auger, Henry, 1295, 207. 
Fitz John, Herbert, 1321, 429. 
Fitz John, John (this heading should 

be inserted over the words " The 

extent of the manor of Chiriel"), 

1265, 42. 
Fitz John, John, 1275, 107, 108. 
Fitz John, Matthew, 1309, 374, 376. 
Fitz John, Richard, 1297, 215, 216, 

217. 
Fitz Matthew, Peter, 1249, 8. 
Fitz Nicholas, Robert, 1273, 84. 
Fitz Payn (Pagan), Robert, 1315, 407. 
Fitz Peter, Reginald, 1286, 166, 167. 
Fitz Reginald, John, 1306, 325. 
Fitz Reynaud, Peter, 1322, 431. 
Fitz-Warin, William, 1300, 243. 
Flexberg, Picotus de, 1280, 131. 
Flory, (Giles de, 1283, 149. 
Forde, Adam de la, 1326, 444. 
F.orstebury, John, 1309, 351, 352. 
Fraunceys, Philip le, 1294, 203. 
Fraunceys, William, 1286, 166. 
Fukeram, Richard, 1281, 137. 

Gascelyn, Edmund, 1307, 347. 
Gaselin, Joan, 1287, 169, 170. 
Gascelyn, Rogo, 1322, 430. 
Gifford, Elias, 1248, 4. 
Giffard,John, of Brumesfeld, 1299, 230. 
Giffard, Margaret, wife of John, 1299, 

238. 
Giffard, Walter, .Archbishop of York, 

1279, 125. 
Gloucester and Hertford, Earl of, see 

Clare, (Gilbert de and Joan de. 
Godervill, Walter, 1249, 7. 
Godestowe, Abbess of, 1284, 159. 
Golafre, John, 1297, 213. 
Greye, John de, 1324, 436. 
Grymstede, Andrew de, 1324, 441. 
Grimstede, John de, 1288, 173. 
Grymstede, John de, 1314, 395. 
Gurnay, Robert, 1269, 49. 



CONTENTS. 



XUl 



Haches, Eustace de, 1282, 144. 
Hampstede, John de, 1303, 291. 
Hanekinton, John de, 1279, 128. 
Haraz, Cristina, wife of Henry, 13 19, 

424. 
Harden, Richard de, 1249, 7- 
Hardene, Richard de, 1294, 200. 
Hardene, William de, 1303, 302. 
Hastinges, John de, Lord de Berga- 

veny, 1325, 443. 
Haversham, Matilda de, 1289, 180. 
Haversham, Nicholas, 1248, 5. 
Haveresham, Nicholas de, 1274, 92. 
Haveresham, Nicholas, son of Nicholas 

de, 1276, 116, 119. 
Havering, John de, 1302, 286. 
Hayres, Ralph de, 1260, 29. 
Helynton, Dionisia de, 1306, 322. 
Hellington, Dionisia de, 1308, 328. 
Heose, see Huse. 
Hereford and Essex, Earl of, Humph. 

de Bohun, 1299, 241 ; 1302, 292 (2). 
Herez, Richard, 1257, 21. 
Hertford, Gloucester and, Earl of, 

Joan, wife of Gilbert de Clare, see 

Clare. 
Hide, Abbot and Convent of, 1306, 323. 
Homyng^on, Edith de, 1290, 183. 
Hundreds of Swaneberwe, Ruebergh, 

and Stodford, 1268, 46. 
Huse(Hose), Geoffrey, temp. Henry 1 1 1, 

69. 
Hussee, Henry, 1290, 182. 
Huse, Hubert de, the coheirs of, 1284, 

160. 
Husey, James, 1249, 6. 
Huese (Heose), James, 1249, 10, 41 ; 

1263, 41. 
Husee, Matilda, daughter of Hubert, 

1285, 160. 
Hose, Nicholas de la, 1274, 99 ; 1300, 

245. 
Huse, Peter de la, 1307, 329. 

Ingham, John de, 13 10, 451. 

Ingham, Oliver de, 1282, 137 ; 1324, 

437- 
Insula, Baldwin de. Earl of Devon, 

1263, 37. 
Ippele, William, son of Hugh de, 

^303, 304- 

Karentham, Roger de, 1289, 179. 
Kaynes, Robert de, 1281, 138, 140 ; 

1306, 327. 
Kenely, John, 1261, 34. 
Knolle, Adam la, 1278, 121, 



Kyngestone, Anastasia de, 1324, 439. 
Kyngestone, Nicholas de, 1323, 432. 

Lacock, Abbess of, 1259, 32. 

Lacy, Henry, Earl of Lincoln, 1285, 

163. 
Lacy, Henry de. Earl of Lincoln, 

1311,382. 
Lacy, Joan, wife of Henry de, 1322, 

430- 
Lancaster, Earl of, Edmund, 1297, 

217, 218. 
Larkestok, Jordanus de, 1304, 309. 
Laverestoke, Robert de, 1250, 10. 
Lillebon, William, 131 5, 406. 
Lincoln, Earl of, Henry Lacy, i285» 

163. 
Lincoln, Earl of, Henry de Russell, 

131 1, 382. 
Lokington, Roger de, 1 244, 2. 
London, Hawisia de, 1274, 91. 
Longespeye, Emelina, 1291, 186. 
Lovel, Hugh, 1292, 184. 
Lovel, John, 1287, 168. 
Lovel, John, of Tychmersch, 13 10, 

378. 
Lucy, Robert de, 1263, 35, 36. 

Malewayn, John, 1321, 429. 
Malmesbury, Abbot of, 1285, 163. 
Mannestone, Richard de, 1287, 173. 
Manneston, Richard de, 1290, 184. 
Mare, Gunnora de la, 1249, 3 ! i-5o, 9- 
Mare, Peter de la, temp. Henry III, 

70 ; 1292, 192. 
Mare, Robert de la, 1272,60; 1308, 

353i 354- 
Marescallus (Marshall), William le^ 

1261, i2>- 
Marisco, Thomas de, 1252, 14. 
Marlborough, a messuage in, 1256, 

19, 20. 
Marleburgh, the men of the Barton 

of, temp. Henry III, 69. 
Marlborough, Prior of St. Margaret 

at, 1270, 55. 
Marmyon, Philip, 1277, 100, loi (2),. 

102, 103. 
Mauduyt, John, 1303, 297, 298. 
Maudut, Robert, 1288, 175. 
Maudut, Thomas, proof of age, 1308,. 

372. 
Mauduit, Warinus, 1300, 249. 
Mauduyt, Warinus, 1303, 305. 
Mauduit, William, 1273, 90, 91. 
Maundevill, John de, 1276, 110(2), iii,, 

112 ; 1305, 318. 



XIV 



CONTENTS. 



Maundeville, Ralph de, 1280, 129. 
Melksham, manor, extent of, 1275, 

114. 
Meriet, Mary, wife of John de, 1301, 

276. 
Merleberge, Nicholas de, 1276, 115. 
Michel, John, 1319,424. 
Mohun, John de, 1286, 168. 
Mohun, William de, 1282, 141 ; 1297, 

214. 
Moigne, Henry le, 131 5, 398. 
Moyngne, William le, 1295, 206. 
Monte Alto, Milicent de, 1299, 222. 
Mortuo Mari, Edmund de, 1304, 308. 
Moxhatn, Adam de, 1277, 121. 
Mulford, Edmund de, 1305, 311. 
Muleford, Richard de, temp. Henry III, 

67. 
Munemuth, John de, 1257, 21. 

Nevill, Ernisius de, 1257, 21. 

Neville, Joan de, 1263, 35. 

Nevile, John de, 1280, 129 ; 1282, 142, 

143- 
Nevill, William de and Cristina, 1306, 

327. 
Norfolk, Earl of, Roger le Bygod, 

1307, 336. 

Okeburn, Prior of, 1270, 56. 
Oliver, Roger, 1276, 104, 105. 
Olney, John de, 1325,445. 

Paveley, Reginald de, 1280, 130. 
Pavely, Walter de, 1256, 18. 
Paveley, Walter de, 1323, 434. 
Paynel, John, 1318, 422, 423. 
Paynell, Katherine, 1296, 213. 
Paynel, Philip, proof of age, 1290, 187. 
Paynel, William de and Margaret, 

1307, 342. 
Paynel, William, 1316, 413. 
Peche, Sir Herbert, 1272, 66. 
Penbrigge, Fulk de, 1296, 209. 
Penebrigge, Henry de, 1279, 123, 124. 
Peverell, Agnes, 1257, 22. 
Peverel, Hugh, 1296, 208, 221. 
Peverel, Thomas, of Samford, Devon, 

13CO, 248. 
Pinkeney, Ralph de, 1271, 58. 
Pipard, Isabella, 1297, 219. 
Pypard, Robert, 1278, 123. 
Plaunche, James de la and Matilda, 

1306, 322. 
Plessitis, Hugh de, 1301, 283. 
Plokenet, Alan de, 1299, 225, 229. 
Polhampton, Richard de, 1 317, 416. 



Posteme, Richard de la, 1293, 199. 
Poyntz, Nicholas de and Matilda and 

Elizabeth, 131 1, 387. 
Pulham, Geoffrey de, 1303, 303 
Punsard, Geoffrey, 1263, 34. 
Putton, James de, 1255, I7- 
Putton, John de, 1320, 426. 
Putton, William de, 1297, 222 
Puylle, John de and Mabel, 1303, 303. 

Quyntyn, Henry, 1284, 152. 
Quyntyn, William, 1290, 181. 

Ripariis (Ryvere), John de la, 13 14, 

397. 
Riviere, Amicia de la, 1305, 320. 
Rokele, Richard de la, 1277, u6, 

117 (2). 
Romsey, Abbess of, 1272, 65. 
Romesey, Abbess of, 1278, 122 ; 1280, 

130 ; 1281, 136. 
Rude, William de, 1325, 440. 
Russell, Robert, son of Robert, 1307 

344- 
Russell, William, 1306,324 ; 131 1, 381. 

SafiFrey, William, 1325, 440. 
Salisbury, bridge of, 1267, 47. 
Salisbury, Bishop of, Giles, 1263, 37. 
Salisbury, Bishop of, Herbert, 1249, 4- 
Sancto Amando, Almaricus de, 1310, 

379- 
St. Amando, John de, 1306, 325. 
St. George de Baskervill, Abbot of, 

1315,411- 
Sancto Martino, Lawrence de, 1318, 

420, 421. 
St. Martino, Reginald de, 1306, 324. 
Sancto Martino, Reginald de, 1314, 

400, 402. 
St. Mauro, Agnes de, 1258, 31 (2). 
St. Mauro, Laurence de, 1297, 212. 
St. Maure, Nicholas de and Eva, 

1307, 345- 
Sancto Mauro, Nicholas de, 13 16, 412. 
St. Mauro, William de, felon, 1297, 

220. 
St. Quintino, Herbert de, 1303, 296. 
St. Vigore, Thomas de, 1295, 205. 
Scudamor(Escudamor), Peter de, 1293, 

194. 
Segrave, Stephen de, 1327, 446. 
Shafton (Shaftesbury), Abbess of, 

1307, 341- 
Spilleman, Peter, 1292, 191. 
Stane, Cristina, wife of Peter de la, 

1318, 418. 



CONTENTS. 



XV 



Stanlegh, Abbot of, 1285, 165 ; 1294, 

202. 
Staunton St. Quinton, manor of, 1283, 

148. 
Sterre, Richard, 1285, 162. 
Stoke, Adam de and Jeva, 13 12, 391. 
Stokes, Dionisia and Robert her son, 

1293, 195- 
Stratton, Adam de, 1294, 202 ; 1305, 

314- 
Sturmy (Stormy), Henry de, 1295, 206. 
Sturmy (Stormy), Henry, 1305, 312. 
Sturmy (Esturmy), Margaret, 1320, 

428. 
Stut, John le, 1305, 316. 
Styne, John, idiot, 1309, 373. 
Swindon, Thomas de West, 1293, 199. 
Syward, Thomas, 1289, 176, 177. 

Taverner, William le, 1269, 50. 
Tewkesbury, Abbot of, 1306, 325. 
Thony, Robert de, 1309, 373. 
Thyeys, Henry, 1307, 350. 
Tregoz, John, 1269, 54. 
Tregoz, John de, 1301, 253, 254. 
Tudeworth, Reginald de, 1304, 310. 
Turberville, Richard de, 1284, 153, 

154(2). 
Turpin, Matthew, 1279, 126(2), 127. 
Tyeys, Henry, 1324, 438. 
Tyeys, Margaret, 1324, 438. 

Umfraye, Edith, daughter of John, 

1281, 135. 
Upton, John, son of Walter de, 1305, 

321. 

Verdon, John de, 1274, 97 (2). 
Verdon, Theobald de, 1316, 414. 
Vivona, Hugh de, 1243, i. 



Vivonia, John de, 13 14, 399- 

Wake, Christiana, 1249, 6. 
Wake, Matthew, 1247, 3. 
Waleys, Ingelramus le, 1304, 306. 
Walraund, Isabella, 1309, 364, 366, 368. 
Walraund, John, 1309, 355, 357, 361, 

363. 
Waleraund, Matilda, 1273, 87. 
Waleraund, Robert, 1273, 71, 72, 73. 
Warre, Roger la, 1302, 293. 
Warwick, Earl of, Guy de Bello 

Campo, 131 5, 408, 409, 411. 
Warwick, Countess of, Matilda de 

Bello Campo, 1301, 281. 
Whaddon, Henry, 1254, 15. 
Wiggebere, William de, 1325, 442. 
Wilton, Richard de, 1301, 287. 
Wilton, Waher de, 1277, 118(2). 
Wilton, Hospital of St. Giles of, 1301, 

285. 
Winterburn le Cunte, extent of manor 

of, 1250, 12. 
Winton, Abbess of St. Mary's Convent, 

1285, 193. 
Wodeward, Matilda, daughter of 

Roger, 1283, 144. 
Worcester, Bishop of, Godfrey, 1302, 

290. 
Wotton, John de, 1300, 247. 
Wydecumbe, John de, 1292, 193. 
Wyghebergh, Richard de, 1270, 59(2). 
Wyke, John de, temp. Henry J 1 1, 67. 
Wyking, Adam, 1305, 316. 

York, Archbishop of, Walter Gififard, 

1279, 125. 
Ysembard, William, 1259, 1260, 28(3). 

Zouche, Alan de, 1314, 393, 394. 



ABSTRACTS 

OF THE 

3Jnqui6itiones 0ost iHortem 

RELATING TO WILTSHIRE, 

Returned into the High Court of Chancery from the Reign of 
King Henry HI. 

mentl^ian, trife of JSobett iBotelet* 

Inquisition made hy Richard de Cova, Walter de Bluntesdum, 
Reginald de Kinggareheye, Simon Tracy, Richard Wodeward, 
William Strugnil, Waller Oitebur, Alexander de Etun^ Walter Runel, 
Hugh Estrel, William Goldsmith [Aurifabrum], and Robert de Meisy, 
who say that 

The land of Pultun was not the land of ybe Normans, and they 
say that Robert de Buthlers held the said land, and was English, and 
after his decease the same descended to Baldwin, his younger 
brother, who married Wenteliana, and they say that the court is 
worth, yearly one mark, and in demesne there are 3 carucates of 
land, worth 15 marks per annum, and in villeinage there are 20 
virgates of land, each virgate of which is worth per annum 6j. 
And there are in 4 work-days \^precarie'\ in Au^^mn \d. In work- 
days of the ploughs per annum i</., and in work-days of the harrows 
\d. And they say that Waller Frankelanus holds one virgate of land 
and pays per annum 5J. Sum, £1"] js, 6d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 Henry HI, No. 27. 



Extent of the manor of Westkington, which was of Hugh 
de Vivona, made by command of the King in the presence 
of the sheriff and escheator of the county of Wilts, by the oath of 
Adam Ive, Roger the Clerk, Roger Scot, Simon the baker [pistoris], 
Geoff ry son of Richard, Elias de Aldrington, Stephen son of Stephen, 
Stephen de Budeston, fohn de Schorston, Thomas son of Peter, Roger 
2 « 



2 Wilts kt re 

de Pedeworih, John le Blund, William le Otselur, and Walerand 
de Wrokeshall, who say that 

At Westkington there are £\\ 6s. id. of rent of assize. 
Also the toll of the carts lipon the hill amounts to one mark. 
And the pannage of the pigs amounts to i2d. Also there 
are there 4^ quarters and 3 bushels of wheat of Chiresetto, 
which amount to i^s. 6d., the price of each quarter 4J. And there 
are there 42 cocks and hens of Chiresetto, which amount to zs. ']\d., 
price of 4 hens ^d. Also there are there 275 acres to be cultivated 
each year, which amount to £\ i \s. Sd., price of an acre ^d. And 
there are there 15 acres of meadow, which amount to 20s., price of 
an acre i6d. Also there is pasture for 16 oxen and 4 cows, which 
is worth per annum 6s. Sd., price of the pasture for one ox ^d. 
And there is there pasture for 350 sheep, which is worth 14J. 7^., 
price of the pasture of one sheep Id. Also the herbage of the 
beasts amounts to 3^. per annum. And the garden extends to 2s. 
Sum, £ig i6s. 6^d. 

Whereof there is paid for tithe per annum 15^. ii\d. of the 
£"] igj. 6d. of the rent of assize aforewritten. And so the sum of 
the whole extent of the said manor is per annum clear, the said 
tithe being deducted, £i() os. id. Whereof there is assigned by 
command of the said King to Peironilla, who was the wife of Hugh 
de Vivona, for her dower the third part of the said manor with the 
appurtenances, which is worth per annum £"] 6s. lo^d. And 
so there remains to the lord the King two parts of the said manor 
with the appurtenances, which are worth per annum ;i^i2 i^s. S^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Henry III, No. 22. 



Eoger De iLofifngton. 

Ralph de Foxcote, William de Chossham, Walter Driwe, Walter the 
Clerk of Langele, Miles de Langelye, Richard le Waleis, William 
Plusbel{?), William de la Hida, Henry de la Boxa, John Brokeneby, 
William de Corston, and John Esturun, jurors, who say that 

Roger de Lokinton ought to have common in the meadow which is 
called the More in Shoreston, as belonging to his free tenement in 
Lokington, when the field of Lokinton, which extends towards the 
said meadow, lies open and not sown. And that Matthew de Bezill 
cannot possess the said park wholly, but that the aforesaid Roger 
may have his common when the said field of Lokington lies open 
and not sown, as is aforesaid. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Htnry III, No. 36. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 



Inquisition made ofthe land which was of 5'z'rJ!/aMm; Wake, 
of Hebelesburnel, in co. Wilts, by the oath of Sir Richard 
de Dume/ord, John Aleng, Henry Toley, Gilbert Asse, Henry 
de Dumeford, Roger Dogeing, William We/r-uc, Robert Makerol, 
William Alex, John de Durneford, John de Gerarddeston, John Waujre, 
who say that 

The said 3fatheiv held the manor of Hebelesburnel of the King 
in chief by one knight's fee. And there are there 2 carucates of 
land in demesne, worth per annum bos. The court with the 
curtilage is worth per annum 4^. Of rent of assize £-i ^s. ii^d. 
Also the meadow is worth per annum 40^. The pasture for cows is 
worth 20s., and the pasture for sheep 4.0s. Also one windmill is 
worth per annum one mark. Also the issues of the wood and the 
perquisites of the said manor are worth per annum 20s. Also 
the customs of villeins from the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula up to 
the feast of St. Michael are worth 20s. ^d. Also the customs 
of villeins from the feast of St. Michael (?) up to the feast of 
St. Peter ad Vincula are worth 23J. ^d. Also the tallage in common 
years is worth 7^. Sum, ;^i5 12s. o\d. 

And they say that Cristiana, Joan, and Ellen, daughters of the said 
Malhew, are his next heirs, and are of mature age, and are married. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 32 Henry III, No. i. 



dE^unnora De la fmxt. 

Writ dated loth January, 33 Henry HI [1249]. 

Inquisition taken before Sir J. de Vernun, escheator in 
CO. Wilts, 35 Henry HI [i 250-1], of the land, rent, and other 
issues of the land which was of Gunnora de la Mare, in the manor 
of Wynterburne, in co. Wilts, by the oath of Reginald Chelkere, 
Henry le Dun, John de Nevill, John Swoting, John Miller, Peter 
Arnold, Richard Palmer, Walter Oede, John le Sauvage, Robert 
Churstein, Walter Tropenel, and Hugh le Frankeleyn, who say that 

Gunnora de la Mare held of the King in chief in Winterburne 
one carucate of land in demesne worth per annum 37^. ^d., and 
a meadow worth per annum 3J. She held the same of the King 
by the service of being doorkeeper of the King's Hall. Four free men 



4 Wiltshire 

pay pcf annum \os. %d. rent and i lb. of pepper. The rent of the 
villeins is worth per annum £\ \s. %^d. The pasture is worth per 
annum \bs. \\\d. 

The son of Henry de la Mare, whose name the jurors know not, 
is the heir of the said Gunnora de la Mare, and is aged 15 years. 
Sum of the whole extent per annum, £1 \os. od. 

\_There is also an Inquisition relating to Oxfordshire attached Jo the 

above. ~\ 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 33 Henry III, No. 38. 



TBi^l^op of ^ali)3bur^* 

Writ dated 24th April, 33 Henry III [1249]. 

Inquisition made by Richard de Heynton, Alexander 
Cheveroy, Robert de Stutescumbe, William de Kalne, Henry 
Hynel, William de Torrenny, John Barbost, William de Everl, John 
de Colingburn, Richard Sokemund, John de Fijhyde, and Walter 
de Heynton, who are all without the liberty of the Bishop o^ Salisbury, 
and who say that 

Herbert, sometime Bishop of Salisbury, held one carucate of land 
in Geydon as an escheat of his Church of Salisbury, and afterwards 
he "gave it to Peter de Camera, who held it all his life; and after 
his death Robert, sometime Bishop of Salisbury, seised it into his 
hand as his right and escheat, and gave the same to Philip of 
St. Ellen ; and afterwards the said Bishop gave to the said Philip 
10 marks to quitclaim the said land to the said Bishop and his 
Church, who died thereof seised. 

One Oriota held one carucate of land in Bissopiston of Richard, 

formerly Bishop of Salisbury, and after the death of the said Oriota 

the Bishop seised the same into his hand, and gave it to Adam 

Drakx for his life, and after his death the said Bishop seised it, and 

died thereof seised. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 33 Henry III, No. 43. 



Cliajs (t^iffotu* 



Inquisition made of the lands which were of Elias Giffard, 
in CO. Wilts, by the oath of Nicholas de Wyly, John de Lange- 
Jord, William de Gares, Peter de Gares, Roger de Molendina, Thomas 
le Porter, Richard le Bo . . . , John le Coc, John Ace, and William 
Carpenter, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 5 

Elias Gifford held the manor of Winterburne of the King in chief 
as head of his barony. And there are there 3 carucates of land 
in demesne, which are worth, with the meadow and pasture and 
curtilage, £\b zs. Also of rent of assize yearly 72^. Afd., and tallage 
yearly 5^. Also the customs of villeins are worth per annum 39J., 
and the perquisites yearly 4^. Sum, £zz os. \\d. 

The said Elias held the manor of Sernton of the King, belonging 
to the said barony. And there are there 3 carucates of land in 
demesne, worth per annum, with the garden, meadow, and pasture, 
£\i 18 J. Also one mill worth 26J. %d. Also of rent of assize per 
annum i\s. ^d. The customs of villeins are worth per annum 
;^4 6s. id. Also tallage yearly 8j., and perquisites yearly 4-r. Sum, 
;^2I i\s. id. 

Also the manor of Ayston of John MaMravers in free marriage. 
And there is there one carucate of land worth per annum, with the 
garden, meadow, and pasture, 78^. Also of rent . . . ySs. lod. 
The customs of villeins are worth per annum 68s. S^d. Tallage 
. . . Perquisites yearly 2J. Sum, ;^ii i^s-j^d. 

. . . Giffard, son of the said Elias, is his next heir, and is 
aged 16 years. \_Part of this Inquisition is torn away.^ 

Chan. Inq. p m., 33 Henry III, No. 53. 



TIlC names of those by whom the extent of the lands of 
Sir Nicholas de Haversham, in co. Wilt^ was made, to wit, 
John le Blund de Cumpton, Henry Hamund, of Merton, Roger 
Peytevyn, . . . Bor, Symon Giffard, Geoffrey Cof, Robert CoJ, 
Roger de Leans, John de Cynnos, Robert Alisandre, Walter Harevel, 
and Nicholas Burdeyn de Hugeford, who say that 

He held nothing of the King in chief in co. Wilts, but that he 
held in the vill of Cumpton half a knight's fee of John . . . stede, 
the moiety of the said vill by the service of scutage. There are 
there of rent of assize £iz ']s. id. per annum ; also 2 carucates of 
land, containing ..." acres and 43," and are worth £6 is. 6d. 
The meadow is worth 16s. Sd., the pasture isd., the mill 16s. Sd., 
the garden, with the easement of the court and with the curtilage 
and mill, 16s. 8d. The profit of the wood is worth per annum 
6s. Sd. The customs of the villeins and other customs, with 
perquisites, are worth per annum is. Tallage per annum los. The 

2 * 



6 Wiltshire 

advowson of the Church of Bereford, worth 20 marks, belongs to the 
said manor. 

Also in the vill of Bereford of Sir William Avenel 3 virgates of 
land for which he paid ye^xVy 20s., and they are worth 20J. 

The sum of the said lands, except the advowson of the said 
Church, is £24. igs. ^d. 

Nicholas de Haversham is his son and next heir, and is of full age. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 33 Henry III, No. 69. 



Roger de Croivale, Simon de Parco, Philip Marmion, Wan'n de Opton, 
Thomas de Hynetune, John de Foro, Thomas le Wodeward, Thomas 
Vicar, Herbert Styward, Walter Swoting, John Michel, and John 
Savery say that 

The wood of Norrige, which Henry Huse says belongs to his 
manor of Stapelford, was taken into the hands of the King for this 
reason : htczxxse James Huse, deceased, died seised of the said wood 
of Norrige, who held of the said King in chief £■] of rent in 
Chippeham, and a certain assart in Norrige, for which he paid 
to the King every year i6</., whereupon Sir John de Vernon, 
escheator, took the said wood, with his other lands and tenements, 
into the King's hands, after the death of the said James Huse. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 2. 



Cl^riistiana mafie* 

John Alayn, Henry Tulit, John de Durne/ord, Henry de Durnejord, 
Gilbert de Ese, John de Gerardeston, Richard Peres, Martin ' de 
Molendina, Richard son ol John, Robert de Legha, John Hey run, and 
Adam Wake, who say that 

Christiana Wake ought to hold of the King in chief in Eblesburne 
half a knight's fee by the service of half a knight's fee, which is worth 
per annum in homage, services, rents, and all other issues of the 
land £10, whereof there is now in seisin /'s. 

The said Christiana is the next heir oi Matthew Wake, and is aged 
28 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 15. 



Inquisitioties Post Mortem. 



ISicl^arD De l^atDen. 

John de Colingeburn, Walier Cheffing, Ralph le Pareille, William 
Malewein, Herbert de Escote, Robert le Blund, Geoffrey Hoppegras, 
Robert Prangenel, John de Escote, Gilbert de Ferstogbur, Geoffrey 
Vareman, and Robert Curteis, who say that 

Richard de Harden held of the demesne of the King in co. Wilts, 
in the town of Harden, z^ acres of land, by the service of keeping 
the woods of Bedewinde, which are called the Bruz de Bedewinde, 
and are worth per annum zs. He also held in the same town 
6 bovates of land of Robert de Punchardun and Letewaria oj 
Estandeburn, by the service of finding one man with one horse of the 
price of half a mark with one sumptuary saddle, and one sack of 
grain to the aforesaid R. and L. [^;'<r] at Wales for the King's army 
when the King shall have an army there: they are worth per 
annum in rents and other issues 35J. 

Richard de Harden is the son and next heir of the said Richard, 

and is aged 25 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.y 34. Henry 11 J No. 16. 



2Halter d^ouertUl. 

Richard Hennot, Henry Coluns (Colmis), William Morin, Peter 
de Grangea, Robert son of Ralph, Gilbert de Aula, Luke Guile, 
. . . son of the Clerk \_filius clerici^, Symon de Chyverel, Nicholas 
de la Hele, Thomas le Blund, and William Gole say that 

Walter de Godervill held in the town of Chyverel in co. Wilts of 
^\x John de Balun 2 carucates of land by the service of one knight's 
fee, and they are worth per annum, clear, £\ \ izs. o^d. 

Joan and Margery are the daughters and next heirs of the said 
Walter-, the said Joan is aged 15 years and the said Margery 
6 years. 

The said Walter did not hold any other land in the said county 
except the land of Chuppeham, which he held of the King in chief. 

John de Eston, Walter Dreu, Thomas Buhbe, Ralph de Foxcote, 
Ely as de Caillewor, Richard de Hertham, William de Aiswll, Walter 
son of the parson [fit pson], Roger de Lek .... senior, 
Richard Horn, James the reeve, and John le \Vyte say that Walter de 
Godervill held of the King in chief 2 carucates of land in the 
manor of Chuppeham by the service of the fourth part of a knight's 



8 Wiltshire 

fee ; they are worth per annum, clear, . . s. \d. He also held 
of the King in the said manor one virgate of land by the service of 
one bow of " auburri," worth per annum 7 .... of the 
land of purpresture in the said manor, for which he ought to 
pay yearly 2 marks, and it is not worth anything more per annum. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry HI, No. 20. 



CBilliam De Cantelupe* 

Extent made of the manor of Pulton, which was at one 
time in the hands of Sir William de Cantelupe, by the oath 
of Walter de Boulers, Richard Scotmodyn, Walter de Upton, Simon de 
Tracy, Reginald de Kinegareshey, Simon de La Cove, Richard Forestar, 
Laurence Bygun, William de Strugnyl, William Goldsmith [AurifabrJ, 
Thomas le Falconer, and William Waleis, who say that 

In demesne there are at Pulton 400 acres, whereof 200 acres are to 
be sown in one year and 200 are to be ploughed, price of the acre 
to be sown lod. Sum of the money for the acres to be sown 
jf8 6s. Sd. Also there are there in demesne of meadow 32!- acres 
of meadow to be mown every year, price of the acre 2s. Sum of 
the meadow 65J. They also say the demesne pasture is worth per 
annum ^s. The court, with the garden and dovecote, is worth 
per annum one mark. In the rents of freerhen 5^. per annum. 
There are there 20 virgates of land of villeinage, price of each 
virgate one mark. Sum of the villeinage /'13 6s. %d. There is 
nothing further there of escheats or other issues of land. 

Sum of the said sums, £zi igj. M. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 24. 



I^eter^ %m of i^attl^etp. 

Writ dated at " Wudestok " loth June, 34 Henry HI [1250], 
commanding the sheriff to make an extent of the manor 
of Pfttesbury, which the King had lately recovered against Peter, son 
of Matthew, as his escheat. 

[Note. — The said Peter is not mentioned in the Inquisition.'] 
Henry Barth, Philip de Berewycke, William de Berewycke, Ralph de 
Barevill, Robert Alurich, Robert de Tessewrth, Walter of the same, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 9 

Richard de la Forde, William Reymund, Richard le tenturer, Walter 
Everard, Robert de Berewyck say that 

The manor of Patesbur has in demesne 107 acres which are 
now in corn [?« bladal\ price of each acre to be sown or in 
grain iid. Also in the south field, which now lies fallow, 
120 acres, price of each acre to be sown \id. Also 8 acres 
of meadow, price of each acre yearly is. Also of the issue of 
the pasture and herbage i6s. Also of the issue of the garden 
and curtilage 45'. Of rents of assize of free tenants, to wit, of 
Walter Everard zos., of Ralph de Barnevill one pair of gilt spurs, 
price bd. Also of 4 rustics \rusticis\ 245'., 30 acres, and 4 buildings. 
Also of 10 cottagers 9-?. id. Also of 6 capons 9^. Item of 34 hens 
3^. zd. 

Walter Smaleman is bound {tenetur'\ to give for his life half 
a mark that he may remain as long as he will. 

And this extent was made at Marleberg before the King on 
Tuesday in the vigil of the Apostles Peter and Paul, 34 Henry III 
[1250]. 

Sum of the first year without corn, £\q> -js. yd. Sum of the 
second year as fallow, /'i i i\s. id. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 25. 



(t^unora ne la iittare* 

Writ dated at Windles 13th February, 34 Henry III [1250]- 

Inquisition made in the county of Wilts of the lands of 
Gunora de la Mare, by the oath of John de Mara, Symon 
Cosin, John Swoting, Henry de Budenhulk, John de Grimstede, 
Richard Palmarius de Button, Thomas Cute {} Ente), Thomas Godwine, 
Peter Arnold, Reginald le Chekere, Hugh le Franckeleyn, and Walter 
Edo, who say that 

Gunora de Mara held in said county of Wilts, to wit, in the vill 
of Winterburn, of the King in chief, one carucate of land belonging 
to the manor of Alvescote ; which said manor she held by the 
serjeanty of finding one doorkeeper for the King to keep the door 
of his hall, and is worth per annum, in all issues of land, / 8 55. 7^. 
Henry de Tracy, son of Henry de Tracy, is the next heir of the said 
Gunora, and is aged 1 2 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 26. 



10 Wilts hire 



E 



mhtxt tie Laterfee^tofte* 

Writ dated at Oxford 13th September, 34 Henry III [1250]. 

XtCnt of the lands and tenements which were oi Robert de 
Laverekestoke, by the oath of . . . Cusin, Richard le 
Paumer, Peter EmanJ, Walter Ode, Walter Cropmel, Ralph le Beufis, 
Hugh le Frankelenyn, of Wintersleweye, William . . mund, Ralph 
Atte/oure, Robert Thurstan, John le Sauvage, and John le Waleys, who 
say that 

Robert de Laverkestoke held in chief of the King the moiety of his 
court against the south, containing ^ acre, and one virgate of land 
in Laverkestoke, doing therefore the service of keeping the forest 
of Clarendon, together with James de Puttcne and Richard de 
Mulejord, and is worth per annum \ mark. He held of the Prior 
of the monastery of Hederose the other moiety of the court against 
the north, and one mill at Mummeworth, by the yearly service of 
I OS. ^d. ; one is worth 35. He held of Stephen de Wodejand 2 
virgates of land in Laverkestoke, paying therefor yearly loj. ; they 
are worth zs. Also of Lord John, son of Geoffrey, one mill of the 
fee of Winterslowe, paying therefor yearly 5^., worth per annum 
5^. He had in rents 4^., but nothing in villeinage or other issues 
of the land. 

Jordan, son of the said Robert, is his next heir, and is aged 
17*^ years. 

Sum of the whole extent beyond the services due, los. Sd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 30. 



Writ dated at Reading 13th November, 34 Henry HI [1249]. 

Henry Kaynel, Ralph de Foxcote, Roger de Stodleye, Richard de 
Hertham, Walter de Jonte, Adam Lucas, Richard Payn, John le Ken, 
William Bolt, Henry de Kent, William de Heywode, Peter de Wrokeshale 
say that 

The lands and tenements which James Heose held for his life in 
the manors of Clureham, Ridlawe, and Hupehull are worth per 
annum £'] os. io\d., whereof Dame Agnes de Ruedon [holds] . 
acres of land in Ruedon and 3 mills, and paid yearly 52^. ; Robert 
Derierd holds one virgate of land and pays yearly 8j. ; Henty 



Inquisitiones Post Mcrtem. 1 1 

Harding holds one virgate of land and pays per annum %s. ; John 
de la Bare holds one virgate of land and pays per annum 5^. td. ; 
Roger de la Hawe holds one virgate of land and pays yearly \is. ; 
Agnes de Sokerwyke holds one virgate of land and pays per annum 
MS. ; Waller de Porta holds one virgate of land and pays per annum 
ts. ; Eborard de Ridlawe z.x\^ John le Blyk hold one virgate of land in 
villeinage and pay per annum 19^. z\d. by extent and tallage ; Walter 
de Fidelden holds in like manner in villein ?.ge one virgate of land 
and pays yearly 7^. \d. and tallage ; Robert Hupehulle holds in 
villeinage \ virgate of land, worth per annum by extent bs. i \d., and 
tallage. 

James Heose held in demesne \ virgate of laud without a messuage, 
worth per annum by extent 5^. 

The said £'] os. zo\d. of land are of the demesne of the King, 
who gave them to the said James to keep hin in his service. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.., -4 Henry III, No. 40. 



iSicljarD De ant^^e. 

Writ dated at Westminster 15th April, 34 Henry III [1250]. 

Philip Marmion, Ralph Molendinar, John Sauer, Roger de Opton, 
Symund de Orgadale, Sauer de Dulton, P' rt de Dulton, John son 
o^ Thomas, John son o{ Rose, William J uven d^ Lye, William Gill ebert 
of the same, and William son of Henry de Bratton, jurors, say that 

Richard Danesye held of the King in Dulton and Bratton 
4 carucates of land by the service of the serjeanty of being in the 
army of the King for 40 days at his own costs ; and of Avicia de 
Columbar 7 marks of rent in let. The said 4 carucates are worth in 
demesnes, rents, villeinage, and all other issues of land, together 
with the said rent, £^1 6s. lo^d. 

Richard Danesye is his son and next heir, and is aged 1 2 years. 

Sum, £^2 6s. lo^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Henry III, No. 43. 



raalter CoUere- 

Writ dated at Clarendon 8th June, 35 Henry IH [1251]. 

Nicholas de Cunihe, Henry Dun, Peter de Kynngerniill, Ralph 
Fruanckes, Martin dc Homenton, Reginald de Homenton, William 
Fraunckes of Odestok, John de Molend, Roger Prost of Bruthford, 



1 2 Wilis hire 

William de Ponte de Lange/ord, William de Harham, and Thomas 
Ruffus de Harham, jurors, say that 

One messuage and 4 acres of land in Odestok, which are taken 
into the hands of the King because Waller Cohere, who held that 
messuage and land and abjured the kingdom of England for the 
death oi Matilda, daughter of Clement de Odestok, who was killed by 
the cart of the said Walte^ by accident, are of the inheritance of 
Edith, wife of the said Walter Coliere, and not of the inheritance of 
the said Walter. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Henry III, No. 1. 



Inquisition taken on Saturday next after the feast of 
St. Faith, 35 Henry III [1251], before Robert de Stephun, 
bailiff of Clarendo, by Richard de Muleford, John le Sauuage, Peter 
Arnold de Grimmestede, Walter Odenem, fames de Pucton, Robert 
Actofonne, Robert Viring, Robert Thursetyn, John le Waleys, Ralph de 
la Bure, Richard le Bel, dind. Hugh le Frankeleyn, sworn by command 
of the King, whether John le Archur " rettotus " of the hunting in 
the King's forest of Clarendon, held half a carucate of land in 
Farleg oi Henry le Dun, in fee or at the will of the said Henry of his 
bailiwick, say that the said John did not hold the said \ carucate 
in Farleg of the said Henry in fee or at will. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Henry III, No. 2. 



Writ dated at Clarendon 27th November, 35 Henry III [1250]. 

N3.niCS of those by whose oaths the extent of the manor of 
Winterburn le Cunte was made : Odo de Germestede, Matthew 
Turpyn, William Vyring, John Scwontyng, Hugh le Frankeleyn, 
William Turgis, Robert Dunpol, Ralph de Nevile, Walter Hende, 
John le Waleys, John le Sauvage, Robert le Grajtune, Peter Hernald, 
and Hugh le Frankeleyn, of Gremestede, who say that there are 
there of rent of assize -jis. 2\d.; also 2 carucates of land, worth 
£Af 1 5J, id. ; also 1 6 acres of meadow, worth per annum 24J. ; 
also pasture 26^. %d. ; also of rent of assize in the foreign hundred, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 13 

37^'. ; also in pleas of the foreign hundred, 6oj. ; also a garden, with 
the easement of the court, is. ; also customs of villeins and tallage, 
with market, herriot, and all other customs, \zs. ; also the advowson 
of the Church, worth 10 marks, belongs to the manor. Sum- 
total, £ \% OS. \i\d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.., 35 Henry III, No. 21. 



milUam 'Buneclite. 

InC[UlSltlOn made on Sunday next before Pentecost, 
36 Henry III [1252], before the verderors and foresters 
of the bailiwick of Savernake, by the oaths of William de Hywis, 
Ralph le Blund of Clatford, Richard de Suthcot, Picot de Flexbur, 
John Novun de Ore, Richard Quinton, William de Macy, Thomas de 
Afacy, Roger Doignel, Geoffrey Oppegras, Nicholas Emmelot, and John 
Chanlvin, who say that the bailiwick which William Buneclive held 
in chief of the King in the forest of Savernake is worth per annum 
12^. %\d. 

He also held of the King in chief one virgate of land, worth per 
annum one mark; also of the fee of the Abbot de la Baiaille 
5 virgate of land, worth per annum yj. And from these tenements 
there are going out 2 dowers. 

The said William de Buneclive had three sisters, whereof the eldest 
was called Margery, and she had one son named William, who is 
dead ; he had in matrimony two daughters, who now survive, of 
whom the eldest is called Juliana and is aged 20 years, and 
the second is called Isabella, who is aged 17 years. The said 
Margery is dead. 

The second sister was called Agnes, and is now dead ; she has 
one son called William, who is now living, and is of the age of 
25 years. 

The third sister was called Joan, and is now dead ; she had one 
son named William, who is now living, and is of the age of 21 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 36 Henry III, No. 29. 



iSobert De TBlafteforD. 

Writ dated at Windsor 26th February, 37 Henry HI [1253]. 

Matthew de Bunerton, Henry le Dun, Robert de Camera, Peter Krey, 
Robert Shyreman, Richard le proite, John de Molendino, William le 



14 Wiltshire 

Frankelain, Thomas le Ride, William de ponte, Luke de Fisserion^ and 
John de Len say that 

Robert de Blakeford held no tenement in co. Wilts in chief of 
the King, but he held of Lord Geoffry the Chamberlain by purchase 
65^. \d. rent per annum, paying to the said Geoffrey yearly \rd. and 
I lb. of cummin. 

The said Robert held no tenement of the inheritance of Avice, his 
wife, nor of his own. /o/in is his son and next heir, but they do not 
know his age, because he never came into the county of Wilts and 
was not brought up there. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 37 Henry III, No. 8. 



T • • • 

I nQUlSltlOri taken by command of the King at Deverel 
A Lungpunt on the day of St. Katharine, 37 Henry III [1252], 
by the oath of Henry de Hulk, Geoffrey Hoese, Thomas de Hyneton, 
William de Wyteclive, Vincent de Asgore, Edward Fulbe, Waller Ruscel, 
Thomas Pinfray, Henry Juste, John de Will, Richard le Poter, and 
Walter de Eadenhurste, who say that 

A certain Norman named Ernisius bought the land which Thomas 
de Marisco holds in Lungpunt Deverel of Walter de Estcrette, paying 
therefore yearly to the said Walter and his heirs \os., and to the 
convent of Glastonbury 5^., saving only suit twice a year at the 
hundred of the said Abbot of Glastonbury. The said Ernisius died 
seised of the said land as of fee, and had two daughters his heirs, 
but they went into Normandy when their father died, and are still 
there, and have never entered into the said land, but Annora, sister 
of the said Errnisius, after his death entered into the same and held 
it all her life ; and after her, Thomas, her son, who now holds it. 
The said land is worth per annum 40J., and contains only i^ virgate 
of land. And for this reason they say that it is the escheat of the 
King of his lands of Normandy. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 37 Henry III, No. 29. 



2Billiam De CarDintell. 

InCj^UlSltlOn taken at Sarum in co. Wilts on Tuesday 
next after the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
38 Henry HI [1254], h&^oxe James Fresel, of the lands which were 
of William de Kardunvill, to wit, for the hundred of Forde by 



Inquisittones Post Mortem. 15 

Laurence Agnel, William le Bray, Reginald le Engles ; and for the 
hundred of Thorngate by William Kas, Robert Austin, Richard de 
Flodiham, Walter Wyton, Nicholas de Mucheltun, Walter Dol, Richard 
Fuydelor, John de la Welle, Richard le Cuynter, John de Kyngbrig, 
John de Helmele, Richard de Purijet, John de la Forde, who say that 

The said William, de Cardinvell held in Cederlig of the King in 
chief 2 carucates of land, worth per annum in demesnes and other 
issues of land 8 marks ; also in la Hale one carucate of land, which 
is extended together with the appurtenances of Rakebum to loos. ; 
in Merthwude 6 tupt' [sic~\ of salt, worth per annum 6s. The said 
William also held of the fee of Sir John Maunsel in Feynsemor 
7 acres of land, worth per annum 3^. ; also o[ Nicholas de Haveres ham 
one carucate of land, worth per annum 40J. 

The said William married at the door of the Church a woman 
named Alice, lived with her 16 years, and had several sons and 
daughters, of whom one son named Richard, aged 4 years, is living. 

Then a woman called Joan came to the court and said that a long 
time ago she had had a son called Richard by the said William 
who she said was her husband, and the court ordered him to be 
divorced from the said Alice, and the said William and Joan lived 
together for a year and more. 

Now the jurors doubt whether, as the said Joan was never 
solemnly married at the church door, her son, aged 24 years, is the 
next heir, or Richard, son of the said Alice, who is aged 4 years, or 
whether either of them is the heir. They say that Robert de 
Cardinvill, brother of the said William, is his heir, and that the said 
land is in the hand of the King. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 38 Henry III, No. 24. 



Writ dated at Westminster 30th January, 38 Henry HI [1254]. 

Tills extent of the lands which were of Henry de Waddon 
in CO. Wilts is made by Peter de Bulkinton, William de 
Bcnatre, Micah de Bulkinton, Roger le Franckel, Roger le Gras, Roger 
de LilleshuU, Williani SoelJ, Nicholas Syward, Symond de Bradel, 
John le Foman, Wi'Ham de testeivode, Micah de Somolton, Roger 
Palmar, and Laurence de Bosco, who say that 

The said Henry de Waddon held of the King in the manor of 
Melkesham one pasture, paying yearly therefor \os. and tallage as 



1 6 Wiltshire 

often as the said manor is cut \jecatur\ ; the said pasture is worth 
per annum \os. 

He held of William Langesj)ee. one carucate of land in the manor 
of Waddonby the service cJf haW a crown \_dim scuti~\ ; the said 
carucate contains 35 acres, whereof eaph is worth per annum 3</. : 
sum 8j. 9^. 

There are there 7 acre? of meadow, whereof each is worth per 
annum bd. : sum 3J. bd. Also of the commodity of the mill per 
annum, los. ; of the garden per annum, 20s. ; and of the dovecote 
izd. Also of rent of assize per annum, 30J. ; of the commodity of 
the tallage per annum, 2s. ; of chersetum per annum, %d. ; of 
perquisites and other commodities, 5J. : sum £^ os. i id. 

The same holds in the said manor of Humfrey de Esconill 2 
hidates of land by the service of half a crown \di. scuti^ less the 
5th part ; they contain 25 acres of arable land, and each of them is 
worth per annum 3^. : sum bs. id. Also one acre of meadow 
worth per annum bd. ; also of the commodity of a certain wood 
which is . • . 2s.-. sum %s. ()d. 

He also held of the Abbess of Romesey 3 cottages at Packeles- 
croft, paying yearly 8x., worth per annum \zd. 

Sum-total, /^6 10s. 8d. 

Humfrey de Waddon, son of the said Henry, is his next heir and is 
aged 30 years. 

The advowson of the Church, which is worth 40J. belongs to the 
said fee of William Langespee. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 38 Henry III, No. 28. 



SBilUam De ^anttlupo. 

Writ dated at Westminster 15th October, 38 Henry HI [1254]. 

Gilbert de Finemor', Roger le C lacker, Richard Cusyn, Walter pistor, 
John de Brade/ord, Peter Mercenar' , William Reymund, Hugh de 
Blakelonde, Richard Miblaunk, Henry Ph. [sic], Henry Earths' 
(? Bartholomeiv), and William Ascer, who say that 

In the vill of Calne which was of William de Cantilupo, there 
are of rent of assize per annum 33X. id. ; and of tolls, chippingavel, 
and " Browyngavel" per annum, ;^4; of the issues of the mill per 
annum, 70J. 

There are there 5 acres of land and 3 acres of meadow, worth 
per annum bs. ; also 4 virgates of land called Bures, worth per 
annum 40J. ; also of the rents of the free tenants belonging to 



Inquisittones Post Mortem. 17 

Bures, per annum 20J. ; also of the foreign hundred, per annum 
40J. ; also of amerciaments and perquisites, per annum 20^'. 
Sum-total, /'is 9^. \d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 38 Henry III, No. 46. 



3!amej3 De button. 

Inquisition made before R. de Stepham, William de 
Clarendon, by command of the King, on the day of Holy 
Trinity, 39 Henry HI [1255], by the oath oi Richard de Molford, 
Henry le Dune, William Torgis, John Juvenis (?), Robert purstayn, 
John Frot, Walter son of Odo, Radulphus le Nevill, Ralph de la Bures, 
Walter Ernolf, Thomas de Raneford, and John le Walys, who say that 
James de Pulton held of the King in chief one virgate of land 
within the metes of the forest of Clarendon by the service of 
keeping the said forest by himself or by another horseman and 
2 servants on foot at his own cost ; the said virgate is worth 
per annum 8j. The said James held of the King in chief one 
virgate of land within the metes of the forest de la Bokolt by 
the service of keeping the bailiwick de la Bokolt by himself on 
horseback and by one servant on foot at his own costs, and by 
the service of zos. to be paid to the King's keeper of Clarendon. 

William de Putton is the son and next heir of the said James, and 
is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 39 Henry III, No. 24. 



2Billiam De Cantilupo* 

Writ dated at Westminster iSth November, 39 Henry HI [1254]. 

William de Calna, Sampson de la Boxe, Philip de Cumbeiwell, 
Gilbert de Finemore, William Clericus, Roger de Caleston, Roger le 
Draper, Richard de Wyke, Ralph de Barwyll, Henry Pinnok, Nicholas 
de Hedinton, and Philip de Berewyk say that 

William de Cantilupo held in chief of the King in the vill of 
Calne 25 messuages, 4 virgates of land called Bures, 4 acres of land, 
4 acres of meadow, one mill, the foreign hundred, the market-place 
of Calne with tolls and other customs ; it \sic^ is worth in all 
issues, as well in customs, etc., as in the services of the free 
tenants of his fee, ^'23 os. \d. and i lb. of pepper, by the service of 
£\% paid yearly into the King's Exchequer. 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. II- 3 

3 



1 8 Wiltshire 

The said William held the said vill of Calne of the King in fee, 
and not at the will of the King nor for the term of his life. 

A certain boy named George is his next heir, and is under the age 
of 3 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 39 Henry III, No. 38. 



malter De J^atelg. 

Writ dated at Clarendon 3 July, 40 Henry III [1256]. 

N3.mCS of those by whom is made the extent of the lands 
and tenements which were of Walter de Pavely in co. 
Wilts, to wit, Rotolinus de Bratton, Symon de Parco, Philip Marmion. 
Ralph de Stokes, Robert de Pluggonay, Walter Savile, William son of 
Henry, Hugh Galsiveyn, Ralph de Edindon, Herbert Styward, John 
Savari, Symon de Horkedal, and Roger de Godrug, who say that 

The said Walter de Pavely held in chief of the King the manor 
of Wesbury, to wit, Broc, HeveddingchuU Stokes, and Lilledon, by 
the service of one knight's fee. 

There are there of the rents of assize of the free tenants per 
annum, 6%s. \i\d.; of the rent of assize of customars per annum, 
£\. The commodity of tallage is worth per annum 40J. There 
are there in demesne i r carucates of land, each containing 
60 acres, whereof each acre is worth yearly 6d. Sum-total, /"18. 

There are there 71 acres of meadow, each of which is worth per 
annum 2s. Sum-total, £■] 2s. 

The commodity of the foreign hundred is worth per annum 6is. ; 
of the home \_intrinsete'} court, 20s. ; of the portmote, bs. 8d. ; 
of the fair newly granted, 6s. Sd. The pasture for oxen is worth 
per annum 44J. ; the pasture for cows, 6s. Sd. ; that for sheep, 
^"4 1 6s. Sd. The commodity of the park as in herbage and other 
things is worth per annum 40J. ; and of the wood, los. The 
garden with the easements of the houses is worth per annum 
66s. \d. The commodity of 3 dovecotes is worth per annum yj. 
The chersetum is worth per annum yj. $d. The market and 
heriot are worth per annum one mark ; the works and customs of 
villeins /"17 is. ^.d. per annum. There are there 2 chapels worth 
per annum £4.. Sum, /^-jb Ss. ohd. 

The said Walter de Pavely held of William de Pluggenet 2 carucates 
of land in the said manor of Westbury, by the marriage of his 
mother, and does no service for them; they contain 120 acres, 
each whereof is worth per annum 6/. Sum-total, 6qs. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 19 

There are there of the rents of assize of free tenants 46J. 7^. ; of 
the rents of assize of customars, 4^. 11^, The tallage is worth 
per annum 4J. The customs and works of villeins are worth per 
annum 34-f. M. There are there 9 acres of meadow, each whereof 
is worth per annum zs. : sum \%s. 

The pasture of the oxen is worth per annum 8j. ; that of the 
cows, 3^. 4</. ; that of the sheep, 25^. The commodity of the wood 
is worth per annum one mark. The chersetum is worth per 
annum \\d. The easement of the court with the curtilage is 
worth per annum \%d. Sum, £\\ os. Sd. 

The said Walter de Pavely held of the Prior of Fernlegh 2 virgates 
of land by the service of los. yearly, and are worth per annum ioj. 

Also of William Burnol 20 acres of arable land by the service of 
10^., each acre whereof is worth td.\ sum \os. Also of the same 
by the same service 10 acres of pasture, worth per annum 5^. ; 
also of the same by the same service 3 acres of meadow, worth 
per annum ts. There are there of rents of assize i is. per annum. 
Sum, 38^. 

Also of William Morin one messuage with a curtilage, paying 
nothing therefor ; it is worth per annum 1 8^. 

Sum of the sums, £"89 \%s. z\d. 

Reginald de Pavely, knight, is the son and heir of the said Wal/er, 
and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 40 Henry III, No. 41. 



Writ dated at Worcester 5th August, 40 Henry III [1256]. 

InC[UlSltlOn taken to ascertain whether the messuage in 
Marleborough which Richard Clericus formerly held of the 
grant of Robert de Muscegros, by the oath of Thomas Martyn, 
Sampson de Bavik, Thomas de la Grene, Thomas Wad', Gilbert Tripp, 
Stephen Vigerus, John Auri/aber, Robert de Sar, William Gervays, 
William Heved, Richard Clericus, and John Heny, who say that the 
said messuage is the escheat of the King and of the escheat of 
the Normans. 

The said Robert de Muscegros gave the said messuage by charter 
to the said Richard Clericus for \id. yearly, but before the said 
grant only %d. was paid yearly to the King. The said messuage 



20 Wiltshire 

is worth per annum 55-., with the said \id.^ and is now held by 
Stephen Fromund, the King's bailiff at Marleborough, after the 
itinerary of the justices at Wilton, 40 Henry III ;. before that 
time it was held by the said Richard Clericus. 

The jurors consider that the King can grant the said manor, 
being his escheat, at his will and pleasure. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 40 Henry III., No. 42. 



Writ dated at Westminster loth September, 40 Henry HI [1256]. 

T • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn taken by Sampson de Berewik, Thomas de la 

A Grene, William Heved, Robert de la More, Peter Parmentar, 

William takepain, William Tresor, Sampson Gorard, John Vsaac, John 

Hervi, Richard Clericus, and Richard de Winton, as to the escheats 

of the King in the borough of Marleborough, who say that 

That plot of land in the parish of St. Mary which Adam Pistor 
holds is the escheat of the King by the purchase of Thomas le Led, 
who died without heir ; it is worth per annum bd. beyond the King's 
rent of 2d. The plot which Adam Brictun now holds is the King's 
escheat by the like cause, and is worth per annum td. The 
half burgage in the said vill which is next to the land of Richard^ 
son of Adam Pistor, which was formerly of Walter Uggel, is the 
King's escheat by the like cause ; Adam de Rokel holds it, and it 
is worth per annum \zd. The half burgage which is in the west 
part of the said land is the King's escheat by the like cause ; 
Isahell Pel holds it now, and it is worth per annum \zd. The 
half burgage in the said vill which Stephen le Gras now holds is 
the King's escheat by the like cause, and is worth per annum 
%d. The house in the said vill which was of Robert Taburel is the 
King's escheat, because the said Robert is now a fugitive for 
trespass, and is now in the hands of the King's bailiffs ; it is 
worth per annum iid. The house in the said vill which was 
of Nicholas Baron and Eustace his brother is the escheat of the 
King, because they are fugitives for trespass ; Matilda, daughter 
oi Alan Morgan, now holds it, and it is worth per annum izd. 

The King may give away the same, saving only the right of 
the farmer of Marleborough, because Robert de Musscegros, farmer, 
gave those escheats in his time. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 40 Henry HI, No. 42. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 21 

Writ dated at Westminster 12th April, 41 Henry III [1257]. 

William Strug\ William de Bradeleg\ Geoffrey Huse, John de la 
Hide, John de Babinton\ Walter le Buteler, Peter de Kyngesmulle, 
Walter Huscarle, Thomas de Foxcote, Hugh Cocus, Robert le Savage, 
Matthew Turpyn, and Roger delyons [? de Lyons], who say that 

John de Munemuth held in chief of the King in the vills of 
Langeford and Grimstede 3 carucates of land, by the service of 
one knight's fee, and are worth per annum, clear, £1"]. 

Dame Albretha de Boterell and Dame Joan de Nevil are his next 
heirs, and are of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 41 Henry III, No. 3. 



Inquisition taken in the vigil of St. Matthew, 41 Henry HI 
[i 257], of the lands o[ Ernisius de Nevil. Richard de Bernejord, 
William de Berneford, Matthew Turpyn, Stephen Bruntmarston{}), 
Richard Aivelyne, John de Petit, Robert Besyn, Walter Hirdman, 
William le Lung of Aleton, John le Lung of Aldynton, William Le 
Frankeleyn, Matthew le Noble, say that 

Emisius de Nevil held of the King in chief in co. Wilts 
2 carucates of land in the vill of Durinton, worth per annum, 
c\e2Lr,£i$, by the service of one knight's fee. 

Gilbert is his son and next heir, and is aged 27 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 41 Henry III, No. 4. 



iStcl^arD i^ere? of aitoarDebur^* 

Writ dated at Merton 7th May, 41 Henry IH [1257]. 

Peter de Kyngesmulle, Hugh le Erie, John Sweting, Thomas de 
Kaneford, Waller Bede, Ralph de Nevill, John son of Eve, Robert 
Thurstayn, John Walys, Walter Tropenel, William Edmund, and 
Richard le Dun say that 

Richard de Herez held of the King in chief one virgate of land, 
by the service of zs. per annum ; it is worth per annum \os. ; also 
2 acres of land and 3 acres of meadow of the fee of Alice le 
Frensse, Robert Thurstayn, and Peter de Jeneyue; they are worth per 
annum 2s., saving the rent due. 

Ralph, son oi Richard de Heraz, is his next heir, and is aged 22 years. 
3 * Chan. Inq. p.m., 41 Henry III, No. 7. 



22 Wiltshire 

^gnejs peberell. 

Writ dated at Windsor 27th June, 41 Henry III [1257]. 

Richard de Harefeld, Walter de Forda, Richard Hamelin, Adam 
Clericus, Richard le Langer, Adam Saul, Gilbert le Maine, Simon le 
Noir, Richard Forestarius, William Elys, William Cupperland, Adam 
le Vrie, say that 

Agnes Pevrel held nothing of the King in chief in co. Wilts, but 
she held of Roger de Toenye one virgate of land in the vill of 
Nekton with a messuage, paying per annum is. ; the land is 
worth MS., and the pasture thereto belonging 28^.; also in the 
said vill of Dame Cristina de Harsefeld 2 virgates of land, paying 
therefor yearly zd. ; they are worth i6j. and the pasture -fj. ; also 
of Adam son of Eadmond in the vill of Chederinton ^ virgate of 
land, paying therefor yearly \s. ; the said land is worth 4J. and 
the pasture i zd. 

The said lands are in the hands of the King by the escheator. 

Thomas Pevrel is the son and next heir of the said Agnes, and is 
of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 41 Henry III, No. 20. 



^atnctu0 De cljatDttcjs. 

Writ dated at Selveston 23rd September, 42 Henry HI [1258]. 
[The extent of St«ndefti{?) i& illegible.] 

Extent of the land which was of Patricius de Chawrces in 
the vill of Stepillavinthon in co. Wilts, made there on 
Friday next after the feast of St. Leonard \_year not given'] before 
Sir Stephen de Melleford, coroner, and Richard le Rus, by the oath 
of Richard le Blund, Alexander de Estcote, Robert le Droys, Richard 
de Wyka, Nicholas de Cruc, Gilbert de Aula, Thomas de Wodebregg, 
William Morin, Henry Hervi, Lucas Culle, Herbert de Heya, John 
Clericus de Lavinthon, who say that 

There is there a certain long house in the place of a hall, and 
one room in one head, and another room in another head, and one 
outer room and one cowhouse, of the court and 2 small barns, and 
one sheepfold upon the hills, and all the said houses are old and in 
a bad state. 

There is there in the court a garden, a " servorium," and a 

1 - Lavintoa ? 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 23 

curtilage, worth per annum 7^. In the demesne of the said land 
there are 146 acres of arable land, not by the perch but as they 
lie, whereof each acre is worth per annum ifd. : sum 48^. %d. In 
the demesne of the said land are 4 acres of meadow, each whereof 
is worth per annum ztd. : sum 8j. 8^. There is there a several 
pasture called Shortemers, and another several pasture called 
Halvehyde which can feed \justiner\ 10 oxen in season; the 
pasture of each ox is worth bd. : sum 5^. They can have in the 
common pasture 300 sheep, and the pasture of each sheep is 
worth per annum ^d. : sum 12^. 6</. There is there a wood called 
Bruns, worth per annum \rd. Sum, £\ zs. lod. 

There are there 6 virgates of land in the tenure of the villeins, 
whereof each pays of rent of assize per annum los.: sum bos. 
Each owes the carriage of the corn and hay of the lord, which is 
worth per annum i zd. : sum 6^-. Each ought to carry the corn of 
the lord to the neighbouring market at the dinner \_prandium'] 
of the lord, and to ask for the same in the neighbouring markets 
like the said dinner, and the said service is worth besides the said 
dinner iid. : sum 6s. Each of them owes one penny at Hokeday, 
and another penny at the feast of St. Martin by view of frank 
pledge: sum i2(/. Sum, 73^. 

There are also in the said demesne 7 half-virgates of land 
whereof each pays of rent of assize per annum 3J. 4//. : sum 
2 3 J. \d. And each ought to pay to the lord at the feast of 
St. Martin 3 hens and i cock, worth i^d. : sum is. o\d. Also, 
each of them ought to pay at Hokeday id., and at the feast of 
St. Martin id. by view of frank pledge : sum i4</. Each of them 
who holds one whole virgate or half a virgate owes to the lord of 
aid at the feast of St. Michael yearly i mark, sometimes more 
and sometimes less, according to the will of the lord and their 
capabilities \_facultates'\. Each one who holds \ virgate, if he 
have a living beast shall give for herbage of the same at Hokeday 
id., and at the feast of St. Martin \d., and so per annum dd., 
because three of them have beasts, and if they have no living 
beast they shall give nothing. Sum, 33J. %\d. 

William Beaufiz holds one messuage freely, and pays therefor 
yearly td. and 1 lb. of cummin ; it is worth id. 

Basilia, who was the wife of William son of Roger, holds one toft 
at the will of the lord, and pays yearly i id. 

Robert de Lavinthon holds one messuage at the will of the 
lord, and pays yearly zs. 

Christiana la Custerere holds one messuage at the will of the 
lord, and pays yearly ibd. 



24 Wiltshire 

Roger Grenewey holds a certain part of land at the will of the 
lord, and pays yearly \\d. 

The said jurors estimated the pleas, heriots, reliefs, fines, for 
the marriages of their daughters, for their sons withdrawing from 
the demesne lord \_de dnts.~\, and all other perquisites in the said 
lordship, per annum \ mark : sum i is. %\d. 

Sum-total of the lordship, £\o is. ^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 42 Henry III, No. 26. 



Extent of the manor of Berewik, which was of Patricius 
de Chawrtes in co. Wilts, made there on Sunday in the 
vigil of St. Martin before Sir Stephen de Melleford, coroner, and 
Richard le Rus, by . . . de Rolneston, Edmund le Holde^ 
Waller de Rolneston, Walter le Frie 0/ May dint hon, John le Kuit {}), 
Robert de Tydelweshyde, Nicholas atte Halle, Hugh de Gares, Walter 
son of Hugh, Peter de Ingellam, Simon le Fraynche, William de Gares^ 
Peter de Halestone, who say that 

In the court of the said manor there is one hall, 2 rooms at 
one head of the hall near the land, and one room on the upper 
floor [stagium'], and a cellar underneath in another head, 2 barns, 
one cowhouse, one kitchen, and a stable, and they are sufficient 
and in good condition. 

There is there a garden, worth per annum %d. Also, they say 
that in the demesne of the said manor in the field towards the 
south are 99 acres of arable land by the perch. And in the 
north field 96 acres of arable land, each whereof is worth per 
annum 4^.: sum 65 j. In the said demesne are iii acres of 
meadow by the perch, whereof each acre is worth per annum 
idd. : sum 15J. ^d. 

There is there a pasture called Kyggesmers, and another called 
la Sterce, which ought to keep {^sustiner'] 40 oxen and cows, and 
the pasture for each beast is worth in season 4(/. ; in which pastures 
the free tenants of the said manor ought to have 24 beasts, and so 
there remains to the lord pasture for 16 beasts, worth per annum 

There can be had there pasture for 300 sheep, the pasture of 
each sheep worth per annum ^d. Sum, izs. 6d. 

There is there a common pasture which can keep [sustiner'] 
80 beasts, the pasture of each beast being worth 4^., in which 
pasture as well the free tenants as the customary ought to have 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 25 

48 beasts quit, and so there remains to the lord pasture for 
32 beasts, worth per annum \os. ^d.\ sum 109^. bd. There 
are there 5 half-virgates, whereof each pays of rent of assize 4^. ; 
sum zos. 

Also each owes a work in Autumn, to wit, from the feast of 
St. John the Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael, worth per 
annum i8</., besides the custom which they take from the lord: 
sum yj. bd. Also each ought to give to the lord in the feast of 
St. Martin 3 hens and i cock, price i\d.: sum \-i\d. 

There are there 2 cottagers who pay for their works per 
annum zs. Also each of them ought to give to the lord in the 
feast of St. Martin 3 hens and i cock, price 3^^. : sum -[d. 

There are there 3 ploughmen and one shepherd, each of whom 
holds the fourth part of one virgate of land, and pays for his works 
from the feast of St. Michael up to the feast of St. John the 
Baptist 2j. : sum %s. Also, for their works from the feast of 
St. John the Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael, 9^. : sum 3^-. 
Each of them to give to the lord in the feast of St. INIartin 3 hens 
and one cock, worth i\d. : sum 14^, All the aforesaid who hold 
half a virgate ought to give to the lord of aid per annum i mark, 
also of the pannage of pigs izd. Sum, 51J. ^^d. 

Henry de Auheneye holds in the said manor one hide of land and 
\ virgate of land freely, and pays therefor yearly one mark. 

Laurence Mokndinarius holds \ virgate of land and one mill 
freely for term of his life, and pays therefor per annum zzs. 

Agnes de Chawrces holds \ virgate of land freely for term of her 
life, and pays therefor per annum 4J. 

Robert Bercarius holds one messuage and one acre of land freely 
for term of his life, and pays therefor yearly zs. Also three 
cottagers pay to the lord 2^., at the will of the lord. 

Mabilia de Cantelo holds in the said vill the rent of 6oj. by 
exchange for term of his life, and pays yearly ^d. 

The jurors estimate the pleas, heriots, reliefs, fines, for 
marrying their daughters, withdrawing the men from the said 
manor, redeeming their lands after the death of their fathers, 
and all other perquisites in the said manor, zs. Sum, 45^-. ']d. 

The church of the said vill, which is estimated at 15 marks 
per annum, is in the gift of the lord of the said manor. 

Sum-total of the manor ;^io 6i-. i\d., and the advowson of the 
church except 6oj. of rent, which ought to revert to the said manor 
after the death of Mabel de Cantilupo. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 42 Henry III, No. 26. 



26 Wiltshire 



lBatriciu0 De CaDurcis* 

Extent of half a knight's fee in Standene, which at one time 
was held of Patricius de Chawrces, and is now in demesne, 
and of half a knight's fee in Hokhull, which the said Patricius held 
of William de Sto. Martina in co. Wilts, made there on Tuesday in 
the morrow of St. Martin before Richard le Rus and Richard the 
Clerk in the place of the sheriff, by Ralph de la Caolle, Roger Los, 
Philip Russel, William son of the clerk, Bartholomew de Cherlinthon, 
William le Paumer, John de Marisco, John le Fraunkeleyn, Richard de 
Ewelle, Geoffrey Leverir, John le veysin, Richard de la Barre, who 
say that 

In the court of the said manor there is one hall and one room 
with a wardrobe in one head \_capite'\ near the land, and in another 
head there are two sollars with a wardrobe and two cellars ; also 
one kitchen for brewing and baking, also one dairy \_dayeria'\, 
also one house for a stable in one head, and in another head is 
the granary ; also one house for pressing [ad pressoriH^ ; also 
two barns, one cowhouse, one sheepfold, and one henhouse : all 
the said houses are fit and sufficient. 

There is there a garden containing 3 acres 2^ poles, worth per 
annum in fruit i mark, and in herbage iid. ; also a curtilage 
containing i acre, where is situated a vine, and is worth in herbage 
per annum bd. There are there two curtilages, containing the 
fourth part of one acre, and are w'orth per annum 6d. Sum, Ss. Sd. 

In the demesne of the said manor there are 224I acres, not 
by the perch, but as they lie, whereof each taken one with another 
is worth per annum 3<f. : sum 61s. i|d. Also 9 acres of meadow, 
whereof each is worth per annum izd. : sum gs. Also a water-mill, 
worth to the use of the lord without dower \_sine dote'] per annum 
i8j. ; also a several fishery \_piscaria'], worth per annum 2s. ; also 
a several grove called Tredelham, worth per annum for the under- 
wood to be taken therefrom iid.; also a grove called Suthwode, 
wherein can be taken " Husbote and Heybote " 4 times yearly, by 
the delivery of the forester, worth per annum 4-^. ; also one several 
pasture called Hochule, able to sustain 16 oxen in season, the 
pasture of each ox being worth ^d. : sum 4_r. Also a common 
pasture called Isakesmers, wherein can be had pasture for 4 beasts, 
the pasture of each beast being worth per annum 3</. : sum izd. 
Also a pasture for sheep, which can maintain [sustiner'] 200 sheep, 
without 2 dowers, worth per annum 4J. id. Sum, ^4 igs. $id. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 27 

There are there 8 customary tenants who hold 68 acres of land, 
paying therefor of rent of assize per annum z\s. : 6 of the said 
customary tenants ought to reap in the autumn with 2 men for 
3 days, which service is worth per annum 6d. : sum 4-r. ; 2 of them 
ought to give to the lord for " Waldgavel" per annum iid.; 6 of 
them ought to give chercet, to wit, each of them 3 hens and one 
cock, worth ^^d. : sum 20^. ; each of thenl ought to carry the lord's 
hay for one day with one man, which service is worth by the 
day ^d. : sum ^d. ; 2 of them ought to plough one acre each, which 
ploughing is worth per annum bd. ; one of them ought to plough 
i acre, which ploughing is worth per annum ^d. Sum, 31J. "j^d. 

Geoffrey de Uppedune holds \ virgate of land freely, and pays 
therefor per annum is. \d. 

Richard de Ewelle holds \ virgate of land at the will of the lord, 
and pays therefor per annum 9^. \d. 

John de Columbers holds a marsh called Hochullemers, and pays 
for the same i lb. of pepper, worth td. 

The jurors estimate the pleas, heriots, reliefs, fines for marrying 
their daughters, etc. (as above). Sum, 14J. id. 

Joa?i, who was the wife of Hugh de St. Martin, holds the third part 
of the said half knight's fees in Standene and Hokhull, which ought 
to revert to the said manors after the death of the said Joan. 
Margaret, who was the wife of Peter, son of Hugh de St. Martin, 
holds the third part of 2 parts of half a knight's fee in Hokhull, in 
the name of her dower, which ought to revert as above. 

Hugh de Penedok holds half knight's fee of the manor of Standene, 
in Chigeliawee, in the said county. 

The chapel of the said manor is in the gift of the lord of the 
said manor, to which chapel belongs the moiety of the tithes of 
all the demesne of the said manor and 20 acres of land in the 
demesne ; also one acre sown with corn at the choice of the parson 
which shall not be manured or " peniata" (.?), and another acre of 
oats and the oblations of the court, but the lord of the said manor 
ought to pay to the Prior of Hokburne for his room of the said 
chapel per annum is., nor up to the present time can it maintain 
a chaplain. 

Sum-total of the half knight's fees in Standene and Hokhull, 
£"] I IS. 9^., and the advowson of the chapel except the said 
2 dowers which ought to revert as above and except \_preter'] the 
half knight's fee which Hugh de Pandole holds of the said manor. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 42 Henty III, A'^o. 26. 



28 Wiltshire 

milltani gjsiemberD- 

InQUlSltlOn taken on Thursday next after Low Sunday, 
44 Henry III [1260], in full court at Wilton, there being 
present the bailiffs and coroners of the said vill, by the oath of 
Gervase Carnifix, John Berie, Geoffrey Turand, Gilbert le Agulier, 
Terricus Vinet, William le May, Robe?-i Hod, John Azenild, Robert 
de Corecy, William le Casiere, William Fromund, John Huberd, 
William Auri/aber, William le Ctirteis, say 

There is a messuage in Wilton which William Ysemberd\ who 
was hanged for felony held there ; it was in the hands of the 
King of Germany for one year and one day of the gift of the King 
his brother, and he ought to answer therefore ; he held it of the 
heirs o{ John Ysemberd, and now the heirs of Walter Nosnich hold it 
of the gift of the said [_sic'\ John Ewestach, and of the said Walter 
Nosnich. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 8. 



rauitam pjsembern. 

Inquisition taken on Monday next after the feast of the 
Assumption of the Blessed Mar)', 43 Henry III [1259], by 
command of the King . . . bailiffs of the King of Germany in 
the liberty of Wilton, before the coroners and bailiffs of the said 
vill, by the oath of John Berte, Robert Spileman, Aljred Faber, John 
Comubiem, Gilbert le Agiler . . . Robert Hod, William le May^ 
Robert de Scerizie (?), John son of Alina, Alan le Specer, Robert de la 
Ma . . . , who say that 

Eleven perches of meadow in Wilton which William Fsemberd 
held [were in the hands oj] the King of Germany for one year and 
one day of the gift of King Henry his brother ; and that the said 
. . . . held the same of William Teobauld, and that Richard 
Fsemberd now holds them of ... . And the said Richard 
answered to the King of Germany for the year. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 8. 



cailltam p^emberD* 

Inquisition taken on the day of St. Paul, 43 Henry III 
[1259], by the oath of Henry Mangier, John Berte, John 
Thoremufid, Herbert Rujum, Geffrey Turod, Aljred Faber, Thomas 



Inquisitio7ies Post Mortem. 29 

le Mercier, Gilbert le Agulier, Gervase le Maieceren, Robert Spileman, 
William le Curteis, William le Or/eure, before the bailiffs and the 
keepers of the pleas of the Crown at Wilton, who say that 

William Ysemberd, who was hanged for felony, held one messuage 
in Wilton which was not in the hand of the King of England for 
one day and one year, but it was for one year and one day in the 
hand of the King of Germany because it is in the free borough of 
the latter. 

The said William held the said messuage oi Randle de Bedeford 
and his heirs, paying therefor yearly \ lb. of cummin, saving the 
service of the chief lord of that fee, and now it ought to be held 
by the said ^ lb. of cummin oi John de Bedeford. 

John Thuremund holds to farm the said messuage for 1 1 years by 
Sir Nicholas Burdun, chief lord of that fee, who had the year and 
day by the bailiff of the King of Germany, who ought to answer for 
the same (day and year). 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry II J No. 8. 



■ISegtnalD De iBermtaL 

Writ dated at Westminster 26th July, 43 Henry III [1259]. 

Thomas Bubbe, William Watir, William Henry, Reginald de Hette, 
Walter de Henley, Simon de Wrokeshal, William Gerard, Richard de 
Sokinvik, William de OJwell, William de Wormhirde, Thomas son of 
Peter de Wrokeshall, and John de Angul of Budeston, say that 

Reginald de Bernival held of the King in chief at Budeston the 
service of 7 hides of land, worth per annum £\i ^s. %d. Also in 
the vill of Segre 2 virgates of land of Simon de Segre whereof 
the said Reginald enfeoffed William de Cleremund, paying therefor 
yearly bd. or one pair of gilt spurs. 

Wolfram is the son and next heir of the said Reginald, and is aged 
15 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 9. 



ISicljarD De l^a^re^. 

I nCjUlSltlOn taken on Wednesday next after the feast of 

A St. Michael, 44 Henry HI [1260], by the oath of Walter 

Ede, Hugh le Vrie, Robert Trustayn, Richard le Duyn, Peter de 

Aylwardbury, Walter Ernald, John de Molendin, Henry le Vrye, 



30 Wiltshire 

Ralph Atebure, John Waleys, Thomas de Kaneford, and Matthew 
de la Forde, of the bailiwick of Clarendon, who say that 

Ralph de Hayres held of the King in chief 40 acres of land, price 
of each acre \d. ; 3 acres of meadow, price of the said 3 acres rs. ; 
and bs. rent, by the service of is. 9^. per annum ; also of the fee of 
William de Putton 3 acres, paying therefor yearly 15^/.; they are 
worth bd. beyond the rent ; also of the fee sometime of Peter 
Geneven 2 acres by the service of \d. yearly; they are worth per 
annum i zd. ; also of the fee of Robert Trustayn one acre of 
meadow by the service of \d. ; it is worth id. ; also of the fee 
of the Bishop of Salisbury 6^. rent in the vill of New Sarum. 

The daughter {not named'] of the said Ralph is his next heir, and 
is aged one year. Sum, 26^. <^d. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 19. 



2tice ue Columl)aruj5. 



I nqUlSltlOn made before Sir William de Kaune, escheator 
A in CO. Wilts, on Thursday next after the feast of St. Michael, 
43 Henry III [1259], by William Maleivain, Peter Bacun, Ralph le 
ApariU Richard Baxman, John Chauvin, Jordan de Grafton, John 
Veysin, Richard de la Barre, Elias Fretoxe, Henry de la Mare, Adam 
de la Mare, and William de la Mare, of the lands, tenements, and 
bailiwicks of the which Avice de Columharus was seised in her 
demesne as of fee on the day that she died in co. Wilts, how much 
she held of the King in chief, etc., who say that 

Avice de Columhariis held of the King in chief the forest of Chut 
in the said county and the moiety of the forester [forestar] of the 
bailiwick of Huppingescumbe towards the south, which moiety 
belongs to the said bailiwick of Chut, and the said bailiwick of 
Chut is worth together with the said moiety of Huppingescumbe 
60s., paying therefor yearly at the exchequer of the King together 
with the bailiwick in co. Hampshire 10s. She held no land of the 
King in chief in the said county, but the said Avice held of the 
Abbot of Hyde the manor of Chut, paying therefor yearly 6oy,, 
and the said manor is worth by the year ;^2o. 

Matthnv de Columbarl^s is the next heir of the said Avice, and is 
aged 40 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 20. 



Inquisitiones Post Moj^tem. 31 



^gne0 ne ^ancto iHauro. 

Inquisition made at Marleberge on the vigil of St. Katherine 
the virgin, 43 Henry III [1258], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Agnes de Rupedene, by Picot de Flexburre, Hugh de 
Quercu, Julian de Boxo, William Capper, Robert de Elicote, and 
William de Evesbury, senior, men of the King's barton, who say that 

The said Agnes formerly held half a hide of land which is worth 
per annum, clear, 5 marks, wherefor she paid at the castle every 
year of rent 8j., and this tenement is on the barton of the King, 
and A^icholas de Hampton holds it to farm. And the said Agnes held 
one hide of land in the vill of Manton for the which she paid to 
the templars i6j., and it is worth besides the rent 2\s. clear by the 
year, and is of the honor of Walingeford, and the said Nicholas 
holds that land to farm. 

Henry, son of Geoffrey de Sancto Mauro, is the next heir of the said 
Agnes, and is aged 30 years. Sum, £\ \os. Sd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 35. 



^gne0 tie ^ancto iHauro, 

Henry Croc, Elias de Kayllewei, Henry Arding, Henry de Burle, 
Thomas Bubbe, Richard Pain, Walter de la Sale, Micah le Eveske, 
Nicholas Lucas, Ralph le Page, Henry de Kancia, John le Champion, 
and James de Chippeharn, jurors, say that 

Agnes de Sancto Mauro held in chief of the King in the manor of 
Chippeham 2 virgates of land and 2 mills, and paid by the year 
to the King 52J., and they are worth per annum with the mills, 
rents, meadows, and pastures, clear, £\ i^s. od. 

The said Agnes held in the same manor of the King £jf i8j. 0^/. 
of rent, and paid so much by the year to the King, and they 
are worth by the )ear uiih the perquisites of tlie Court and other 
customs I i%s. 

The said Agnes held in the vill of Langele one hamlet \_hamellu7}i] 
of meadow o{ Jrhn Buret, and paid by the year 6d., and it is worth 
by the year 5^. 

The said Agn.-^ held in the said manor of Chippeham one hamlet 
\hamellum'\ of meadow of Thomas Bubbe, and paid by ihe year \d., 
and it is worth per annum ^s. 



32 Wiltshire 

The said Agnes held in the said manor ^ an acre of meadow of 
John de la Barre, and paid by the year 2d., and it is worth per 
annum bd. 

The said Agnes held in the manor de la Boxe 2 virgates of land 
of Sampson de la Boxe, and paid to the same by the year 1 5J., and 
they are worth in all issues of land 35J. 

The said Agnes held in the same manor one mill of the prior of 
Fernlegh, and paid to the same by the year los., and it is worth by 
the year 20s. Sum-total, ^13 19J. bd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No.-'^i). 



Cla abl)e00 of Hacocfe. 

Writ dated at Westminster 25th October, 43 Henry III [1259]. 

To the most excellent the lord H[enry], by the grace of God, 
King of England, etc., his devoted servant T. Gredley stnds gxtei\x\g. 

I send the meets and bounds by the which I have caused to be 
measured 40 acres of wood in your forest of Melkesham, by the 
oath of lawful men, by your command, to the use of the Abbess 
and convent of Lacok, to wit, from the hedge and ditch of 
Luntesleye, ascending by Wodnesdych as far as upon the way 
which is called le Haghestrete towards Chetewe, and from 
as upon the said upper way to Parva Heselwych to the ditch 
which is called Aldefrithesdych, and from the said Aldefrithesdych 
up to the said ditch and hedge of Lontesleye next Milestile 
on the south. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 43 Henry III, No. 42. 



gi^abella TBajs^er* 

Inquisition made at Mildehal on Saturday next, before the 
feast of St. Peter in Cathedra, 45 Henry III [1261], by 
William Cox, Richard Quiniyn, William de. Mory Willizrr. Cnspyn, 
John le Beter, Walter le Pik, John de Ryngeburn, Richard Teband, 
Adam de la Hull, John de la Mer, Walter de la Hampstall, and 
Ralph le Blund, before Sir Willia?n de Cann, escheator in co. Wilts, 
who say that 

Isabella Basset, lately deceased, held the manor of Mildehal in 
the said county in free marriage of the gift of Sir William de 
Ferers, her father, and held the said manor in chief of the 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 33 

Marshalsea. She did not hold any more in the said coimty 
except in her dower, and no service is held of the said manor, 
and the said manor is worth by the year in all issues of land £%^. 

William^ son of Reginald de Moun, is the heir of the said manor 
and of the said Isabella, and is aged 6 years. 

And whatever other land or tenements the said Isabella held in 
the said county she held of the dower of Sir Gilbert Basset. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 45 Henry III, No. 27. 



Writ dated at Westminster 8th January, 45 Henry III [1261]. 

I nqUlSltlOn made by the oath of Gerard de Cokar, Gilbert 
A de la Burton, Robert de Cynnock, Martin de Cokar, James de 
Monte Sorello, William Caye, Robert de Leg, John Pigaz, Tursteyn 
de Cynnok, William de Westanellde, Hugh de la Landsore, John 
de Cynnock, Richard Turlock, G. de Tintehull, William son of 
Rod", and William Brun, who say that 

Richard de Haselberg held the manor of Haselberg of the lord 
King John in chief, and in the time of the war he was against the 
King and committed felony, on account of which he was beheaded 
and hanged by his feet under the park of Syrebom. Sir John le 
Marescal, then keeper of the castle of Syreborne, took the said 
manor into the hand of the King. Afterwards the said King gave 
to the said John whatever he had in the said rr\^nor in the time of 
the said war, but whether he had a charter thereof from the said 
King they are entirely ignorant. 

William Marescall, son and heir of the said John, entered into the 
said manor after the death of the saidy<?^« his father. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 45 Henry III, No. 34. 



Cl^eobalD De Cngleiscl^etoll. 

Writ dated at Bath 2nd September, 46 Henry HI [1262], directed 
to the Sheriff of Wilts. 

InCJUlSltlOn made before the sheriff, escheator and coroner 
of the said county, by the oath of Thomas de Doddejord, 
Hugh de Doddejord, Robert Russel, Roger Pipare, Everard de Littlecote, 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. n_ 3 

k 



34 



Wills hire 



William Quyntyn, Geoffrey de Byngeham, Anketill Lydiard, William 
de Paris, Thomas de Blakingrave, Reyner de la Hoke, and Richard 
Gvandyn, who say that 

Teobaldus de Engleschevill enfeoffed William de Engleschevill of 
his full seisin of the manor of Wahull lo years ago, and the 
said William has remained thereof seised for those lo years and 
more, until the escheator of the county took that manor into the 
hands of the King on the occasion of the death of the said Teobaldus. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 46 Henry III, No. 6. 



Writ dated at Westminster 8th December, 46 Henry III [1261]. 

IT • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made by William Sandy, Michael de Cundesiun, 

A Ralph de Eyerdun, Ralph Le . . . , Nicholas Le . . . y 

Richard Michiel, Roger de Fonte, William de A^ousik, Waller de 

Pastura, Roger Juvenem, John de Aqua, Stephen . . . , who 

say that 

John Tilewine, Waller Magge, John Fur thing, and Adam Suede, who 
were taken and detained in the prison at Salisbur)' for the death 
nLJoJm, son of Stephen de Kymly, are not guilty of the death of the 
said John, and they were taken and detained because the inquisition 
said that they came to the house vhere John, son of Stephen, was 
killed by Robert de Fonte (?). 

The said Robert is guilty of the death of the said John, and 
no other. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 46 Henry III, No. 40. 



Writ dated at Westminster 8th January, 47 Henry HI [1263]. 

I nqUlSltlOn as to how much land Geoffrey Punsard held of 
X the King in chief, and how much of others, made by John 
Punzard, Gilbert de Sandon, Ralph de Hemne, John dc Asevil, William 
de la Curt, Peter Fareman, John le Teyntorer, Nicholas le Chapeleyn, 
Adam de Radejord, William Tropin, Nicholas le Eu, Robert Algard, 
and Robert le Veupre, who say that 

Geoffrey Punzard, deceased, held .... and of the fee 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 35 

of Cherleton at Dunmulne in co. Wilts, the third part of one 
virgate of land and one water-mill, paying to John de Chereburg 
id. by the year, and it is worth per annum 40J. 

William, son of Laurence, son of Geoffrey Punzard, if he be 
legitimate is the next heir of the said Geoffrey, and is aged 10 
. . . [documenl lorn'] . . . if he be legitimate or not. 

Sum-total, ;^4 i-js. lod. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Henry III, No. 16. 



9!oan ue iQebille. 

Writ dated at Westminster 20th January, 47 Henry III [1263]. 

InCJUlSl tlOn made before Sir William de Kalne, co-escheator 
of the King in co. Wilts, by the oath of John de Bahinton, 
Walter Huscard, David de Farlig, James de Monesterio, William de 
Pulton, Richard le Dun, Eudo de Poyivik, Adam son o{ Hur* de Knoel, 
Waller Wymund^ Nicholas de Aune, Geoffrey de Droys, and Robert 
Burdun, as to how much land Joan de Nevil held of the King in 
chief in co. Wilts, and how much of others, etc., who say that 

The said Joan held in chief of the King 2 carucates of land in 
Dune by the service of the third part of the third part of 2 knight's 
fees, and they are worth per annum, clear, ^15. She holds nothing 
of others. 

William de Sancto Martina is her next heir, and is aged 32 years. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Henry III, No. 18. 



iSobert ne Luc^ 

Writ dated at Westminster i ith March, 47 Henry III [1263]. 

Inquisition made before the sheriff of Wiltshire and Sir 
William de Calne, sub-escheator of the said county, by the 
oath of Walter de Esegrave, Thomas Attchulle, Simon de Esegrave, 
Richard de Lucy, Michael de Rossemer, Geoffrey de Trovoe, Robert 
Ruddue, Reginald de Eston, William Johan, Peter son of Richard^ 
Andrew de Berewyk, and Richard de Eerie, who say that 

Robert de Lucy held the moiety of the manor of Tollard in chief 
of Richard, formerly Earl of Gloucester, and the said moiety is 
worth per annum, clear, £2,. 



36 Wiltshire 

The custody of all that moiety after the death of Herbert, father 
of the said Robert, then being under age, by reason of the custody 
of the lands of the said Earl then being under age, and in the 
wardship of the King, was wholly in the King's hands for about 
three years, until that wardship was sold to Sir Geoffrey le 
ChamberUin. 

William Lungespeye used to take of the said Robert the fourth 
part of the service of one knight for scutage, but they do not 
know what it was taken of the manor of Tollard or of any other. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Henry III, No. 23. 



E 



^Robert De luc^. 

Writ dated 28th December, 47 Henry III [1262]. 

XtCnt made of the lands which were of Robert de Luci, by 
the oath of Peter de Hamme, Stephen Aurifahej; William 
Posthoke, Richard le Marchal, J. Nuiman, Hugh de Dudesbiri, William 
Viting, Simon de Hame, Robert de la Bere, J. Cockerel, Henry de 
Tollard, Robert de Burci, who say that 

The said Robert held in his demesne on the day that he died 
100 solidates of land in Hamme in chief of the Earl of Gloucester y 
and 40 solidates of land in Fornam of the said Earl ; and 40 
solidates of land in Stubhamtune and Tarente, of the said 
Earl ; and 4 librates of land in Tollard of the said Earl ; and 
the fourth part of one fee in Upvinborne of the said Earl, but 
William le Brut held the same of the said Robert by inheritance ; 
and the said Robert held the said tenements and other fees in the 
counties of Devon and Cornwall, which are held of him, of the said 
Earl by the service of 2 fees and a half. And he held in demesne 
4 librates of land in Tollard of Matilda Lungespel^e by the service of 
the fourth part of one fee. And he held 2 virgates of land which 
are worth 4^. of the Abbess of S^/'ton by socage. And he^ held 
2 marks of land in J^huretelle of the Countess of Lincoln by the 
service of the fourth part of one fee. And he held 3 virgates of 
land which are worth 20s. in Uptone of the Abbess of Viltonie by 
the service of serjeanty. 

Robert, son of the said Robert, is his heir, and will be aged 12 
years on the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist next 
coming, to wit, in the 47th year of King Henry HI. 

Alice, who was the wife of the said Robert, is not dowered thereof. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Henry III, A^. 23. 



Inqtiisitiones Post Mortem. 37 

'BalDtDinug ue Singula, cBatl of ?^ebon* 

Writ dated at the Tower of London, 13th July, 47 Henry III [1263]. 

Inquisition of the manor of Parva Fakeham made by Sir 
Eustace of Beringham, John de Stafiton, William son of 
Robert de Bordewell, John de Livermere, Roger Aspolon, Robert ultra 
aquam, Girard del Bek, Roger de Freton, John Marescall, Salomon de 
Ingham, Ralph son of Simon, John de Sanham, and Walter le 
Despenser, who say that 

Baldewinus de Insula, formerly Earl of Devon, recovered the said 
manor wholly before Sir Gilbert de Preston, and was put in seisin 
thereof from the day of St. John the Baptist in three weeks, and 
was in full seisin thereof until he enfeoffed thereof Sir William de 
Wysery. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Henry III, No. 32. 



^ (iE>ile0,/'Bt33]^op of ^altjsbur^- 

Writ dated at Westminster 2nd February, 47 Henry HI [1263]. 

InCjUlSltlOn to ascertain if Giles, formerly Bishop of Sarum^ 
obtained 18 librates of rent in the city of Sarum, and 2 hides 
of land in Lavynton Episcopi, and one hide of land in Wausinge, 
and 2 hides of land in Hertleye and Berewefeld, and 3 acres of 
land in Develys, together with the advowson of the Church of 
Meleborne, and 2 acres of land in Alyngton with the advowson 
of the church of the said vill, and one acre of land in Wandiz 
together with the advowson of the church of the said vill, and 
assigned them to the house of St. Nicholas de Valle Scolarium 
at Sarum, and enfeoffed the said house of the said lands and 
tenements, for the support of the said scholars, etc., etc, made 
by Reginald de \Vych, mayor of Sarum, Gilbert Chynne of the 
same, Richard de Aune of the same, William Aubyn of the same, 
Roger de Stokes of the same, Robert Eles, Hamon de Lysewys of 
the same, Hur' le Dun of the same, Ralph de Flore of Lavynton, 
Peter de Lavynton, William de Perham of the same, Robert de Munden 
of Schyreborn, Robert de Dunton of the same, Johji Caunremy of the 
same, and William de Nyweham of the same, who say that 

Giles, formerly Bishop of Salisbury, had obtained 18 librates of 
rent in the city of Sarum, 2 hides of land in Lavynton Episcopi, 
.4 * 



38 Wiltshire 

one hide of land in Wasing, 2 hides of land in Herlleye and 
Berewefeld, and 3 acres of land in Develys, together with the 
advowson of the church of Meleborn, and 2 acres of land in 
Alyngton together with the advowson of the church of the said 
vill, and one acre of land in Wandiz, with the advowson of the 
church of the said vill, and assigned them to the house of 
St. Nicholas de Valle Scolarium at Sarum, and enfeoffed the said 
house of the said, lands and tenements for the support of the 
said scholars, and appointed Sir John de Holtehy to be warden in 
that house to dispose of the same before his last crossing over 
the seas into France with the King, and the said Sir John as 
warden of the said house before the death of the said Bishop was 
in seisin of the said lands and tenements. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Henry III, No. 38. 



€jctent of tl)e apanor of Creftelane. 

Extent of the manor of Crckelade made on Tuesday next 
after the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 47 
Henry III [1263], by the underwritten: David de Hereford, Gilbert 
le Somenor, Roger Siivard, Peter le Ferar, Nicholas Laurence^ and 
Peter le Fuler. In the demesne there is nothing. 

John Corbin holds one burgage, and pays by the year is. at the 
two terms of the year, viz. at Hockday iid. and at the feast of 
St. Michael iid., and he makes suit at the hundred. 

William Faber holds 2 burgages and pays by the year 4?. at 
the same terms. 

The same Williajn holds one workshop and pays by the year 
lid. at the same terms. 

Henry Decanus holds one burgage and pays by the year i%d. 
at the same terms. 

Thomas de la Grave holds one burgage and pays by the year 
\bd. at the same terms. 

Walter Bone holds one burgage and pays by the year \bd. at the 
same terms. 

Alice Pedele holds one burgage and pays by the year ibd. at the 
same terms. 

William B . . . holds one burgage and pays by the year 
ibd. at the same terms. 

Reginald Lovekoc holds .... burg . . and pays by 
the year zs. at the same terms. 



Inqiiisitiones Post Mortem, 39 

Nicholas Aurifaber holds .... burg . . and pays by 
the year zs. at the same terms. 

Walter de Hamenen holds .... burg . . and pays by 
the year is. 6d. at the same terms. 

Stephen Ftillo holds half a burgage and pays by the year %d. at 
the same terms. 

Laurence Skod holds one burgage and pays by the year 8^. at 
the same terms. 

Matthew de Hereford holds one burgage and pays by the year 
15^^. at the same terms. 

Richard Tinctor holds one burgage and pays by the year lod. at 
the same terms. 

Williani de Covele holds one burgage and pays by the year i\d. at 
the same terms. 

William Tinctor holds one burgage and pays by the year is. at 
the same terms. 

The same William holds one plot \^placeani\ and pays by the 
year i^d. at the same terms. 

John Parnele holds one plot and pays by the year ^d. at the 
same terms. 

EV Carnifex holds one plot and pays by the year \d. at the 
same terms. 

Walter Dabeleiwonte(J) holds one plot and pays by the year 
i^d. at the same terms. 

Thomas Grene holds one plot and pays by the year id. at the 
same terms. 

fohn de Stratton holds one plot and pays by the year id. at 
the same terms. 

William de Halweston holds one workshop and pays by the year 
bd. at the same terms. 

The relict of N. de Baddehur holds one workshop and pays 
by the year bd. at the same terms. 

Also Matthnv de Hereford holds one burgage and pays by the 
year 3^. id. at the same terms. 

William de Merston holds one burgage and pays by the year is. 
at the same terms. 

The relict of Adam le Mercer holds one burgage and pays by the 
year 1 id. at the same terms. 

Nicholas Tike holds one burgage and pays by the year iid. at the 
same terms. 

Henry Ahbod holds one burgage and pays by the year \id. at the 
same terms. 



40 Wiltshire 

Margaret Alleyse holds one burgage and pays by the year ^d. at 
the same terms. 

Nicholas Wymarke holds one plot and pays by the year \d. at the 
same terms. 

John Affelme holds one burgage and pays by the year i zd. at the 
same terms. 

Robert le Mercer holds one burgage and pays by the year zs. at 
the same terms. 

Daniel de Hereford holds one burgage and pays by the year zs. id. 
at the same terms. 

Gilbert le Somener holds one burgage and pays by the year zs. at 
the same terms. 

The relict of iV. de Baddebury holds one burgage and pays by the 
year zs. at the same terms. 

The Prior of the hospital holds one plot and pays by the year ^d. 
at the same terms. 

Walter de Ameneye holds a certain tenement and pays by the year 
I lb. of pepper at the Nativity of the Lord, of the price of M. 

William Spaci holds a piece of ground \sondam] and pays by the 
year i lb. of cummin at the feast of the blessed Matthew, of the 
price of \\d.' 

EV Carnifax holds a piece of ground \jondani\ and pays by the 
year i lb. of cummin at the same term, price \\d. 

Richard Gildulf {}) holds as much and pays as much at the 
same terms. 

John Affelme holds as much and pays as much at the same terms. 

William .... holds as much and pays as much at the 
same terms. 

Sum, 49J. bd. 

Of Richard de la Hyde, ^d. at the feast of the Blessed Michael of 
Chepingavel. 

Of Roger Laxare, ^d. at the same terms. 

Robert Laurence, z^d. at 2 terms of the year, viz. at Hockeday i\d. 
and at the feast of St. Michael \\d. 

Of William de Halweston, z^d. at the same terms. 

Of William Heyware, id. at the same terms. 

Q{ Roger de Berebiry, ^d. at the same terms. 

Of Robert de Spitele, ^d. at the same terms. 

Of Adam Nittingale, sd. at the same terms. 

Oi John Nittingale, 5^. at the same terms. 

Of William Wyleby, ^d. at the same terms. 



Inqtiisitiones Post Mortem. 41 

0{ Michael Ymeke, ^d. at the same terms. 

Of Richard Tinctor, ^d. at the same terms. 

Of Roger le Taplur, ^d. at the same t^rms. 

Of William Wyser, ^d. at the same terms. 

0{ Christopher de Certere^ id. .... \_toni aivay\. 

Oi Henry Host, ild. . . . . 

Of Stephen Pellitar, z^d 

Oi Nicholas Tike, z\d 

Of Henry Abbod, z\d 

Of William Elys, ^d. . ... . 

OfRo' . . . . 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 47 Hni. Ill, No. 43. 



3ame0 l^eojse* 

Inquisition made in full court before the sheriff and the 
keepers of the pleas of the Crown on Tuesday next before 
. . . . Clement, 48 Henry III [1263], by the oath of Thomas 
Bubbe, Michael le Eveske .... Roger Kyngeman, Terrice de 
Chippam, Roger Skoi, Gilbert Oliver, Simon de Wro . . . . le 
Marchaimt, Reginald le Mareschal, William le Syur, and William 
Fraunkeleyn, whether the rents in Chippenham which. James Heose 
held of the King in chief on the day that he died are the escheats 
of the King, so that he may give them to whom he will without 
injury of any, who say that 

The said 7 librates of rent are of the ancient rent of the 
demesne of the King, and that the said fames held the same 
of the King in chief for his life only, and that after the death 
of the said James the King by his charter enfeoffed Agnes de 
[_Sancto Mauro^ and her heirs of the said rent, paying therefor 
yearly to the King £-j los., saving moreover to the King that 
often as his demesnes were tallaged throughout England [he 
should receive talljage of those who are bound to pay the said 
rent to the said .i4^«<'j' and her heirs as of his .... he ought 
and is w-ont to have. And in this way the said £-j los. are the 
escheats of the King as of his own demesne. And they understand 
that [the King may] give the said £j 10s. to whomsoever he will 
without injury to anyone. 

They say that Sir Henry de Sancto Mauro, son and heir ol Agnes 
de Sancto Mauro, now holds the said ^7 lo^'. of rent. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 48 Henry III, No. 38. 

' The rest of the document is torn away. 



42 J I lit shire 

Writ dated at Westminster 8th January, 49 Henry III [1265]. 

TnlS is the inquisition made by 12 jurors of the hundred 
of Westbury, viz., James de Lya, Reginald de Uplun, John 
soa of Thomas, John Rese, Richard de Siok, John Saueri, John de 
Holeweye, John Michil, William Colsuein, Walter Horsetitun, William 
Grufiny, and William Hendiman, who say that 

Thomas Danesy held nothing in chief of the King in the hundred 
of Westbury, but he held of Richard Da?iesy one virgate of land in 
Dultun for is. and i lb. of pepper, and zs. Sd. for the serjeanty of 
the King, and it is worth per annum, clear, bs. 

Moreover, the said Thomas held of the Prior of Stioentun one 
virgate of land and 6 acres for gs. ^d., and they are worth per 
annum, clear, i^s. 

Bartholomew, son of the said Thomas, is his next heir and is 
aged 15 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 49 Henry III, No. 7. 



Cjctent of tl^e apanor of C^meU 

Wilts. Hundred of Kaln. Extent of the manor of Cyrie 
which was o{ John son oi John, made by 12 jurors, viz'.,' 
Roger le Bland, Gilbert le Rohbe, Henry Bartolom, Waller de Litleton, 
Richard Norman, Robert Dayvile, Richard de la Ford, Gilbert de 
Fynemora, Thomas Smaleman, Hugh le Nytve, Hugh de la Blakelond, 
and Hugh Selere, on Wednesday next before the feast of St. Dionisius, 
49 Henry III [1265]. 

The jurors say that in the whole demesne of Cyriel there are 
2,272 acres, of the which there are sown in one year 102^ acres 
and in another year 125 acres, price of each acre \od. Sum, £() gs. ^d. 

The lord has in the meadow of Aubred 12 acres of meadow, and 
each acre is worth \%d. And at Phippesdene 8 acres, price of the 
acre \%d. And at Thasewarde 3 acres i rood, price of the acre \%d. 
Sum, \fis. \o\d. 

The lord has of common pasture of the beasts of his men there 
on the hill the ploughing of 18 acres, and each ploughing of each 
acre is worth 3^. The pasture de la Gore, being several, contains 
20 acres, price of the acre \d., and this pasture can sustain by the 
year 16 sheep. And in the whole hill which is called Oldebyri, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 43 

Cunibes, Herlesdune, and Heydiinc, there are 200 acres by the 
lesser hundred, and this pasture can sustain by the year 500 sheep, 
and the pasture of each sheep is worth \d. Sum, 6oj. 4</. 

The garden with the herbage is worth 55. in common years. 
Sum, 5^. 

The mill is worth us. \d. Sum, 33^. \d. 

The dovecote is worth 2^. i\d. per annum. Sum, 2^. \\d. per 
annum. 

Walter Remund holds one virgate of land, paying therefor yearly 
I lb. of cummin, which is appraised at \\d. for all service. 

The relict of Remiind holds one virgate of land at the will of the 
lord, paying by the year los. for all service. 

Thomas son of Haivisia holds one virgate of land at the will of 
the lord, paying by the year 20^-. and i lb. of pepper, which is 
appraised at td. and at the 4. terms of the year. 

Roger Pipard holds 2 virgates of land, paying therefor yearly in 
the term of Easter i>d. for all service. 

Richard and Walter de la Penne hold \ a virgate of land at the 
will of the lord, paying by the year s^-. for all service. Sum of the 
free tenants, 46^'. \\d. 

Walter de la Slog holds one virgate of land, paying by the year 
\os. at the 4 terms of the year, for the which he is held to harrow 
\ acre at the Winter sowing and another \ acre of the Lent, which 
is worth i(/., he ought also to carry one hurdle on the hill and 
carry it back, which is worth a farthing, and also to find the fourth 
part of one cart at the 2 terms of the year to carry brushwood 
\busca^ once in the day, which is worth zd., also to wash and shear 
the sheep of the lord twice, which is worth k/., and to weed the 
corn of the lord for half a day, which is worth ^d., and to raise 
and take away the hay in the meadow, which is worth i</., and 
to find the half of a cart to carry the said hay for 2 days, by 3 turns 
in the day, which is worth i\d., and he ought also, with 2 men, to 
reap the corn of the lord 6 times in the Autumn, which is worth 
\id. at the food of the lord, viz., each of them shall have one loaf 
by the day, such as 6 can be made of a bushell, also one day of 
these 6 days they shall have meat and ale in sufficient quantities, 
but on the other days they shall have a companage of wine, 
price \d., and he shall find half a cart every day throughout the 
Autumn to carry the lord's corn until it is all carried, and each cart 
shall have every day 4 sheaves of corn selected and of the best. 

Also Walter Anketil in the same way as is aforesaid. 
Walter le Vale as the aforesaid. 

John Acer in the same way. 



^4 Wiltshire 

Alice, the relict o{ Peter the Clerk, in the same way. 

Richard Upehulle in the same way. 

Herbert le Berchir in the same way. 

Nicholas Menseke in the same way. 

Williatn Basset as the others. 

Emma, the relict o'i Roger Juvenis, in the same way. 

Matilda, the relict of the Provost, in the same way. 

John Bissup in the same way. 

Richard the Provost in the same way, except while he remains in 
the office of Provost, but when he remains he gives 5-f. by the year, 
who shall receive a certain best acre sown with wheat in the place 
of his stipend ; at the same time he shall have one cart-horse for the 
whole year at the cost of the lord, which shall be at the food of the 
lord for the whole Autumn. 

Sum of the holders by the rod, £1 ^s. 

Walter Suphurde holds \, a virgate of land, paying ^s. by the year 
at the 4 terms of the year, and shall give to the lord 3 hens and 
one cock at the feast of St. Martin, and they are worth 3^^/., and 
ought also to harrow twice as is aforesaid, which is worth \d., 
and to cover 5 " cleydas " of the fold of the lord, which is worth \d., 
and he ought to carry and take back one hurdle, which is worth \d., 
and he ought to find one ox to carry the brushwood twice in the 
year, which is worth \d., and he ought to wash and shear the lord's 
sheep for 2 days, which is worth \d., he ought also to weed for 
\ a day twice, which is worth \d., and he ought to mow the lord's 
meadow for one day at the food of the lord, which is worth id., 
and he shall take one parcel of herbage on the second day as much 
as he can raise at once with his scythe. He ought to raise and 
take away the hay in the demesne meadow, which is worth \d. for 
2 days. A.nd he shall take equally with his fellows below written 
one sheep from the fold of the lord and one cheese on the same day 
made in ihe lord's dairy. He ought to stack the lord's hay in the 
court, which is. worth \d., and he ought to reap the lord's corn in 
the same way as Walter de la Sloy, and that service is worth \id. 

Johti de Pulle holds \ a virgate of land in the same way. 
Cristina, relict of William, holds in the same way. 

Emma, the relict of Humphrey, holds in the same way. 
Walter, son of Walter Suphurde, in the same way. 

John Messor holds in the same way. 

William Faber holds ^ a virgate of land by the said rent and 
service, but if he will not do that service or pay the rent he ought 
to buy new iron for 2 ploughs and to maintain it in all respects 
with all things necessary for the whole year at his own cost, 



Inqiiisitiones Post Mortem. 45 

and ought to find the iron of the mill except the shaft spindle 
\_pusillu\ of the mill, which the lord ought to find and maintain ; 
and if he will do it he shall pay \zd. by the year, and he ought to 
maintain one cart-horse of the lord for the whole year at his own 
cost, as well in irons as in nails. 

Sum of the half-virgates, \zs. 9^. 

Richard de Ramesham holds the cotsethla of land for ^s., to be 
paid at the 4 terms of the year, he also owes one cock and 3 hens^ 
which are worth i\d., and he ought to cover 5 hurdles of the fold,, 
which is worth \d. He ought also to carry and to take back one 
hurdle of the fold, which is worth \d. And he ought to wash and 
shear the sheep, which is worth \d. He ought -to weed, which is 
worth \d., he ought to harrow and to carry the hay, which is worth 
\d., and he ought to reap the corn with 2 men like the said Walter ^ 
which is worth \rd. 

Richard Moletid' holds in the same way. 

Walter Molendinar' in the same way. 

Peter Wudezvardus in the same way. 

Cristina Snelling in the same way. 

Richard de la Penne in the same way. 

Walter de la Penne in the same way. 

Robert Turpin in the same way. 

William Balhaver in the same way. 

Geoffrey Snellitig in the same way. 

Walter Snelling in the same way. 

Adam de la Penne in the same way. 

Sum of the cotsethla, 54-r. qd. 

Walter de Tunesend holds one croft and one acre of land at the 
will of the lord for 2^. by the year. 

Thomas Cholier\\o\diS, one croft and ^ acre of land for i6d. at the 
will of the lord by the year. Sum, 3^-. \d. 

The lord has in the demesne of Kuwich 51 acres i rood of 
arable land, whereof 25 acres are sown in one year and 26 acres 
I rood in the other year, and each acre is worth bd. Sum, 255'. 6d. 

There are there 55 acres of meadow and each acre is worth 8r/. 
Sum, ^s. M. 

There are there loi acres o*" pasture and each acre is worth 6d. 
Sum, ^s. ^d. 

Also there the lord has in the forest of Chippeham 40 acres 
I rood of wood which are worth by the y ir zs. 6d. Sum, 2s. 6d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court are appraised at ^s. by 
the year by tnv., v^idi^t of the jurors. Sum, 4J. 

Sum of the sums, £^^ 10s. g^d. 



46 Wiltshire 

The rent of this instant term of St. Michael is in excess of the 
sum of;^3 1"]$. "jld., which Roger de Clifford, who has no land or 
tenements within the county, Tevied by his bailiff. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 49 Henry III, No. 29. 



The lands of those who adhered to the adversaries of 
the King in the Hundred of Swanebergh. 

m\\i%. l^unnren of ^toaneberg]^- 

InCJUlSltlOnS and extents made before William de Kaune 
and Adavi de Madine, 49 Henry III [1264-5], of the lands of 
the adversaries and rebels of the King, and also of those who 
openly adhered to the said adversaries, by the oath oi Peter de Ore, 
Walter Page, William Cok of Upaven, John Edwine, Hervicius de 
Maniggeford, William Edmund, John EdmuTid, John Claintie, William 
Cok of Cherleton, Richard Burner, and John de Aqua, who say that 

Richard de Borard, who was with Robert de Ros, held in the vill of 
Rusteshal 2^ hides of land, which are worth per annum 16 marks, 
saving the service of Alexander de Alnett, the chief lord. The rent 
of this present term of St. Michael exceeds 8 marks. 

John, son of John, who was in the battle of Evecham, had in the 
same bailiwick the advowson of the Church of Wodbere, with the 
wards and escheats of the freemen of the same vill holding by 
knight's fees, which are worth per annum ^ mark. 

Bartholomew de \VyvelesJord, bailiff of the Earl of Herejord, who 
seised into the hands of the said Earl 2 carucates of land in 
Maniggeford which were of John de Bohun, son of the said Earl, 
and 2 carucates of land in Wyvelesford which were of John de 
BohuHy brother of Francis de Bohun, would not permit the said 
manors to be seised or extended. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 49 Henry III., No. 30. 



Cl^e Mug. 

Writ dated 13th May, 52 Henry HI [1268]. 

William son of Walter, Richard Enok, Gilbert de Aula, William 
Gule, Geoffrey le Blund, Luke Culle, John de Wodebrigge, William 
Moryn, John Cambo, Robert brother of the priest, Bartholomew de 
Ethelhampton, and William Mahvayn, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 47 

Nothing certain belongs to the bedelary of the hundreds of 
Swaneberwe, Ruebergh, and Stodford, except that which the men 
of the same hundreds wished to give to the bedel of the said 
hundreds of their grace, which grace is worth by the year 20J. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 52 Henry III, IVo. 20. 



Concerning tl)e IRepairjs of tl^e 'BriDge of 
^arum* 

Writ dated at Clarendon 21st December, 52 Henry III [1267]. 

The King commanded his justices in eyre at Wilton diligently to 
enquire whether the Abbess of Schafton oUght to repair and was 
wont to repair a certain bridge and gate within the castle of Sarum, 

Inquisition made by the oath ol John de Bathampton, 
William le Droys, Sampson de la Boxe, Ralph de Pauleshunte^ 
Warand de Bluntcsdon, Stephen de Brilmereston, John Aucher, Jordan 
de Laiierkestok, Geoffrey House, William le Botelcr, William Aujrey of 
old Sarum, Peter de Kingesmelne, William de Putteton, and Henry le 
Dun, who say that 

William Lons espeye Earl of Sarum in the time of the war, to 
wit, in the time of King John, father of the King that now is, who 
then held the Castle of Sarum, then for the first time distrained 
Mary, then Abbess of Schafton, once, viz., to repair the said bridge. 
They also say that 

Nicholas de Lustreshull, during the time that he was sheriff of 
Wilts, distrained once in the time of the vacancy of the said abbey 
to repair the said bridge, and took by that distraint from the said 
house of Schafton loo^y. And the jurors being asked whether the 
said Abbess or her church of Schafton has any land, rent, or 
tenements by reason that they are held to repair the said bridge 
or gate, say No. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 52 Henry III, No. 24. 



faatriciu^ De Cauurctiei or mmztm oe 
ailjintaco^ 

Writ dated at Westminster 14th January, 52 Henry III [1268]. 

InqUlSlwlOn made before the justices in eyre at Wilton, 
in CO. Wilts, by the oath of William son of Walter, Geoffrey 
le Chamberleng, John de Langejord, John de Babinton, Robert le 



48 Wiltshire 

Chamberleng, William Gerard, Adam de la Onolle, Robert Colle, Robert 
Gerard de Bereford, John de Wyli, Nicholas de Boneleston, Nicholas 
Burdein, Robert Schyreman, Peter Orey, John le Hoy, Ralph Lo"^ 
of Couneleston, Nicholas Frankelani of Couneleston, and Robert de 
Lustehulle, who say that 

King Henry, grandfather of the King that now is, gave the 
manor of Wicheford to a certain Patricius de Cadurcis, with sole 
and sale, toll and team, and infangethef, and all customs as the 
King held that manor in his demesne. And the said Patricius held 
the said manor with all the liberties for a long time until he gave 
the same to Henry de Albiniaco with all the said liberties, which 
said Henry held the said manor all his time without contradiction 
of any. After the death of the said Henry, Robert, his son and heir, 
held the said manor at his right and inheritance quite peaceably 
until he gave the same to Nigel de Albiniaco, his younger brother, 
who was in full and peaceable seisin thereof for all his time, and 
held the said manor and the liberties and customs thereof without 
the sheriff of Wiltshire or any bailiff or minister of the King 
having ingress into the same. After the death of the said Nigel, 
William de Albiniaco, brother and heir of the said Nigel, held the 
said manor as his right and inheritance for his whole life without 
any disturbance, as freely, quietly, and peaceably as the said Nigel, 
his father, held the same. After the death of the said William, 
Henry de Albiniaco, son and heir of the said William, held the said 
manor as his right and inheritance with all the said liberties and 
free customs, without any suit to be made by him or his heirs of 
the said manor at the county or at any hundred, and without the 
sheriff or any bailiff of the King having ingress therein, as freely 
and peaceably as his said predecessors freely held the same, up to 
the death of William Lungesf , then Earl of Sarum, and until Robert 
de Hales, then sheriff and farmer of the county of Wilts, without 
just cause by his power entered the said manor of Wicheford, and 
in the same where before in the time of the said ancestors of 
Albiniaco there used to be only one sole tything as well of the fee 
o^ Albiniaco as of the fee of Fanecurt, which tything did not make 
any suit elsewhere, except at the court of those of Albiniaco in the 
said manor. The said Robert de Hales, then sheriff of Wiltshire, 
caused 2 tythings to be made there, and distrained them with the 
men of the said manor to make suit at the hundred of Sir R. de 
Brenchebery (or the hundred of the lord the King of Brencheberg) 
[ad Hundr dni r. de Brencheberg] then for the first time, and 
he took of the men of the said manor amends of his power of bread 
and ale to be sold contrary to the assize, effusion of blood and hue 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 49 

raised, and certain other trespasses, all which amends altogether 
belonged before to the said predecessors o{ Albiniaco from time 
immemorial. And they say that the sheriffs of Wiltshire, after the 
intrusion made by the said Robert de Hales in the said manor as is 
aforesaid, now take 6j. by the year of that tything which is of 
Fanecurt, taking nothing of the tything of Albintaco, except only 
the said amends and the said suit as is aforesaid. 

And they say that Walter de Albintaco, son and heir of the said 
Henry de Albintaco, now holds the said manor by right of inheritance, 
and does no suit at the county or at any hundred. And he has his 
gallows and stake in the said manor. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 52 Henry III, No. 35. 



iSobert (0utnat* 

Extent made of the lands and tenements of Roger de Gurnay 
in CO. Wilts, on Sunday next after the feast of St. Augustine 
at Sermecote, 53 Henry III [1269], before Sir Elias Kotel, sub- 
escheator of the said county, by Thomas de la Postern, Roger de 
Molendin\ Philip de Molendin\ Thomas de Sconerston, Henry le Walays, 
Hamond{?) de Ley grave, Robert de Aula, John deLeytreton,JohnBarbofte, 
William de Suthsynton, Roger de la Putte, and William de la Puiie, 
who say that 

Robert de Gurnay held of the Earl of Gloucester in chief the 
manor of Sermekote for half a knight's fee. 

And they say concerning the extent of Sermekote that the site of 
the court with the garden, curtilage, and herbage, is worth by the 
year 6^-. 8^. And the dovecote zs. 

There are there in the demesne of arable land 120 acres, each 
acre whereof is worth by the year $d. Sum, 50^. There are there 
in the demesne 16 acres of meadow, each acre whereof is worth by 
the year ^d. Sum, i is. The several pasture is worth by the year 
4-r. There are there in villeinage 7 virgates of land, each virgate 
whereof pays by the year 5^. Sum, 35^. Each virgate of land 
gives to the larder lod. Sum, \\s. Sd. The works of the same 
are worth in money ly^d. There are there 2 cottars, who pay by 
the year 1 id. There are there of the rent of assize of the free 
tenants 6s. zd. The pleas and perquisites are worth by the year 4^. 
Sum of the extent of this manor, £6 13J. iiid. 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. 11. J 

5 



50 Wiltshire 

The advowson of the church belongs to the heir of Roger de 
Gumay, and the church is worth z6s. Sd. 

Ancellus de Gumay is the son and next heir of Robert de Gurnay, 
and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 53 Henry III^ No. 23. 



dUiUiam le Caterner* 

Writ dated at Windsor 28th May, 53 Henry III [1269], directed 
to John le Moyne, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, commanding 
him to ascertain whether the houses in Marlebergh which were 
of William le Taverner, who was lately drowned as it is said, are 
the escheat of the King by the death of the said William, etc. 

I nCJUlSltlOn made on Saturday next after the feast of 
J. St. Barnabas the Apostle, 53 Henry HI [1269], before Sir 
EUas Cotell, escheator, by the oath of Richard de Hospring, Peter 
Parmentar, William Delboe, William Heved, Robert Sarr' , Thomas 
Pistoris, John Truttuc, Gilbert Tripp, William Harenest, Roger 
Barun, Thomas Wade, and Robert Bacheler, who say that 

Juliana, daughter of Walter de Bristoll, was in the wardship of 
Master Roger de la Grene, and the same Roger had conversation 
with William Tavernar, who is now deceased, that the said William 
should marry the said Juliana, which said William then became 
affianced to the said Juliana, and after they had plighted their 
troth the said Juliana delivered all her tenements to Thomas de la 
Grene by a charter, by the compulsion of her friends, but the said 
Thomas had no seisin thereof and received no advantage from the 
same at any time, and when the said William married the said 
Juliana the said Thomas de la Grene came and gave to the said 
William with the said Juliana all his right which he had in free 
marriage at the door of the church, of all the tenements which 
happened to the said Juliana in heritage by Walter de Bristoll her 
father ; wherefore they say that the King cannot have that escheat. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 53 Henry III, No. 27. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 51 



iHattfietD ne ^t%%\\V 

In(][UlSltlOn made on Saturday next after the feast of 
St. Lucy, ^i Henry III [1268], at WodhuU, before Elias 
Cotele, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by the oath of Walter Mandiut, 
Henry de Betnton, Everard de Lyilecote, William Paris, William Quentin, 
William Quentin [sic], Reginald de Lavinton, Robert le fay, Ralph de 
Stokes, Richard Grandin, Richard de Clive, and Peter le Humme, who 
say that 

Matthew de Bessill was seised in his demesne as of fee of the 
manor of Woedhull on the day that he died, and there are in 
the same manor 250 acres of arable land in the demesne, and 
each acre by itself is worth %d. by the year. Sum, ;^8 bs. %d. 
There are there 30 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by the 
year \6d. Sum, 40J. And there is pasture for 2 plough horses, and 
it is worth 1 6d. And there is there pasture for 1 6 oxen and 8 cows. 
Sum, 13J. 4^. Of the profit of the houses, gardens, dovecotes, 
herbage, and " s?uar," zbs. Sd. There is there a pasture for 100 sheep 
at one time, and it is worth 2s. Concerning the free tenants, they 
say that Richard Grandin holds 2 virgates of land for the which he 
pays by the year i lb. of pepper, and it is worth 6d. Ralph de Stokes 
holds I virgate and a half of land, and pays for the virgate id., and 
for the half-virgate ^ lb. of pepper, and it is worth ^d. Of the 
other free tenants, viz., of 3 cottars, 5^., of the Prior of Ambresbery 
for tithes, 5J. Robert Carpenter pays for a certain mansion and 
croft 5s. 

There are 9 tenants there, each of whom holds 5 acres of land, 
and the service of each of them is worth by the year 4J. Sum, 36^. 

William Spraggy holds one house, for the which he pays one last 
(lestian) and 2 collars (colers), and they are worth zd. 

The said Matthew held the said manor of Woedhull in chief of 
the King, paying to the Exchequer of the King at Easter in each 
year 4 barbed arrows. 

John Besill, son of the said Mattheiv, is his next heir, and will be 
of the age of 23 years at the feast of St. Peter in Cathedra next 
coming. 

The said 9 tenants pay by the year 42 hens, and they are worth 
4y. 6(f. by the year. 

Sum-total, £\^ 4J. %d. 

Alice, some time the wife of William de Englechenile, holds the 
third part of the said manor by reason of her dower. 



52 Wiltshire 

The King took the homage of John de Bezilles, son and heir 
of Matthew de Bezill, lately deceased, of all the lands and tenements 
which the said Matthew his father held of the King in chief on the 
day that he died, and gave to him those lands and tenements. 
And therefore it is commanded to John le Moyne, escheator on this 
side the Trent, that having accepted security from the said John 
for his reasonable relief to be paid to the Exchequer of the King, 
he cause full seisin to be made to the said John, without delay, 
of all the said lands and tenements whereof the said Matthew was 
seised in his demesne as of fee in his bailiwick, and which by 
reason of his death are taken into the hands of the King. 

Witness the King at Winchester, 2Sth December, 53 Henry III 
[1268]. 

The King, by the fine of ;^ 100 which Peter Malore made with the 
executors o( Alianora, formerly Queen of England, consort of the 
King, whereof he should pay one moiety to the Exchequer at 
Easter next coming and the other moiety at Michaelmas, granted 
to the said Peter the wardship of the lands and tenements which 
were o^ John de Bezilles, deceased, who held of the King in chief, 
to hold with the knight's fees, advowsons of churches, dowers when 
they shall happen, wards, reliefs, etc., until the lawful age of the 
heir of the said John, together with the marriage of the said heir. 

Witness the King at Westminster, 6thFebruary,2oEdwardI [1292]. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 53 Henry III, No. 45. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Sende on Thursday in the vigil of 
A St. Nicholas, 54 Henry HI [1269], before Sir E. Cotele, then 
escheator, by the oath of Robert de Aubervill, John de Caunbo, 
Nicholas Wdz, Peter Bentt, Hugh de Baudeham, Richard Purchaz, 
Roger de Lilleshull, Walter de la Rude, Roger le Gras, Hugh de 
Wojuemere, Robert de Lupegat, and Nicholas Gernet, who say that 

John de Chyrebury held of the King 15 librates of land in Sende 
on the day of his death by the fourth part of a knight's fee, and 
the said land is worth so much by the year on account of the 
increment which the %^\A John has put on the said land. 

Wyganiis, son of the said>/^«, is his next heir and is of full age. 
The said fohn held one coppice of the King in Sende for \id. in 
serjeanty. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 53 

The said John held £1 \is. \d. of land in Winterbum of the 
Earl of Hereford for one knight's fee. And he also had the 
advowson of the Church of the said vill on the day of his death, 
and the said Church is worth by the year 6oj. 

Chan, Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III^ No. 2. 



Salter De ©un^tamrL 

InC[UlSltlOn made at Castelcumbe on Saturday next after 
the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 54 Henry III [1270], 
before Sir Elias Cotele, escheator in co. Wilts, by Robert Cqynel, 
Henry Herberd, William de Eswelle, William Water, William Henri, 
Roger de Caynes, Adam le Jevene, Henry le Blunt, Robert Dru, William 
Selewine, Osbert de Capitewilla (?), John le Buriman, viz., when Sir 
Walter de Dunstanivilla died, and how much land he held, etc., who 
say that 

The said Walter died on Tuesday next after the feast of St. Hilary 
in the said year, and that he was seised in his demesne as of fee on 
the day that he died of the manor of Cumbe, which is worth 
per annum, clear, £io 3^. i\d., and of the manor of Culleine, 
which is worth ;^i5 12^. 7^., and the manor of Stei\e, which is 
worth ;^22 15J., and the manor of Hurdecote, which is worth 
;^i5 \\s. lod., and the manor of Hegtredeburi, which is worth 
£5^ lOJ. * 

Petronilla, daughter of the said Willi am de Dunstanivilla, is his 
next heir, and will be aged 22 years on the day of St. Peter in 
Cathedra in the said year. 

Robert de Montefort married the said Petronilla. He \jic\ owed 
to the King for the said land the service of 3 knights. He did not 
hold in CO. Wilts any land except of the King. All the free tenants 
and others who owed to pay rent to the said Walter were wont 
to pay the rent at 4 terms of the year, viz., Easter, the feast of the 
Nativity of St. John, the feast of St. Michael, and the feast of 
St. Thomas the Apostle. 

He had the advowson of the Church of Cumbe, and the Church 
is worth per annum 5 marks. He also had the advowson of the 
Church of Collerna, and it is worth per annum 20 marks. 
5 * Chan. Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III, No. 10. 



c^ Wiltshire 



Inquisition n..;.ae on Friday next before the feast of 
St. Margaret, 54 Henry III [1270], before Elias Cotele, then 
escheator in co. Wilts, of the lands and tenements v/h\ch Alb redade 
Boterell held in her demesne as of fee on the day that she died 
in the said county, by the oath of Richard de Pureshutt, Philip de 
LuUehulU Walter Huscard, John Savage, Stephen le Tot, John Fabri, 
Roger le Frund, Richard Turgis, Thomas Compernage, Nicholas Dodde, 
Walter Hude, Walter de Hayhe, who say that 

The said Albreda held of the King in chief on the day that she 
died in the vill of Estgremsted and Westdune 2 carucates of land 
by the service of one knight to be made to the King, and they are 
worth per annum, clear, £\.o. 

And the said Albreda held of the Bishop of Winchester, at 
Hampteworthe, 100 solidates of land, making to the said Bishop of 
scutage as much as belongs to one knight's fee. 

Oliver de Ingeham is her next heir, and is aged 40 years and more. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III, No. 12. 



Writ dated at Merleberge 3rd December, 54 Henry IH [1269]. 

Inquisition taken at Wilton \iQioxt Roger de Clifford, justice 
of the forest on this side the Trent, by Robert de Raynes, 
chief forester of Braden and other his foresters, and hy James de 
Grundewell, Thomas Maureward, Richard de la Leye, and John 
de Hanekynton, virderers, Thomas de Dodejord, William Spileman, 
Walter Manduyt, Peter de Mordun, William Bailemund, Anketill de 
Lydierd, Richard de Wydyhull, Richard Costard, Thomas Neel, Richard 
le Archer, Thomas de la Hyde, and Robert Esturmy, regarders of the 
said forest, and by other honest and lawful men of those parts, 
whether it would be to the damage of the King, or to the hurt 
of his said forest, if he should grant to John Tregoz that he may 
enclose his wood of Shortegrave, which is within the said forest, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 55 

with ditch and hedge, and make a park of it at his will, etc., 
who say that it would not be to the damage of the King nor to the 
hurt of his said forest if he should grant to the said John that 
he may enclose his said wood with ditch and hedge and make 
a park thereof at his will. And that that wood shall be distant 
from the great cover of the said forest by half a league, and that it 
shall contain in itself 20 acres by the perch of the King of the 
forest. And that that is not the place where the beasts of the lord 
repair and access. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III, No. 42. 



^rtor of ^t i^argaret De if^erleberge, 

I nqUlSl Lion taken at Merleberge on Saturday next after the 
J. feast of St. Michael, 54 Henry III [1270], by the foresters, 
virderers, regarders, 'and all the other ministers of the forest of 
Savernak, and by other honest and lawful men joined with them, 
viz., Philip Fraunceys, Walter de Berewyk, William Crespin, Geoffrey 
Barbast, Thomas de Mapelerton, Thomas de Kenete, Adam Syward, 
Walter le Pyk, Picotde Flexbury, John de Bosco, William le Toppere, and 
John de Evesbury, whether it would be to the damage of the King or 
to the hurt of his forest of Savernak, or to the damage or hurt of 
others, if he should grant to the Prior of St. Margaret de Merleberge 
that he may have in his said forest 16 oxen and 4 cows every day in 
the pasture of the said forest for ever or not, who say that it is not 
to the damage of the King, nor to the hurt of his said forest, nor to 
the hurt or damage of others, if he should grant to the said Prior 
that he may have 16 oxen and 4 cows every day in the pasture of 
the said forest for ever, without the lands (landas) of the said 
forest. The pasture for all the oxen and cows might be worth by 
the year 40^. It would be less to the damage of the King if he 
should grant to the said Prior the said liberty throughout the whole 
of the said forest rather than in some parts, because then the forest 
would be less charged in parts, nevertheless this to be without 
the said lands as is aforesaid. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 54 Henry III, N'o. 50. 



56 Wiltshire 

i^xm of £)6eburn» 

'Hr • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken before Henry de Monte Forti at Marle- 
X berge on Thursday next after the feast of St. James the 
Apostle, 54 Henry III [1270J, by the command of the King, by the 
oath of Thomas de la Grene, Thomas Wade, William Heved, Henry de 
Ospring, John le Greye, John Hervy, Henry de la Gtlhalle, Sampson 
Juvenis, Robert Hervest, Thomas Cramer, Richard {?) de Wynton, and 
Richard de Aulton, of the vill of Merleberge, Richard de la Barre, 
Elias Freteoxe, John de Wol/hal, and Nicholas Emelot, of the hundred 
of Kynewardeston, Walter de Berewyk, Geoffrey Barebast, Robert de 
Kingeburn, Adam Siward, Ernaldus Francis, Walter le Pyk, Thomas 
Jop, and Pycot de Flexeberge, of the hundred of Selkel, Thomas de 
Cardenill, Nicholas Stigant, Roger le Grant, John le Fugheler, Robert 
de Wbckes, Peter Elys, John Lovelot, Richard le Grant, Philip Burgeys, 
William Gerard, Nicholas Payn, of the hundred of Thornhull, that 
whereas the Prior of Okeburn and his predecessors from time 
immemorial have had and held a certain mill outside Merleberge, 
in the parish of Mildehall, whether up to this time they have been 
wont to have a cart itinerating in the said vill, seeking the corn of 
those of the said vill who wished to grind the same at the said mill, 
as it is said, and if the constable of the castle of Marleborough 
prevents the said Prior from having such a cart as he ought to have, 
and hitherto has been wont to have, and took the distresses of the 
said Prior for this reason, and still detains them to the great damage 
of the said Prior, etc., etc. 

And Roger de Chesne, constable of the castle of Marleborough, 
came and acknowledged that he distrained the said Prior, and justly 
because, whereas the King committed to him the castle of Marle- 
borough to keep, he commanded him by his writ to cause the lands 
and tenements belonging to the said castle to be extended, so by 
the inquisition thereof made he found that the said Prior never had 
the said cart so itinerating except by the licence of the constables 
of the said castle and for their giving. 

And the jurors say that the said Prior and his ancestors were 
wont to have seisin of the said cart for 60 years and more, and that 
the constables for the time being, took that cart of the said Prior 
and his ancestors, but how it was delivered they know not, but it 
was delivered without the command of the King each turn, where- 
upon they say that they know well that the said Prior and his 
predecessors were accustomed to have that cart so itinerating, 
and for the long seisin which they have had thereof up to this 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 57 

time they know that the said Prior and his successors ought to have 
the same. 

And they say that the King has damage to the value of i mark 
by the year. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III., No. 51. 



i^attl^etrj tie Columbanft(|5» 

InC[UlSltlOn made at Hardene on Monday next after the 
feast of St Mark the Evangelist, 54 Henry III [1270], by 
Henry Eslurmy, forester, and Walter de Lillebon, Herbert de Stokke^ 
Richard de Suthcote, and William Malewayn, verderers, by John le 
Pestur, Bartholomew le Marchaunt, Thomas Gerveys, William Michel, 
John Veisin, Elias Fretoxe, William de Werewelle, Geoffrey Leverer, 
Peter Bacun, William del Marays, John de Heywell, Adam Attemere, 
and Henry de Stoppeham, whether it be to the damage of the King 
or to the hurt of his forest of Savernake if he should grant to 
Matthew de Columbarius that he should not expeditate his dogs and 
those of his men of his manor of Chessebury, and that they should 
be quit of the expeditation of their dogs or not, etc., etc., who say 
that the said Matthew is, and ought to be quit, and that he and his 
ancestors have always up to the present time been quit oi the 
expeditation of their own dogs in his said manor, but their men 
there had and were wont to have their dogs expeditate! by the 
assize of the forest, and if any dog was found not expeditated when 
view or inquisition was made of the dogs not expeditated in the 
forest, viz., every third year, he gave for it 3J. in the name of mercy, 
according to the tenour of the charter of the liberties of the forest, 
but very rarely was any dog found there not expeditated, whereby 
the jurors do not know how to estimate the value of the said 
expeditation by the year, and that it would not be to the damage of 
the King except by the loss of the said mercy, which most rarely 
happens, if the King granted to the said Matthew that his men 
may be quit for ever of the expeditation of their dogs in his said 
manor. 

The said manor is within the meets of the regard, but so far 
distant from the cover of the said forest where the beasts of the 
King repair that no damage will ever happen to him concerning 
the said beasts by reason of the said dogs there not being 
expeditated. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III, No. 52. 



58 Wiltshire 

iHattl^etr De Colunibarite. 

InOUlSltlOn made at Windhok on Tuesday next before 
the feast of St. Mark the Evangelist, 54 Henry III [1270], 
by Walter de Loveraz and William de Puttone, foresters, by William 
de Galrugge and Henry de Mere, verderers, by Richard le Queinie, 
Thomas de Brikevile, John de Kingbrigg, John de Empnele, Richard de 
Molendin\ John de Fonte, Robert Neel, Peter de Dunebur , John Payn, 
James de Empnele, Richard Stonham, and Richard Elys, whether it 
would be to the damage of the King and to the hurt of his forest 
of la Bokholte if he should grant to Matthew de Columbarius that 
his dogs and those of his men of his manor of Tuderlegh with 
its members of Hobebury and Lokerlegh should not be expeditated, 
and that they should be quit of the expeditation of their dogs or 
not, Ox rtot, who say that the said Matthew is and ought to be and 
that he and his ancestors always up to the present time have been 
quit of the expeditation of their own dogs of the said manor and 
the said members, but their men there had and were wont to have 
their dogs expeditated by the assize of the forest [etc.]. ' 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 54 Henry III, No. 52. 



In(j[UlSltlOn made at Chippeham on Monday next after 
Low Sunday, 55 Henry HI {^iz-ji^h^'ioxQ. Henry de Shotesbrok, 
under-sheriff of Stephen de Eddewiche, by the oath of Richard son of 
Avice, Robert Wayjer, Simon Clement, Roger de la Hyde, Thomas le 
Francklayn, Roger de Scaler, Simon le Sweyn, Walter le Frank, 
Nicholas de Pynkeny, Philip de Pinkeny, Nicholas de Sevehampton, 
and Thomas Roylly, who say that 

William Giffard held on the 15th day of October, 54 Henry HI 
[1270], of the land which was of Ralph de Pinkeny in Sharston 
Parva, in demesne 96 acres of land which are worth 24J., price of 
the acre 3</., also 6 acres of meadow, worth 12^., price of the acre 
2S. Also the easement of the court with the issues of the garden is 
worth by the year 3J. ; also the moiety of one water-mill, worth by 
the year 5J. Of the rent of assize of the freemen by the year 
i8j. z\d., of the same for the custom in the Autumn which they 

' As in the first part of this Inquisition relating to the manor of Chessebury. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 59 

ought to make to him \\d. Also i lb. of rent of assize, viz. 
pepper, worth ]^y the year %d. Also 2 lbs. of cummin by the 
year, and they are worth \\d., price of the lb. \d. 
Sum-total of the value, b\s. zd. 

Chan. Inq. p.jn., 55 Henry ///, No. 7. 



Inquisition made at Ebbeleburn Wake on Monday next 
after the feast of All Saints, 55 Henry III [1270], before 
Elias Cotele, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by the oath of Gerard de 
Coker, John Beneger, Robert Riissel, Roger de De me ford, John de 
Gerardeslon, John Bigge, Thomas de Gerardeston, Martin de Moltns, 
William Wlvrich, Richard Hurlebat, Thomas de Ti jwe, Thomas 
Wyther, and William Godeman, who say that 

Richard de Wyghehregh held of the King in chief on the day that 
he died 2 carucates of land in Ebbelesburn Wake, by the service of 
half a knight's fee in Dycton (.?) in Wales, and it is worth per 
annum, clear, ;^io. 

The said Richard held in ^ethehavene one carucate of land by 
the service of ^i o, to be paic^ by the year to the heirs of Sir William 
Lungespeye, and it is worth })er annum, clear, £io. 

William dt Wyghebergh is ihe son and heir of the said Richard axi^ 
is aged 24 years and more 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 55 Henry III, No. 12. 



JSic^arD De SBtcljebergl^. 

Inquisition made at Sutperton on the morrow of All 
Saints, 55 Henry III [1270], of the lands and tenements of 
Richard de Wyggeber, lately deceased, by John de Walelesham, Robert 
de Sancto Claro, Henry Lud, Hugh de Brwgcs, John de Stratton, 
Andrew Mercator^, John de Garditi, Henry le Warener, Hugh de 
Bathon, Robert Serle, Nicholas Lud, and Henry le Taverner, who 
say that 

Richard de Wiggeber' held in chief of the King on the day that he 
died one carucate of land iri Wiggeber' and one carucate of land in 



6o Wiltshire 

Peggenes, and they are worth by the year £\t, and he held the 
said lands by the service that the said Richard and his heirs ought 
to be doorkeepers of the King in his hall, of the fee whereof Ellin, 
mother of the said Richard, was in seisin of the said service, paying 
out of the said lands to the King by the hands of his sheriflF40J. at 
the feast of St. Michael. The said Richard held in chief of Sir 
Ralph de Alhinaco 2 virgates of land in Stratton, which are worth by 
the year 5^. zd. 

The said Richard died on Wednesday next before the feast of 
St. Michael, 54 Henry III [1270] ; William de Wiggebtr* is his son 
and heir, and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 55 Henry III, No. 12. 



JSobert De la i^iare* 

InOUlSltlOn made at Stupellavinton on Friday next before 
the feast of St. Laurence, 56 Henry IH [1272], before 
.5ir Eustace de Hulle, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by the oath of 
John de Kambe, Richard Enock, Gilbert de Aula, William Morin, Peter 
de Grangin, Nicholas de Cruce, William Gule, Richard le Blund, John 
de Wodebrigh, William Sorel, Luke Stulle, and Robert le Franckelain, 
who say that 

Robert de la Mare held of the King the day that he died the 
seventh part of the manor of Stupullaunton by the service of 20J., 
to be paid at the castle of Devises by the year : how much he held . 
of others they do not know. 

There are there 200 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth 
by itself by the year 6d. ; sum, loos. Also 4 acres of meadow, and 
each acre is worth is. ; sum, 8f. There is there one garden, and it 
is worth by the year 20s. There is there pasture for 40 oxen, and 
the pasture of each is worth ^d. ; sum, los. There is there pasture 
for 400 ewes, and the pasture of each is worth \d. ; sum, 8j. \d. \jic'\. 
There are there 3 water-mills, whereof one is worth per annum 30^., 
another 15^., and the third 13J. 4</. ; sum, 58^. 4^. The rent of 
assize there by the year is altogether £^ os. 2\d. The pleas and 
perquisites by the year 20s. There is there one grove, which is 
worth per annum, clear, 6^. %d. Sum-total, ;^i5 i is. ^\d. 

Peter de la Mare, son of the said Robert, is his next heir, and is 
aged 24 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 56 Henry III, No. 7. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 6i 

gjol^n 'Beneger. 

Writ dated at Haveringes 28th August, 56 Henry III [1272]. 

Inquisition made at Albedeston before Eustace de Hull 
Deverel, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by command of the King, 
to extend the lands and tenements which were of John Benegerr, 
lately deceased, which said John held of the Abbess of Wilton, 
on Thursday next before the nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
56 Henry HI [1272], by Gilbert de Esse, John de Girardeston, Adam 
Wake, John Golled, Thomas de Girardeston, Roger de Deryieford, 
William Worverich, William son of John, Peter son of Richard, John 
Waffre, Roger Cocum, and Richard Hurlebadte, who say that 

John Beneger held of the Abbess and Convent of Wilton in fee 
farm 2 parts of 12 bovates of land on the day that he died, 
paying yearly to the Abbess and Convent 48 quarters of wheat and 
48 quarters of malt, of the which 16 quarters shall be of barley and 
8 quarters of wheat, and of the other 24 quarters 16 to be of oats 
and 8 of barley. He paid the moiety of the said corn at the feast 
of St. Martin and the other moiety at the feast of St. Barnabas. 
He paid yearly 24 quarters of oats for the making of coarse meal 
(gruell). He paid yearly 6 quarters of corn, whereof 3 quarters of 
wheat and the other 3 of barley, to make bread for the household, 
and he paid it at the said terms. He paid yearly 400 loaves, for the 
making of which loaves there shall be at least 7 quarters of wheat 
and barley in equal portions. He paid yearly 9J marks of rent of 
assize and 200 skins, and all the aforesaid are assigned for the food 
and clothing of the nuns of Wilton. 

The heir of the said John is aged 7 years and is called Ingeramus. 
There is there no ward or marriage, because he holds the said land 
in fee farm, and it is worth per annum as in gardens, one windmill, 
one dovecote, and in meadows and pastures 4 marks ^s. lod., besides 
the services aforesaid which belong to the Abbess and Convent 
of Wilton, 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 36 Henry III, No. 16. 



62 Wiltshire 



giol^n 'Beneger. 

Inquisition made at Al^edeston on Monday next before 
the feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, 56 Henry III [1272], 
before Eustace de Hulk Deverel, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, to extend 
the lands and tenements which were oi John Beneger, deceased, 
who held of the Abbess of Wilton, by Gilbert de Esse and others 
(as above), who say that 

John Beneger held of the Abbess and Convent of Wilton in fee 
farm 2 carucates of land in Al^edeston, paying therefor yearly to 
the Abbess and Convent 48 quarters of wheat and 48 quarters of 
malt (as above). 

\_This Inquisition is word for word like the above, with the exception 
of the following clause : — 

The ward and marriage belong to the Abbess and Convent of 
Wilton, whereof Alice de Parhum (.?), formerly Abbess, was in seisin 
of the wardship and marriage of the said John, and sold them 
to Cristina his mother, who now survives, for 40 marks sterling. 

And the jury was deceived by the haste of their clerk.] 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 56 Henry III, No. 16. 



Extent made at Cumpton Basset in the hundred of Calne 
on Wednesday next after the feast of St. Edmund the 
Confessor, 56 Henry IH [1271], by the oath of Philip de Berewyk, 
Richard Teband, Robert son of William, Adam de Berewyk, John de la 
Hume, Walter Andreu, Nicholas de Tayllur, Stephen de Hyweye, 
Nicholas Luvetrot, William Cosyn, Adam Colebat, and Thomas de Bosco, 
who say that 

There are there of arable land 204 acres, and each acre is worth 
per itself 4^. Sum, 68^. 

There are there 30 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
itself 1 2</. Sum, 305'. 

There is there pasture for 30 oxen, and the pasture of each is 
worth by itself 4^/. Sum, 1 os. 

There are there of works in Autumn 25^. ^d. Sum, 25J. 3</. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 6t^ 

Of pleas and perquisites there by the year zos. Sum, zos. 
There are there 2 dovecotes, and they are worth by the year 
6j. %d. Sum, 6 J. M. 

The easement of the court and the profit of the garden by the 
year loj. Sum, \os. 

There is there a certain vivary, and it is worth by the year 5^. 
Sum, IS. 

Rent of assize there by the year £<) is. ^\d. Sum, £<) is. ^\d. 

Sum-total of the value, £ib lys. i^d. 

The said manor is held of the King of Germany by one knight's 
fee, and the said Philip was seised in his demesne as of fee of the 
said manor on the day that he died. 

Alina, the wife of Sir Roger Bygot, Marshall of England, is the 
daughter and next heir of the said Philip Bassett, and is now aged 
22 yaars and more. 

Extent of the lands which were of the said Sir Philip Basset 
made the said day and year. 

There are there of arable land 250 acres, price of the acre ^d. 
Sum, 104.?. id. 

There are there 6 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
itself by the year 13^. Sum, 6^. 6</. 

There is there pasture for 24 oxen, and the pasture of each is 
worth by itself by the year 5^. Sum, \os. 

There is there pasture for 6 ewes, and the pasture of each is 
worth by itself \d. Sum, 4J. zd. 

Also of rent of assize by the year \oos. Sum, \oos. 

The works in Autumn are worth ds. 8d. Sum, 6s. Sd. 

The pleas and perquisites there are worth by the year i \s. 
Sum, I IS. 

The easements of the court there by the year 4^. 

Sum-total of the value, ;^i2 6s. 6d. 

The said manor of Berewyk is held of the King for one spar- 
hawk to be paid to the Exchequer of the King by the year: 
the said Philip was thereof seised in his demesne as of fee on 
the day that he died. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 56 Henry III, No. 31. 



64 Wiltshire 

The free manor of Wotton Basset. 

Extent there of the lands of Sir Philip Basset before Sir 
Eustace de Hulk, escheator in co. Wilts, on Thursday next 
after the feast of St. Edmund the Confessor, 56 Henry III [127 1], 
by the oath of John le Chepman, John le Frankelayn, William le 
Frankelayn, Thomas le Wyse, Adam de Calne, William Curteys, Walter 
David, William de Wotton, Robert Edmund, William le Prest, Thomas 
de Clyve, and Walter le Careter, who say that 

There are there of arable land 560 acres, and each acre is worth 
by the year 4^/. Sum, £q 6s. %d. 

There are there 65 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
itself izd. Sum, 8oj. 5^. [70s. dd.']. 

There is there pasture for 3 oxen and 20 cows, and the pasture 
of each is ^-oxih per se 6d. Sum, 26s. 

There is there pasture for 100 sheep, and the pasture of each is 
worth by itself i</. Sum, 4^'. zd. 

There are there 3 parks, the pasture whereof is worth by the 
year 30J. Sum, 30J. 

There is there a foreign wood which contains in itself 60 acres, 
of which the pasture is common, and it is worth by the year, with 
the issue, 6.r. %d. Sum, 6s. Bd. 

The pannage of the same is worth by the year $s. 

There is there of rent of assize of the said manor with its 
members by the year, ;^2o 4^. ^d. Sum, ;^2o 4^. 4^. 

The pleas and perquisites are worth by the year 50.^. 

The toll of the market there is worth by the year 50J. 

The easement of the court and the profit of the garden are worth 
by the year 1 3 j. ^d. 

There is there one water-mill and 2 windmills, and they are worth 
by the year 40X. 

Sum of the whole value, ^44 6s. -jd. 

The said manor with its members is held of the King of Germany 
by reason of his honour of Wallingeford by knight's service, and the 
said Philip was thereof seised in his demesne as of fee on the day 
that he died. Alina, wife of Sir R. Bygot, Earl of Norfolk and 
Marshall of England, is the daughter and next heir of the said 
Philip Basset, and is aged 22 years and more. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 65 



XJi/Xt6nt made there the said day and year. 

There are there 1 54 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth 
by itself ^d. Sum, 64J. zd. 

There are there 12 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth 
by itself 12c/. Sum, \zs. 

There is there pasture for 12 oxen, and the pasture of each is 
worth by itself dd. Sum, bs. 

There is there pasture for 150 sheep, and the pasture of each 
is worth ^d. Sum, 6^. -^d. 

There is there of rent of assize by the year 54^'. lo^/. 

There is there one water-mill, and it is worth by the year 13^, \d. 

There is there the easement of the court and the profit of the 
garden, and they are worth by the year 6j. %d. 

The profits and perquisites of the court there are worth by the 
year 6j. %d. 

Sam-total of the value, ;^8 igj. \\d. 

The said manor is held of the King of Germany by reason of the 
honour of Wallingeford, and the said Phil'p was thereof seised in 
his demesne as of fee the day that he died. 



Cl^e mooU0 of tl^e abbe00 of Wom^et. 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Sarum on Friday next after the 
X Epiphany of the Lord, 56 Henry III [1272], before i'l/a/Mrtt/fl?*? 
Colunibariiis and Nicholas de Romeseye, by command of the King 
especially assigned hereto, by Eustace de la Hulk, John Dangers, 
Laurence de Bosco, verderers of Selewod, John de Langejord, verderer 
of Gravelynges, Peter de Baldenham, verderer of Melkesham, Walter 
Wymund, Walter de Brocweye, William de Wyteclyve, regarders of the 
forest of Selewood, Simon de Vmmere, Hugh de la Slow, Davyd 
Durand, Simon de Orkedale, William Colsweyn, John de Holeweye, 
Richard de Stokes, Walter Done, William Grunny, Robert de Hunebrygg, 
John le Frye, William Hendeman, John Petit, William Sturdy, Roger le 
Frankeleyn, Roger le Cr . Hugh de Wulvemere, John Cambo, Robert 
Doget of Westwod, and Leodegarius, forester of Selewud, whether the 
woods of the Abbess of Romesey of Aston and Edyndon in co. 
Wilts have from time immemorial been outside the regard and 
meets of tie forest, who say that 

WILTS IN<, —VOL. II. e 



66 Wiltshire 

The said woods were outside the regard and meets of the forest 
up to the time of Sir Al/an de Nevi/, then justice of the lord the King 
of the forest, who afforested the said woods at his will. Afterwards 
came the knights and others of the said county and gave to the 
King /^i 00 of silver to have the perambulation, by which peram- 
bulation the said woods of the said Abbess were deforested up to 
the time oi Robert Passeleiveye, then justice of the King of the forest, 
who afforested those woods at his will. 

Chan. Ifiq. p.m., 56 Henry III, No. 53. 



Inn UlSl Lion made at Chippeham of the lands and tenements 
which were of Sir Herbert Peche in co. Wilts on Wednesday 
next after the feast of St. Martin, 57 Henry VI [1272], before Sir 
Eustace de Hulk and other trustworthy men, by Richard de Kumer- 
ivelle, Roger Burd, Roger Kyggesman, Robert Gale, Henry Herebert, 
Walter de Porta, Simon de Ecclesia, Walter Gahvays, Richard Godlyve, 
Robert Torri, William Baldewyne, and Nicholas Kosin, who say that 

Herebert Peche held one hide of land in Hertham of the fee of Sir 
Henry de Lacy, and held nothing of the King in chief. 

He had no other tenement in co. Wilts by which the King ought 
to obtain any seisin. 

Bartholomew is the son and next heir of the said Sir Herbert, and 
is aged 16 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 57 Henry III, No. 4. 



E 



JSobert ©o^nelt 

XtCnt made of the land which Robert DoynellheXd. in chief 
of the King at Iwys in co. Wilts, by the oath of Hamond de 
Bachampton, Robert Burdun, Philip de Prebenda, Philip Oliver, 
Edmund de Stanton, John son of Philip, Peter Marescall, William 
Maleweyn, Reginald de Btracyk, John son of Ranulphus, Roger le 
Hare, and John le Novel, who say that 

The land which Robert Doytiell held in chief of the King is worth 
by the year in demesne 40J., in rent of assize 33J., in meadow half 
a mark. He had no pasture of his own, and so it is worth by the 
year 79^. %d. altogether. 

Chan. Inq. p.?n., Henry III, uncertain date, No. 29. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 67 



Geoffrey Huse, John del Angeford, Walter de Camerd, Peter le Frank 
of Brut ford, William de Gares, Ralph de Flores, David le Archer, 
Walter Luvel, Alexander Viring, Robert le Furhur, Henry Potherdy, 
and Adam le Vineter, jurors, say that 

Richard de Muleford held in chief of the King in the vill of 
Muleford one virgate of land by the service of keeping the forest 
of Clarendon, and it is worth per annum, clear, 20.?. 

The said Richard held of Sir Stephen de Muleford^ in the vill of 
Laverkestok, one mill and 16 acres of land, paying for the same 
one mark by the year, and it is worth per annum, clear, 20J. 

Edmund, son o^ John, son and heir of the said Richard de Muleford^ 
is his next heir, and is aged 1 1 years. 

Chati. Inq. p.m., Henry III, uncertain time, No. 79. 



Inquisition made by command of the King, before Sir 
R. Walerad, steward of the King of the forest on this side 
the Trent, by the oath of William de Cardevil, Adam de Poltun, 
Nicholas le Haunt', Richard Quintin, Ralph Abbi, Richard de Sutcote, 
Berenger de Wlphal, Thomas Warin, William Warin, Adam de la 
Clenche, Geoffrey le Drues, Richard Sniewin, who say that 

John de Wyke held of the King in chief one virgate of land which 
is worth by the year one mark; and he holds of Sir Walter de Ripar' 
3 virgates of land, paying to him by the year 9^., and doing the 
service of one esquire in the army for 4 days, and they are worth, 
clear, zos.\ and he held of the fee of the Abbot of Bello [_sic'\ one 
cotland of land by the service of zs., and it is worth, clear, \id.; 
he also held of the Abbot of Hyda one mill and 2 acres of land in 
fee farm, paying therefor by the year 185., and they are worth 
by the year half a mark ; he also held one bailiwick in the forest of 
Savernac of the King in chief, viz., the moiety of that bailiwick 
which begins in the valley of Braedone and extends in length up to 
Warckewee, and in breadth from Falestone to Nikerpole, and he 
pays to the King for the said virgate of land and his bailiwick zbs. 
at the castle of Marleberg, and the appurtenances of the bailiwick 
are contained in a certain schedule. The said land with the 



68 Wiltshire 

bailiwick and other appurtenances are worth per annum, clear, loof., 
and he pays to the King for the same as is aforesaid 26^. And he 
keeps the bailiwick with himself and two men at his cost. 

John, son of John de Wyke, is his next heir, and is aged 30 years. 

Benfy Slurmt seised the lands and bailiwick into the hand of the 
King and holds them. 

Chan. Inq.p.m.y Henry III, uncertain time. No. 119. 



muitam De Cantilupe. 

Extent made of the manor of Calna, which was formerly of 
William de Cantilupe, by the 12 jurors underwritten, free 
burgesses and other free tenants, viz., William Scriptor, Roger 
Drapar, Walter Phelipe, Walter Pistor, John Cusin, Richard Pope, 
John de Bradeford, Peter Mercennar\ Thomas Pilewug, William Pistor, 
Reginald Anketil, and Nicholas Godeivin, who say that 

The said William de Cantilupe held Calne of the King in fee 
farm in right of inheritance, and that he had in the same vill 
25 messuages which paid to him yearly 33^. -jd., and the toll of 
the market and chepingavel and brewingavel, and with a certain 
rent of the term of St. Martin with the aid of the sheriff. And the 
mill is worth by the year £6 ^s. $d. ; 5 acres of arable land, 4J. ; 
4 acres of meadow, 13^. ^d. ; and view of frankpledge of the 
hundred yearly, 40J. ; and the amerciaments as well of the hundred 
as of the markets, 40J. ; and the rent of 4 . . . who are 
called . . . bos. ; and i lb. of pepper of the rent of 
Renmuln. And be it known that the said William and his 
ancestors paid yearly to the King to his Exchequer ;^i 5 for the 
same vill. 

Sum of the whole extent of Calne, ;^2 3 0^. 4^/. and i lb. of pepper. 

Extent made there of the manor of Caleston, which was of the 
said William, by the said jurors, and by John .... Henry, 
son of Bartholomew, Henry Pynn'oc, William Ascer, and Everard 
Pynnel, free tenants of ... . and by 12 customars, who 
say that 

There are there 2 carucates of land containing 280 acres, £-], 
price of the acre bd. And there are there 1 2 acres of meadow, 
and they are worth . . . . %d. The pasture for the oxen is 
worth 4^., and the pasture for 300 sheep its. bd. And of the yearly 
rent as well of the free tenants as the customars, £iz os. bd. The 
mill is worth by the year .... and the tallage of the 



Inquisitiones Post Morie?n. 69 

customars 20^. The view of frankpledge is worth by the year 
ts. Sd. Also the ... . and perquisites of the court, 6^-. Sd. 
The easements of the court with the garden, js. Also the pannage 
of the pigs is worth by the year i2</. Also the chersetum of 
Galmare, $s. The works and customs in Autumn, ^s. ^d. 

Sum of the whole extent of the manor of Caleston, ;^24 4^. 4^/. 

The said manor owes the service of half a knight to the King 
when it severally shall fall due. 

C/ian. Inq. p.m., Henry III, uncertain time. No. 176. 



(0eoffre^ ^^U* 

I O Henry, by the grace of God, King of England, Lord of 
-*- Ireland, Duke of Normandy, and Earl of Anjou, the 
Sheriff of Wiltshire sends greeting and faithful service. We have 
received your Letters under this form : — Henry, by the grace of 
God, etc., to the Sheriff of Wiltshire, greeting : We command you 
that without delay you cause diligent enquiry to be made by the 
free and lawful men of the neighbourhood of Ficleden and Stapelf ', 
if Geoffrey Hose held in chief of the lord King John, Our father, one 
knight's fee in the said vills of Ficleden and Siapelf , and if 
Henry Hose, of Batli, is his heir; and therefore 1 let you know that 
the inquisition is made by these '^nighis, James de Pottrna, Jordan 
de Sanclo Martino, Hugh de Droeis, John Maiit ravers, Henry Foliot, 
James de Trowc, Henry de Aubenny, William Gireb\ Michael de Sturt, 
Roger de Danteseia, Thomas de Kenet, Robert Matidut, Walter de 
Vernun, who say that 

Geoffrey Hose, son of Geoff'rey Hose, held Ficledene and Stapelf 
in chief of the King by the service of one knight, and that the said 
Geoffrey had one sister who was a nun in the Abbey of Wilton, and 
therefore they say that they know no nearer heir of the said 
Geoffrey than Henry Htise, of Thatewit. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., Henry III, uncertain time. No. 191. 



Cl^e iHen of tl^e 'Barton of iHarleburg]^* 

N. de Lusteshull, Sheriff of Wilts, to the Constable of Merleberg', 
greeting. We have received the mandate of the King in these 
words : — Henry, by the grace of God, etc., to the Sheriff of Wilt- 
shire, greeting : We command you by the oath as well of knights 
S * 



70 Wiltshire 

as of others to enquire diligently whether Our men of Our Barton 
of Merleberg' were wont and ought to have common of pasture for 
their beasts in the meadow of Maniton, which Nicholas de Barbeflet 
holds of Hugh de Dotire immediately after the said meadow has 
been mown, and in Cadicroft, etc., etc. 

Names of the jurors upon the inquisition made by command of 
the King between Nicholas de Barhefleot and the King's men of the 
Barton as to the common of the meadow of Manniton and 
Kadecroft : Sir Richard de Hoifon, Sir Robert de Stutescumb, Sir 
William de Kardevill, Sir William de Kaliia, knights, Richard 
Sukmund, Thomas de Afacj', Wi/liam de Ulacy, Adam de Pol/on, 
William Walraiid, Elyas dc liosco, John de Hcnton, William de 
Win/erburn, Robert Pippard, John Barbaster, William Crispinns, and 
Henry le Dun, who say that 

The men of the lord the King of the Barton of IMerleberg' were 
not accustomed to have, nor ought tliey to have, common of pasture 
for their beasts in the meadow of Manniton, which Nicholas de 
Barbefleot holds of Hugh de Dourc immediately after the said 
meadow has been mown. The said Nicholas ought to put that 
meadow in defence if he will, so that the said men after the said 
mowing ought to have no common in the same. 

The said men of the Barton were not accustomed to have, neither 
ought they to have, common of pasture for their beasts in Cadecroft. 
Chan. Inq. p.m.. Hen. II J uncertain time. No. 233. 



I^eter ne la iHare* 

TnG lordship of Stupellavinton which was of Sir Peter de la 
Mara, extended by Thomas de la Wodebrugg\ Gilbert de Aula, 
Henry Calun\ William Marin, Robert, brother of the Chaplain, 
William, son of the Clerk, Peter de Granged, Luke Culte, Simon le 
Franckel, Adam Carpun, William Gule, and Nicholas de la Hele, 
jurors, who say that 

The said Peter de la Mara held the said lordship of the King in 
chief, making to him the service of one shield. 

There are there 192 acres of arable land, whereof each is worth 
by the year 6(/. Sum, £\ i \s. The meadow is worth by the year 
205-. The pasture is worth by the year \%s. (>d. The profit of 
a certain grove is 4J. The profit of the garden is worth by the 
year 4J. There are there of rent of assize i-]s. "jd. The chersetum 
is worth by the year bd. The profit of the pleas and perquisites and 



InquisUiones Post Morte^n. 71 

other customs is worth by the year is. The court with the ease- 
ment of the houses is worth by the year is. Sum-total, £% gj. "jd. 
The said land is now in the hand of the King. He did not hold 
of any other in co. Wilts. 

Sir Robert de la Mara, son of the said Peter, is his next heir and 
is aged 40 years. 

The said Peter gave in the said \n\\ of Stupellavinton 1 1 librates 
and 17 solidates of rent to Sir Poger de Dantes' in free marriage 
with his daughter, and they are in like manner in the hand of the 
King. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., Henry III, uncertain time, No. 256. 



Robert (LOaleraunti. 

Extent of the land of Sir Robert Walleraund in Stupellaunton 
made by Ralph de Flares, William de Parham, Philip Lucas, 
Simon Bubbe, Simon le Froke, Thomas Page, Walter le Rus, Simon Tut 
le Mund, William le Clerk, William de Stokes, Ralph . . . sloke, 
Robert Alberd, and William de Sanse, who say that 

There are there of arable land 293 acres, and that each acre 
is worth by itself 4</. Sum, £\ lys. Sd. 

There are there of arable land 9 acres, and each acre is worth 
I id. Sum, gs. 

There is there pasture for 24 oxen, and the pasture of each ox is 
worth 5^. Sum, tos. 

And there is there pasture for 550 sheep, and the pasture of 
a sheep is worth ^d. Sum, 21s. i id. 

Of rent of assize by the year, io$s. $d. 

The rent of 4 lbs. of wax to be paid at Pentecost. 

Of chersetum 56 hens, and each one by itself is worth id. 
Sum, 4J. Sd. 

The extent of the court and garden, half a mark. Sum, 6s. %d. 

Sum-total, ;^i2 14J. 4</., and of wax, lod. 

Robert Walleraund ha.d the said land of the gift of Lady Matilda 
de Albo Monasterio, formerly the wife of Six John, son o^ Allan, and 
the said Matilda had the said land in free marriage of Lady 
dementia de Verdun, her mother, and held the same of the Church 
of Sarum to find the wax light (candle) for the said Church. 
Matilda, wife of the said Robert Walleraund, is joined in the charter 
of feoffment for her life. 



7 2 Wiltshire 

Robert, son of William WaUeraund, is his next heir, and is aged 
1 6 years. 

The extent of Hurste made on Saturday in the Morrow of 
St. Matthew the Apostle by the said jurors, who say that 

There are there of arable land 6 acres, and each acre by itself is 
worth 4//. Sum, is. 

There are there 10 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth 4J. 
Sum, 40J. 

There is a pasture there which is worth by the year 8^. 

Of rent of assize by the year, 345-. 4</. 

There are there 2 water-mills which are worth looj. 

Also one dovecote, which is worth by the year half a mark. Sum, 
bs. SJ. 

The extent of the court and garden is worth by the year i mark. 
Sum, 13J. 4(/. 

Of chersetum by the year 36 hens, and each hen is worth id. 
Sum, 3^-. 

Sum-total, /^lo ys. Sd. 

The said Jiober/ held the said land of the gift of Roger de Mijnbur\ 

Matilda, wife of the said Robert, is joined in the said charter. 

The said land is held in chief of the Bishop of Sariim by the 
service of id. of rent. 

Of the certain heir of Hurst they are ignorant. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 6. 



Robert maleraunl»» 

InCJUlSltlOn made at New Sarum on Sunday next before 
the Ascension of Our Lord, i Edward I [1273], before 
l^Matlheu)] de Columbariis, as to the manner and form of the 
enfeoffment which R . . . \_Walerauttd made to Alan de'} 
Plukenet, ' his grandson [nepoti], of the manors of Watdene, 
Langeford, and Harham, by the oaths oi . . . . mj> and 
Wil/iam le Duyn, knights, and Walter de Wilton, William de Nevile, 
Walter Huscarle, Richard le Duyn, Herbert le Prute, Thomas de 
Belloners, Thomas . . . , Richard de la More, David de Putton, 
Adam le Frakelayn, Ralph de Bergton .... [who say that] 

Robert Waleraund formerly by his charter granted in his good 
power to Al{an de Plukenel], his grandson, the manors of Langeford, 

'Spelt Plogenet in the writ. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 73 

Waddene, and Hareham, to hold to him and his heirs of the said 
Robert and his heirs, of which said manors the said \_Allan'\ obtained 
seisin for one year and more, according to the tenure of the said 
feoffment. 

The said Robert came into the court at ... . and acknow- 
ledged the said manors to be the right of the said Allan as those 
which he had of the gift of the said Robert, and for his acknow- 
ledgment [the said Allan~\ granted the said manors to the said 
Robert, to hold to him and the heirs of his body of the said Allan 
and his heirs, so that if the said Robert should die with heirs of his 
body the said manors should wholly revert to the said Allan : which 
said Robert [died] without heirs of his body. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 6. 



iSobert malerautiD. 

Inquisition made at Chorngate on the day of St. Matthew 
the Apostle, i Edward I [1273], before Thomas Peveni, sub- 
escheator, in co. Southampton, by Henry de Mere, Walter de Chenne, 
John de Fonte, John Austin, Richard de la Mere, Robert Wycon, Robert 
Nel, Gilbert de la Broke, Thomas de la Mare, William le Eyr, John 
Geffray, and Thomas de la Fenne, who say that 

Robert Walerand only held the manor of Westidal for his life, and 
that after his decease the same ought to revert wholly to Walter de 
Langefford and his heirs, by the covenant made between them that 
Walter de Langefford should have Parva Winterburne, in co. Wilts, 
in exchange for the term of the life of the said Robert, and that 
after the death of the said Robert the said Walter leased the said 
Parva Winterburn, 

The said Robert had no fee in Westideil on the day that he died. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edivard I, No. 6. 



(E^eorge De Cantilupo* 

Extent and inquisition of the lands and tenements which 
were of George de Cantilupo, in the borough of Calne, in 
CO. Wilts, made there in the Morrow of the Circumcision of the 
Lord, 2 \_sic'] Edward I [1274], before Roger de Crofte, clerk of 
Master Richard de Clifford, and Walter Luvel, sub-escheator, by 
Walter Phelipe, Richard le Pope, William Clobbe, Walter Hulle, 



74 Wi it shire 

William Selyman, Nicholas Godeityn, Thomas de Palfe/ord, Richard 
Baldewyn, William Beddy, Richard Antil, Thomas Kin, and Walter 
le Muner, who say that 

The said George held the third part of the said borough with the 
foreign hundred of Calne of the King in chief, paying yearly for 
the same to the King to his Exchequer /^i5. 

There are there in the demesne 4 acres of meadow fit for mowing, 
which are worth by the year 8^., price of an acre zs. Sum, %s. 

There are there 25 burgages which are divided into many parts, 
and pay by the year of rent of assize t,is. i\d., and they make 
foreign service, and they pay to the lord by the year, in the feast of 
St. Martin, 2i\d, and this rent is called Chireshut. Sum of the 
whole rent of the said third part of the said borough, 355. zd. 

There are there 4 virgates of land which are called Burelond, 
and they pay by the year of rent of assize bos., and they also pay of 
aid at the feast of St. Michael 13^. 4^. Sum of the rent and aid 
of the said 4 virgates, 735'. \d. Also the toll of the market of the 
said borough is worth by the year, together with the toll of the fairs, 
60J. Also the said burgesses owe a certain service which is called 
Chuppingavel and Brewingavel, and it is worth by the year \os. 
Sum of the toll, together with the said service, -jos. There is there 
a water-mill, which is worth by the year £\ ^s. There are there 
of view of frankpledge \\s. by the year. The pleas and perquisites 
of the said hundred are worth by the year 40^. The said hundred 
pays to the lord for the sheriffs aid \\s. by the year. Sum of the 
whole issue of the said hundred by the year, £\ \zs. 

Sum of the whole issue of the said borough, together with the 
said hundred, £ 1% \s. bd., and subtracting therefrom the said 
£1^, there remains to the lord by the year bis. bd. 

Milesanda, the wife of Eudo la Zuche, who is of full age, and John, 
son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges, who is under age and in the 
wardship of the King, are the next heirs of the said George. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, N'o. 16. 



(iD»eorge ne Cantilupe* 

InCjUlSltlOn and extent of the manor of Bryhtmerston, who 
was of George de Canlilupo, in co. Wilts, made at Ambresbyr', 
in the vigil of the Epiphany of the Lord, 2 Edward I [1274], 
before Roger de Cro/ic, clerk of Master Richard de Clyfford, and 
Walter Lovel, sub-escheator in the said county, by William le Noble, 
Alexauder le Danays, Richard le Petit, Ale.xander Maud, Thomas Colle, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 75 

'John the clerk, Robert Beissin, Ernisius k Franceys, Geoffrey le Franc, 
Geoffrey Witing, Richard le Loupe, Walter Horn, and Adam le Franc, 
who say that 

The said manor of Brihtmerston is held of the King in chief 
by knight's service. And there is there a certain hamlet called 
Mildeston, and it is held in chief of the Earl of Gloucester by the 
service of half a knight's fee. 

There is there a certain messuage very meanly built, and is worth 
by the year, together with the curtilage, \s. Also a certain dovecote 
which is worth by the year i>s. %d. Sum of the messuage with the 
dovecote, i05'. 8^/. There are there in the demesne 431-2- acres of 
arable land, which is worth by the year/'y is. lod., price of an 
acre 4</. There are there 14 acres of the demesne meadow, which 
are worth by the year zSs., price of the acre 2^. Sum of the 
demesnes by the year, /'8 i\s. lod. And there is there a certain 
several pasture which is called Hulmede, in the which can be 
maintained 16 oxen and 2 plough horses [^affn"\, and the said 
pasture is worth by the year 7^. 6d., price of the pasture of each 
animal by the year 5^/. There is there a certain other several 
pasture for sheep in the which can be maintained 1,000 sheep 
by the year, and the said pasture is worth by the year/ 4 3.?. ^.d., 
price of the pasture of each sheep id. Sum of the whole pasture- 
by the year ^"4 \os. lod. 

There are there of the rent of assize of the free tenants by the 
year z^s. Sd., viz., of Stephen de Brihtmerston for 3J virgates of land 
i\s. bd., of Adam le P^ianc for \ virgate of land %s., of Hugh le Franc 
for \ virgate of land \s., of Peter Alger' for \ virgate of land and 
4 acres of land i lb. of cummin price \d., of Joan de Mudleston for 
a certain virgate of land i lb. of cummin price \d., and they owe 
suit at the court of the lord. 

There are in the vill of Brihtmerston 4 customars each of whom 
holds \ virgate of land, and they pay by the year of rent of assize 
17^. dd., viz., for each .V virgate of land \s. \\d. And the said 
customars owe certain works from the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula 
up to the feast of St. Michael, which are worth by the year \s., 
price of the works of each \ virgate of land \td. And the said 
4 customars owe other small works which are worth by the year 
i6</., price of the works of each h virgate of land \d. 

There are there in the same vill 4 customars each of whom holds 
the fourth part of one virgate of land, and they pay by the year 
of rent of assize \os. 8c/,, viz., each of them 2^. %d. And the said 
customars owe certain works in the Autumn which are worth by the 
year zs., price of the works of each customar (yd. They also owe 



76 Wiltshire 

other small works as washing and shearing sheep and also weeding 
the corn of the lord, which are worth by the year 8</., viz., of each 
of them id. 

Also there are there in a certain hamlet called Mildeston 
5 customars each of whom holds i a virgate of land, and they 
pay by the year of rent of assize 20^-., viz., each of them 4J. And 
they owe certain works in Autumn which are worth by the year 
4J. bd., viz., of 4 of them by the year \id., and of the fifth (>d. 
They also owe other small works which are worth by the year 2od., 
price of the works of each of the said customars ^d. 

There are there in the hamlet of Mildeston 2 cottars each of 
whom holds one messuage and i acre of land, and they pay by the 
year of rent of assize \s., viz., of each of them 2^. There is in the 
said vill a certain cottar who holds one cottage and pays by the year 
of rent of assize 8^. There is in the vill of Brihtmereston a certain 
cottar who holds one messuage and pays by the year of rent of 
assize izd. 

Further, all these customars ought to reap, scatter, raise, take 
away, carry to the house, and put into cocks the meadow of the 
lord, and the said service is worth by the year -;s., of the which 7^. 
the said customars take up again for the said service as in grass, 
and for their drink, which is called Mahdchep, the value of y. jid., 
and so there remains clear to the lord 3^^. ^.id. 

Sum of the whole rent of assize of the said customars and cottars 
by the year, 53^. lod. 

Sum of the works of the said customars by the year, 17^. 6^d. 

And besides this the said customars ought to do a certain service 
which is called chursut, and it is worth by the year zs. gd. 

Sum of the sums as well of the rent of assize as of the works of 
the said customars and cottars by the year, 74J. i^d. 

The pleas, perquisites, fines, reliefs, and other casualties are 
worth by the year 3^. 

The advowson of the chapel of Mildeston belongs to the said 
manor of Brihtmerston, and the said chapel is worth by the year;^4. 

The said customars can be tallaged every year at the will of the 
lord, but they were not accustomed to be tallaged on account of 
poverty, nevertheless the tallage is worth by the year 5^. 

Sum of the sums of the whole extent aforesaid by the year, 

Milisanda, the wife of Etido la Zuche, who was the sister of the said 
George and John de Hastinges, son of Henry and Joan de Hastinges, 
who was the other sister of the said George, are his next heirs. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 16. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. yy 



(George De Cantilupe. 

Ex lent and inquisition of the manor of Caleston which was 
of George de Cantilupe in co. Wilts, made there on Wednes- 
day next after the Circumcision of the Lord, 2 Edward I [1274], 
before Roger de Cro/te, clerk of Master Richard de Clifford, and 
Walter Lovel, sub-escheator in the said county, by Henry Phelip, 
Henry BariK , Richard de la Forde, Richard Coke, Waller Remund, 
Hugh Sagittar\ Richard Taseivard, Waller le Gerisse, Richard Pinel, 
Roger le Frye, Bartholomav de Litlelone, and /ohn Roberd, who say that 

The said George held the said manor of the King in chief by 
knight's service, viz., by half a knight's fee. 

There is there a certain capital messuage, well built, which could 
hardly have been built for loo marks, and he takes back every year 
for the maintenance of the houses zos. at the least. The easements 
of the court and the curtilage, together with the gardens of Calston 
and Blakelonde, are worth 6s. 8d. There is there a dovecote which 
is worth by the year 5^. Sum of the easements of the court, 
curtilage, and gardens, together with the dovecote, i is. Sd. There 
are there in the demesne 350 acres of arable land which are worth 
by the year i i6s. Sd., price of the acre ^d. There are there in the 
demesne in a certain meadow which is called Abbride 12 acres of 
meadow fit to be mowed, which are worth by the year 24^., price of 
the acre 2^. Also in a certain meadow which is called Lachemere 
4 acres of meadow, which are worth by the year 6s., price of the 
acre iSd. Also in a certain meadow of Tasseward 5 acres, which 
are worth by the year -js. 6d., price of the acre iSd. Also in 
a certain meadow called Martinesacre 1^ acres of meadow, and 
they are worth by the year 2s., price of the acre i6d. Also in 
a meadow called Froggehull li acres, worth by the year iid., price 
of the acre Sd. Also in the meadow behind the garden of Wiliton 
i^ acres of meadow worth by the year iSd., price of the acre izd. 
Sum of the demesnes together with the demesne meadow, ^7 i Ss. Sd. 
There is there a certain several pasture on the hill which is worth 
by the year 12s., viz., for oxen and sheep. And there is there 
another several pasture for sheep in the which can be maintained 
350 sheep, and it is worth by the year ^y. ^d., price of the pasture 
of each sheep id. Sum of all the pasture by the year, 45 j. ^d. 
There are there 2 groves which contain in themselves 8 acres, and 
the crop thereof is worth, if it ought to be sold, 32^., price of 



78 Wiltshire 

the acre 4^-. And the soil of the said groves is worth, if the said 
should be cut down, zs. %d. by the year, price of the acre \d. The 
pannage of the pigs is worth by the year \id. And there are there 
of the rent of assize of the free tenants by the year ;^4 t)S. \\\d.^ 
viz., of Henry, son of Bartholomew, of Quemerford, for one virgate 
of land \os., at the 4 principal terms of the year, of Henry Phelip 
for one virgate of land ioj., ol Nicholas de Wichehamio?i for i virgate 
of land 5^., of William Scrip/or for tJ- virgate of land 5^. id., oi Adam 
Snelling for 3 acres of meadow id., of Steph^i Edulf {ox 2 acres of 
land 2</., of Richard Pinel for a certain virgate of land 6^,, of 
Thomas Puke iox a certain virgate of land ']s., o{ Hugh le Schetere for 
one virgate of land 9^., of Nicholas Chinnoke for i virgate 2S., of 
John le Schotere for 1 2 acres of land is., of William Ascer for the third 
part of one virgate of land is., of Henry Pinnoke for one virgate of 
land gj. id., of Eva de Lachemere for \ virgate of land ^s., of the 
widow Sanes for a certain messuage with a croft is., of William. 
Gunnild for a certain messuage with a curtilage i8</., of Henry 
Henteharm for a messuage with a croft 11 Id., of Dazy Horn for 2 
crofts of pasture 4^., of Sibyl, the relict of Foxe, for one messuage, 
one croft, and i acre of arable land, is., and of William the Clerk 
for one croft iid. The sum appears as above. 

Walter Edward holds one virgate of land in villeinage, paying by 
the year of rent of assize los., at the 4 principal terms of the 
year. And he ought to wash and shear the sheep of the lord, and 
that service is worth \d. And he ought to weed the corn of the 
lord with one man for 3 days, and that service is worth \\d. And 
he ought to reap the meadow of the lord with one man for 3 days, 
and that service is worth id. And he ought to raise the hay, 
and to help with one man to make it into cocks for the lord for 

2 days, and that service is worth \d. And he ought to carry the 
hay of the lord with half a cart, together with the carts of the lord, 
for 2 days, and that service is worth 8^/. And he owes two bind- 
days \^precarias'\ with one man in Autumn, and that service is worth 
id. And he ought to carry the corn of the lord with half a cart for 

3 days, and that service is worth \old. And he ought to carry 
the fold \_caula7n'\ of the lord twice in the year, and that service is 
worth \d. And he ought to be tallaged with the other natives. 
And he ought to carry the fold \j:aulam'\ of the lord with a cart for 
one day, and that service is worth \d. Sum of the service and 
works by the year, i is. if\d. There are there 6 virgates in villeinage 
oach of which is held by such service as the said JF«//^r holds by. 
Sum of the service and works of the said 6 virgates of land by the 
year, 74J. id. 



Inqtnsitiones Post Mortem. 79 

Matilda Reynold holds one virgate of land, paying therefor 
yearly of rent of assize -js. \d. at the said terms. And she owes to 
wash and shear the sheep of the lord, and that service is worth \d. 
And she ought to reap the meadow of the lord with one man for 
3 days, and that service is worth yi. And she ought to raise 
the hay and to make it into cocks in the meadow for 2 days with 
one man, and that service is worth id. And she ought with one 
man to make the hav into mowghs (?) for 2 days, and that service 
is worth id. And owes 2 bind-days \^pr€canaf\ with one man in 
Autumn, and that service is worth zd. And ought to stack the corn 
of the lord with one man for 3 days, and that service is worth \\d. 
And ought to reap the stubble with one man for 2 days, and that 
service is worth 3«/. And ought twice in the year to carry the fold 
\caulam'\ of the lord, and that service is worth \d. And owes 3 
averages by the year wheresoever the lord will in co. Wilts at his 
own proper costs, and they are worth \id. And shall give 3 hens 
and one cock, worth T,\d. And ought to cover the stacks of corn 
and grange, with one man, for 3 days, and that service is worth id. 
And owes tallage with other natives. Sum of the services and 
works by the year, \os. i\d. 

Walter le Hert holds one virgate of land by the said service. Sum 
as above. 

Maurice Hirlavine and Walter Chiver hoM one virgate of land, 
paying by the year of rent of assize 7^. bd., and they owe all the 
service aforesaid. Sum of the rent and service of the said Maurice 
and Walter, \os. f,h/. 

Adam, son of Richard, holds \ virgate of land and pays by the 
year 55. of rent of assize, and owes all the service which the said 
Matilda makes e.xcept the averages, to wit, for the said h virgate of 
land. Sum of the rent and service of the said Adam by the year, 7^. id. 

Robert, son of Walter, and Philip de Molendin\ hold 2 half-virgates 
of land by the same service and rent as the same Adam. Sum of 
the rent and service of the same, i4.s'. id. 

Walter Brun holds A virgate of land, and owes all the rent and 
service aforesaid e.xcept chersetum. Sum, bs. g^d. 

Walter Godnvine holds i virgate of land, paying by the year of 
rent of assize \s., and he owes all the service aforesaid like the 
said Maurice, except the reaping, but he ought to make the hay of 
the lord for 2 days, and that service is worth id. Sum, 6s. cjhd. 

Davy Horn holds one messuage with z\ acres of land, and pays 
by the year of rent of assize izd. And he shall give chersetum, 
viz., 3 hens and one cock, and they are worth i\d. And he owes 
to wash and shear the sheep of the lord, and that service is 



8o Wiltshire 

warth id. And he ought to weed with one man for 3 days, and that 
service is worth i\d. And he ought to raise and make the hay in 
the meadow, and that service is worth \d. And he ought to stack 
the hay in the court of the lord for 2 days with one man, and that 
service is worth zd. And to make 2 bind-days in Autumn, which 
are worth zd. And he ought to stack the corn of the lord for 
3 days, and that service is worth ^d. And he ought to reap the 
stubble for 2 days, and that is worth id. And he ought to cover 
the grange and stacks with one man for 3 days, and that service is 
worth 3^. And he ought to carry the fold [caulani] of the lord 
twice in the year, and that service is worth ^d. And he ought to 
carry the writ of the lord throughout the county of Wilts at his own 
proper costs three times in the year, and that service is worth bd. 
And he ought to tallage with his other neighbours. Sum-total of 
the service and works of the said Davy, ^s. o\d. 

William Tredegold holds one cottage with 2 small crofts and pays 
by the year 4</., and makes other services like the said David. 
Sum, IS. i\d. 

Ralph, son of William, holds one messuage and 5 acres of land, 
and pays by the year of rent of assize zs. And owes all the service 
which the said David owes, and besides this he ought to water 
[_apergere] the meadow of the lord for 3 days, and that service is 
worth \\d. Sum of the service and works of the sdUd Ralph, ^s. zd. 

Williavi Semati holds one cottage with 2 small crofts and pays by 
the year of rent of assize 4^/., and he does the other services like 
the said Ralph. Sum, zs. bd. 

John Btintrich holds one messuage and z\ acres of land, and pays 
by the year of rent of assize \zd., and makes the other services like 
the said David. Sum, y. o\d. 

John David holds one messuage and 5 acres of land and pays by 
the year of rent of assize y. \d. And of chersetum, viz., 3 hens 
and one cock, worth i\d. And he ought to wash and shear the 
sheep of the lord, and that service is worth \d. And he ought to 
weed for 2 days, and that is worth \\d. And he ought to raise and 
make the hay in the meadow for 2 days, and that service is worth 
\d. And he owes 2 bind-days in the Autumn, and that service is 
worth zd. And he ought to carry the fold \caulam~\ of the lord 
twice in the year, and that service is worth \d. Sum of the service 
and works of the said yi?A« David, \s. \\d. 

There are there 5 tenants each of whom holds one messuage 
and 5 acres of land like the said John David, paying the same rent 
and doing the same services. Sum of the service and works of the 
said 5 tenants, zos. i\d. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 8i 

Sum of the whole rent of assize of the said customars and cottars 
by the year, £1 os. Sd. Sum of the works of the same by the year, 
5 IS. 6}[d. Sum of the sums as well of rent of assize as of the works 
of the said customars and cottars by the year, £^ izs. i\d. And 
besides this the said customars and cottars ought to be tallaged 
every year at the feast of St. Michael, and that tallage is worth 
2 6 J. %d. by the year. 

There is there a certain water-mill which is worth by the year 
zbs. Sd. And the view of frankpledge of the said manor is worth 
by the year 20J. The pleas, perquisites, fines, and reliefs are 
worth by the year 6^. 8d. Sum as well of the view of frankpledge 
as of the pleas and perquisites by the year, 26s. Sd. 

Sum of the sums of the whole extent aforesaid by the year, 
;^28 151. lod., besides the sale of the wood, which is appraised at 
g2j. by the appraisement of the soil of the said 2 groves, which is 
appraised at 3^. Sd., if the wood be sold once. If the crop of the 
said groves be not cut down, nor the soil of the same appraised, 
the said groves are worth by the year towards the maintenance of 
the houses, the enclosing of the hedges and repairing the folds of 
the lord, 6s. Sd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 16. 



(George He Cantilupe* 

Extent and inquisition of the manor of Rocle, which was of 
George de Catitilupe, in co. Wilts, made there on Thursday 
next after the Circumcision of the Lord, 2 Edwafd I [1274], before 
Walter Luvel, sub-escheator in the said county, before Roger de Cro/ie, 
clerk of Master Richard de CUfforde, by William de Cardevile, Nicholas 
de Polton, Adam Siward, Walter le Pike, Richard Quint in, Thomas de 
Rocle, John le Novel, Simon le Franceis, William, de Okeburne, Thomas 
Joup, Peter Crume, and Thomas de Kenete, who say that 

The said George held the said manor of Rocle of Six John Tregoz 
in chief by the service of half a knight's fee, paying therefor 
yearly to the keeper of his castle of Ewyas Harald 13^. \d. 

There are there certain buildings, badly built, which are worth 
the year, together with the curtilage, \id. 

There are there in the demesne 432 acres of arable land, which 
are worth by the year £\ los., price of the acre z\d. 

There is there a certain several pasture for the demesne beasts 
of the lord in the which can be maintained 16 oxen and 2 plough 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. II. 6 



82 Wiltshu'e 

horses, and it is worth by the year gj., price of the pasture of each 
beast zd. 

There is there a certain several pasture for the sheep in the 
which can be maintained 70^) sheep, and it is worth by the year 
5 8 J, 4</. And there is there a certain other several pasture which 
is called Rotheresdune, and it is worth by the year 13J. \d. 
Sum of the whole pasture by the year. £\ os. Sd. 
And there is there of the rent of assize of the free tenants by the 
year 25^. 8d., viz., oi Peter Crounie for one virgate of land, rs. ; of 
John le Neive for one virgate of land, 8j. 6d. ; of William de Okeburn 
for one virgate of land, 6s. ; of Roger the clerk for ^ virgate of 
land, I lb. of pepper, price %d. ; of Thomas de Rokle for one virgate 
of land, 6j. ; of Ralph the carpenter for one messuage with one 
croft, 2S. ; of Robert le Lting for one small croft, bd. 

There are there 9 virgates of land of villeinage, each whereof 
pays by the year of rent of assize ds. And each virgate owes certain 
works from the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula up to the feast of 
St. Michael, and the work of each virgate is worth for the time 
aforesaid zs. And each of the said virgates owes 3 averages by the 
year, and they are worth 1 zd. And each virgate ought to weed 
the corn of the lord for z days, and that service of each virgate of 
land is worth by the year \d. And there is there of rent of assize 
oi John Herlewin for one acre of land, ^d. 

Sum of all the rent of assize of the said villeins by the year, 
54^- id. 

Sum of the works of the said customars by the year, z-^s. ^d. 

Sum of the sums of all the rent of assize and the works of the said 
customars by the year, £if zs. And besides this the said customars 
ought to be tallaged every year at the feast of St. Dionisius, and 
the said tallage is worth by the year 33^. \d. 

There are there 2 cottars who pay by the year of rent of assize 
zs., and they hold 2 messuages and 2 crofts, and they do 3 works 
in Autumn which are worth by the year 3^/., price of each work \d. 
Sum of the rents and works of the said cottars, zs. ^^d. 

And there are there of a certain rent which is called chersetum^ 
18 hens and 6 cocks, and they are worth by the year zs., price 
of each id. Also the pannage of the pigs is worth by the year 20^. 
Sum as well of the rent of chersetum as of the pannage, 3^. ?>d. 

The pleas, perquisites, fines, and reliefs, and other casualties, are 
worth by the year 5^. 

Sum of the sums of the whole of the extent aforesaid, ;^i 6 y. id. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 16. 



Inqiiisitiones Post Moi'tem. 83 



ce^eorge De Cantilupe. 

Wl tnCSSCS brought to prove the age of George de Caniilupe, 
before the Council of the King at Westminster, on Sunday 
from the day of Easter in 3 weeks, viz., in the vigil of the Apostles 
Philip and James, i Edward I [1273]. 

Brother Peter, Prior of Honiton or the order of the Carthusians, 
says that the said G. \_sic'] was born at Bergeveny on Good Friday, 
in the 35th or 36th year of the reign of King Henry, father of the 
King that now is [1251 or 1252], and this he knows because he was 
at one time chaplain to William de Cantilupe, grandfather of the 
said (r., and at the time the said G. was born he was attending 
to the execution of the will of the said William de Cantilupe 
in the place of William de Cantilupe, Bishop of Worcester, and 
William de Cantilupe, father of the said G., executors of the said 
will. The said William, grandfather of the said G., died in the 
year of the birth of the said G. or in the preceding year. The 
report of the country is that the said G. was' aged 21 years on 
Good Friday last past. 

V>xQ\\\tx John, Master of the Hospital of St. Mark of Billesv/yk, 
outside Bristol, says that he knows for certain, according to the 
report of the country and by the relation of trustworthy people, 
that the said G. was aged 21 years on Good Friday last past, 
and this he knows because he was ordained priest 25 years ago, 
and the father of the said G. died at Calneston now 18 years 
ago, and the said G. was born at Bergeveny 3 years before his 
death. And this appears clear to him because he was a native of 
the parts of Calneston where the said William died and had land. 

Alan de Wanton, knight, agrees with the priors as to the age and 
birth of the said G., and says that he was aged 22 years last 
Good Friday, and this he knows by the common report of the 
county and by knights and other trustworthy people who told him 
in good faith. 

Peter de Bruges knows that the said G. was born 21 years ago, 
because he was then at Bruges Walteri with the constable of the 
castle, who in the morrow of Low Sunday next following the said 
Good Friday held the hundred of Bruges, where report reached 
them of the birth of the said G. at Bergeveny. About one or 
two years after the birth of the said G., King Henry, father of 
the King that now is, crossed over into Gascony. 



84 Wiltshire 

Robert de Trillek agrees with the above, and adds that he knows 
it by inspection of the chronicles in the Priory of Bergeveny, and 
he heard the men of Bergeveny disputing among themselves as to 
the age of the said G., and in the end they agreed that he was 
21 years old in that year. 

Thomas Creyk agrees with the above, and he knows it because 
Anastasia, his wife, was first married to Richard Wason, who had 
by her a son who is now canon at Briweton, and who was born in 
the same year as the said G., to wit, in the feast of All Saints 
now 2 1 years ago, and the said G. was born at Bergeveny on 
Good Friday next following. 

Robert Blundel well knows that the said G. is aged 21 because 
he was sent as a messenger to Bergeveny by Sir Thomas Corbet to 
William, father of the said G., to seek for the land of the said 
Thomas, his lord of Lydeham, who on Wednesday, in the week of 
Easter, came to Bergeveny, where he found the wife of the said 
William in childbed with the said G. 

John de Baskervill knows the same by the account of knights and 
other trustworthy people of the country of Bergeveny. 

Henry Murdak says as above. 

John Faukes, of Dertemuth, knows the age of the said G. by 
inspection of the chronicles in the Priory of Totnes (Totton), in 
CO. Devon. 

William de Merle knows the age of the said G. by the oath of 
Sir Adam de Gurdun and other trustworthy people who were of the 
household of William de Cantilupe, father of the said G. 

John de Pychejord agrees with the said William de Merle, and adds 
that he married a kinswoman of the said G., viz. the daughter 
of William de Ebroiris. And he diligently enquired as to the age 
of the said G. of Sir Adam de Gurdun and Sir Robert (.?) de 
Tregoz and others who were of the household of the said William 
de Cantilupe, father of the said G. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 16. 



mhttt, mn of il5ict)ola0. 

At the end of an inquisition taken at Bolemer on Monday 
next after the Conception of the Blessed Mar}-, 2 Edward I 
[1273], occurs the following note : — 

Be it known that the said Robert, son of Nicholas, had in 
CO. Dorset a certain manor which is called Cvnnok, of the which 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. S5 

he did not die seised because Sir Ralph de Bakeput held and still 
holds the same of the gift of King Henry by the dictum of Kenely- 
worth as it is said. 

Also Sir Robert Waliraunt held a certain manor in co. Wilts 
which is called Herham in like manner, which was of the said 
Robert, and of which he did not die seised ; therefore may it please 
the Lord Chancellor to give me to understand what was to be done 
concerning the said manors. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I ^ No. 19. 



flUaltet tie auben^* 

Inquisition made at Wichford on Friday next before the 
feast of St. Martin, i Edward I [1273],' of the manor of 
Wichford, which was of Walter de Aubeny, before Walter Lovely 
sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by John de Lange/ord, Peter Gray, 
Robert Sireman, Herehert de Childhamtone, William Weliband, Alan 
de Lange/ord, John Richir, Roger de la Sale, Simon le Fraunceys, 
Geoffrey Warin, William Bartelot, and Walter le Frye, who say that 

There are there 4. carucates of land containing in themselves 
500 acres of land, price of the acre \d. Sum, £'i bs. Sd. 

There are there 32^ acres i rood of meadow, price of the acre 
1 Sd. Sum, ^qs. i^d. 

There is there a pasture indivisible for 32 beasts, and it is worth 
per annum los. Sd., viz., ^.d. per head. 

There is there a pasture for 400 sheep, and it is worth by the 
year Ss. 4^/., because the pasture is poor. 

Of the rent of assize by the year £g 16s. g^d. at the 4 terms 
of the year by equal portions, viz., of 18 customars holding virgates 
of land. 

Of the rent of chersetum at the feast of St. Martin, 158 cocks 
and hens, price per head id. Sum, 13J. 2d. 

There is there a certain mill, and the issue is worth per annum 
20s. The easements of the court, with the garden and curtilage, 
are worth per annum 1 35-. ^d. 

There is there a certain dovecote, and the issue is worth per 
annum 6s. Sd. 

, The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth per annum 
i^s.jfd. 

There is there a certain chapel belonging to the said manor, and 
it is worth \os. 
7 * 



86 Wiltshire 

Walter de Aubetty held the said manor of the heirs of Robert de 
Aubeny by the service of half a knight's fee in chief. 

The said Walter, on the day that he died, held nothing of the 
King in chief in co. Wilts or. elsewhere. 

Henry de Aubeny, brother of the said Waller, is his next heir, and 
is of full age. 

Sum of the sums, £i(i \%s, zd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edivani I, No. 23. 



jl5ic]^ola0 'BurDutt. 

Inquisition taken at Paulesholte on Monday next, in the 
vigil of the Decollation of St, John the Baptist, i Edward I 
[1273], before Walter Luvel, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by the oath 
of Wygan de Chereburg, Richard Purchas, William Sturdi, John 
Kambo, William Self, Reginald de la Nyivetone, Stephen Daniel, 
Nicholas Siward, John de Chereburg, Hugh de Baldeham, Walter de la 
Forde, and Gilbert le Vel, who say that 

Sir Nicholas Burdun had 3 carucates of land in the vill of 
Paulesholte, which contain in themselves 240 acres of land, price 
of the acre 3</. ; also 33 acres of meadow, price of the acre 18^., 
and the dovecote is extended at iid. The profit of the garden and 
the easement of the court are worth per annum los. bd. The 
profit of the wood within the manor is worth per annum p. 
The profit of the wood within the forest is extended at 2s., and 
contains in itself 14 acres of land which is distant from the manor 
by s leagues, and nothing can be taken without the licence of the 
forester. The pasture for 40 oxen and 25 beasts at ease is extended 
at 32J. 6d., viz., 6d. a head. The pasture for 200 sheep is extended 
at 3^. because it is poor and unwholesome. The pannage of the 
pigs, according to more or less, is extended at iSd. The profit 
of the mill, saving the cost, is extended at icy. Of the aid of 
villeins, los. by the year. Of the rent of the free tenants by the 
year, 36^., to be paid at the 4 terms of the year by equal portions. 
Also the rent of customars and cottars by the year, £4. los. 6d., to 
be paid at the 4 terms of the year. The rent of hens and cocks, 
viz. 60, is extended at 5^. ^d. The pleas and perquisites and 
casualties extend to zos. 

Robert Burdun is the son and heir of Sir Nicholas Burdun, and 
completed his 27th year on the vigil of SS. Simon and Jude last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward I, No. 28. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 87 

iiriatilDa (KLTaleraunt), 

Writ dated 25th October, i Edward I. 

The King to the Sheriff of Wilts, commanding that an extent and 
appraisement be made of the third part of the manors of Langeford, 
\yhadden, and Harnham, with the advowson of the Church of 
Whadden, which Matilda, who was the wife of Robert Walerand, 
claims as her dower against Alan de Plogenet, whereupon the said 
Alan calls to warranty the King, who had the custody of the body 
and lands of Robert, son of William Walerand, grandson [^nepotJ] and 
heir of Robert Walerand, against her. 

Extent and appraisement made of the third part of the 
manors of Langeford, Wadden, and Harnham, by William 
le Buteler, Peter de Mokndino, Walter Thomas, Ralphe le Franke, 
Thomas le Rus, John Martin, Richard le Shouvere, Philip Buterstyp, 
John le Jeofne, Richard le Jeofne, Walter ad Pontem, Robert Ode, and 
Richard Turgys, who say that 

In the manor of Langeford there are in the demesne 150 acres 
of arable land, price of each acre bd., whereof the sum of the third 
part is 25J. There are there 16 acres of meadow, price of each 
acre 2^., whereof the sum of the third part is \os. 8d, There are 
there 8 acres of pasture appraised at los., whereof the sum of the 
third part is 40^. The garden is appraised at 26s. j^d., whereof 
the third part is Us. lo^d. The dovecote is appraised per annum 
at 5^., whereof the sum of the third part is zod. In the rent of the 
free tenants 25^., whereof the sum of the third part is Ss. ^d. Also 
3 capons, price 9^., whereof the sum of the third part is 3^. 
Of the rent of the customars 35J. "jld. with chersetum, whereof the 
third part is i\s. io\d. 

In the manor of Wadden there are in the demesne 200 acres of 
arable land, price of each acre 5^., whereof the sum of the third 
part is 27J. <)d. and the third part of a penny. There are there 
16 acres of meadow, price of each acre 18^., whereof ihe sum of 
the third part is 8j. The pasture of the oxen, cows, and sheep 
is appraised at 14.J. 4^., whereof the sum of the third part is \s. 9«/. 
and the third part of a penny. The garden is appraised at one 
mark, whereof the sum of the third part is 4J. ^d. and the third 
part of a penny. The rabbit warren is appraised at is., whereof the 
sum of the third part is iid. The rent of freemen and villeins 
is 72^. and i lb. of pepper, price iid., whereof the sum of the third 



SS Wiltshire 

part IS 24J. 4//. Also for the works of 13 villeins, if they are sold, 
26s., whereof the sum of the third part is %s. Sd. Also for 
chersetum I'jd., whereof the sum of the third part is si</. and the 
third part of a halfpenny. Also in ploughing, ^s., whereof the 
sura of the third part is i6d. The Church of Wadden is worth 
per annum 7 marks. Sum of the said third parts, except the 
advowson of the Church, £^ os. g-}d. and the third part of a 
halfpenny. 

At Estharnham there are in all things 100s., whereof the sum of 
the third part is 33J. 4<f. 

At Westharnham there are in the demesne 212 acres of arable 
land, price of each acre 6d., whereof the sum of the third part is 
37J. There are there 18 acres of meadow, price of each acre i6d., 
whereof the sum of the third part is 8^. There is pasture for 
16 oxen and 7 cows, the pasture of each ox and cow ^d., whereof 
the sum of the third part is 3^. 2d. and the third part of a penny. 
There is pasture for 300 sheep, 4 always to be appraised at id., and 
the sum of the third part is 2s. id. The garden is appraised at 
$s., whereof the sum of the third part is i2d. The dovecote is 
appraised at 5^., whereof the sum of the third part is 2od. The 
rent of the free tenants is zi^d., whereof the sum of the third part 
is jd. and the third part of a halfpenny. The rent of the villeins 
with their works is 9 marks, whereof the sum of the third part 
is 40J. The perquisites of the court at the feast of St. Martin and 
at Hokeday 4^., whereof the sum of the third part is ibd. The 
fishing at the mill at Fisserton is appraised at ^od., whereof the 
sum of the third part is 10^. 

This extent was delivered to be carried to /ohn Martin and 
Richard Turgys, 2 of the 20 [sic] jurors. 

Sum of the said 3 parts in Estharnham and Westharnham, 
£fi 9J.. (?) and the third part of id. and one halfpenny. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward T, No. 35. 



\/ ICW of the state of the manor of Clarendon and of the 
* forest of Clarendon with their appurtenances made on 
the day of St. Michael, i Edward I [1273], by Walter de Stircheslegh, 
then sheriff of Wilts, and by Sir Hugh le Engleis, John de Grimstede, 
John de Monemue, and Walter de Dernford, knights, by command of 
the King, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 89 

By the view which they made the hall of the King requires 
a roof of shingles and to be mended. Also the buttery without the 
wall of the same hall on the north part. The pantry and butlery 
are in good condition, with the exception that 2 windows are 
wanting in the butlery. In the buckhouse [^hircario] 3 windows 
are wanting. The kitchen of the King needs a roof. The servants' 
kitchen is in good condition. The scullery needs the mending 
of a certain gutter. The cloister between the hall and the said 
kitchen needs a roof and the mending of the gutters. The 
chamber and chapel of the King are in good condition. The gallery 
between the hall and the King's chamber needs a roof. The wheel 
of the well needs repairing. The 'joists of the inner chamber of 
the Queen were burnt when the King was last at Clarendon, and it 
greatly needs repairing and mending. The gutters of the Queen's 
chapel with the ceiling and painting of the same require repairing 
and mending. The gallery between the King's chamber and the 
Queen's chamber needs roofing and repair of the gutters. The 
room with the fireplace beyond the great cellar is in ruins and 
almost unroofed, wherefore it greatly needs repairing. And the 
other room beyond the said cellar needs a roof. The combing 
[cumbluni] of Nevile's chamber is rotten in one part, and the 
other part needs roofing. The steps to the postern are broken 
and need repairing. The battlement gutters [altire'] of the same 
postern are entirely unleaded, but they were never before leaded. 
And the gutters of the said postern need repairing. The room 
of the Queen's wardrobe needs to be roofed and mended in the 
gutters. The saltery, chaundlery, and wardrobe of the King need 
roofing. The wardrobe of Maunsel's chamber needs roofing. 
The almonry needs roofing, and the chimney of the same is in 
ruins, and the wall of the said almonry needs to be repaired in 
parts. The stable of the said almonry needs roofing. In the 
common {}) foreign chamber there is wanting a door, 5 windows, 
and planks, whereof there is great need of repair. Two rooms 
for the King's children need roofing, and there are wanting there 
5 windows and one door. The room o^ John le Fauknur and the 
house of the barber require roofing and repair of the walls. The 
King's stable and the stable of the bailiff need rafters, and manger 
\jnanjuris~\, and roofings. And it is fitting that the small gate there 
be made anew. 

And so it is seen that Stephen de Baddeworth (.^) gave up the said 
manor in a poor state, and John Russel received it in the same state. 

And they say of the forest that many oaks are blown down to the 
ground at Clarendon, and very many branches there have been 



90 Wiltshire 

cut off as well in times past as recently, but the underwood there 
is well kept. As to the venison, they say that there are not many 
old deer there, but it is reasonably well filled with deer and young 
beasts. 

The. park of Clarendon is badly enclosed. And the demesne 
wood of the King at Alilcet is well kept as well as regards the vert 
as the venison. 

The wood of the King at Gravelings is badly kept as regards vert. 
There are there many wild goats, but few other beasts. 

Chan. Inq. p.ra., i Edward I, No. 41. 



muiiam ^auDutt. 

InCIUlSltlOn made by Nicholas de Lusteshall, James de 
Grundeswell, William de Lusteshull, Sitnon de Mordon, Henry 
de Grundeswell, Robert de Wydihull, Elias Underhull, Henry le 
Waleys, William son of John, William de Walecotc, John Aylmer, and 
Henry le Osilyur, who say that 

William Mauduyt was indicted at Yvecestre before William 
Everard, Alan de Wanton, and their fellows, justices of the King for 
the gaol delivery of Yvecestre in co. Somerset, for the theft of 
2 horses which were taken out of the cart of a strange carter, and 
was hanged at the suit of the said carter, and also because he 
broke out of the gaol of Gloucester and escaped thence. 

He held at WestwydihuU in co. Wilts half a knight's fee oi John 
Maiiduyt, whereof the year and the waste belong to the King by 
reason of the felony aforesaid which he perpetrated, but the land 
lies uncultivated. The meadow and pasture of the said unculti- 
vated land is worth by the year zos., and the rent of assize is 
worth by the year 32^., and the waste of the houses is worth half 
a mark. And after the said William was hanged John Aylmer, 
bailiff of the Countess oi Albemarle in the hundred of Worthe, took 
the said tenement into the hands of the King out of the hands of 
Sir Peter de Chavent, to whom the King now 3 years ago gave the 
same, and the said John ought to answer for the same. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edivard /, N'o. 59. 



Inqtiisitiones Post Moi'tem, 91, 



2lUlUaiu jHauDuit- 

InCIUlSltlOn made on Tuesday next before the feast of 
St. Margaret, i Edward I [1273], by Nicholas S/iganf, 
William Wilsond, Synioii de Mordofi, Thomas de IVikham, John son of 
Gregory, Nicholas de Insula, John de Hardinton, Roger de Camera, 
Nicholas Pay en, Anketil de . . . , Robert de Leye, and John de 
Clive, clerk, who say that 

The land which was of William Maudule in West WidihuU was 
not in the hand of the King except from Thursday before the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary up to the Tuesday aforesaid, 
and he held the said land of Sir John Treygoz, paying therefor 
yearly for the ward of the castle of Ewias half a mark; and John 
Ayelmer, bailift' of the hundred of Worth, took all the issues of the 
said land during the said time, and shall answer to the King for 
one whole year and a day unless the King shall make another 
keeper. And it is worth by the year in rent of assize 32^., in 
meadow one mark, in pasture los., because the land is cultivated, 
and the house upon the messuage to be sold \os. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edivard I, No. 59. 



i^atDijsta De iLonDon. 

Extent made at Havedom manor formerly of Hawisia de 
London, in co. Wilts, before Sir Stephen de Drues, sub- 
escheator in the said county, on Friday next after the feast of 
St. Michael, 2 Edward I [1274], by lliomas k Nuny, John Page, 
Henry Nigr , Richard le Mayster, James de Groridavell, Roger de la 
Burgie, Thomas Albiin, Walter Byscope, John Noutim, Henry Cutee {}), 
Walter Keynes, and Peter Bedell, who say that 

There are there 200 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth 
by itself dd. And 'loo acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
itself \id. Also pasture for 60 beasts, and the pasture of each 
beast is worth by itself %d. Also one dovecote, which is worth 
per annum zs. %d. The easements of the court and garden are 
worth per annum 3^. There is there one vivary which is worth \zd. 
The rent of assize is worth per annum £c). The Autumn works 
are worth 215-. %d. The pleas and perquisites by the year ;ire 



92 Wiltshire 

worth bs. 2>d. The water-mill is worth per annum zos. Also 
chersetum per annum is. iid. The yearly tallage in the said 
manor is bbs. Sd. 

Also the extent made by the same of the manor of Inglesham 
on the same day and year. They say that there are there 60 acres 
of arable land, and each acre is worth by itself 6d. Also 25 acres 
of meadow, and each acre is worth by itself izd. There is no 
pasture except by purchase. The rent of assize per annum is 14s. 
The works per annum are worth ly^d. The easements of the 
court and garden per annum amount to i6d. 

The said manor of Havedon is held of the King in chief by the 
service of half a fee, and the manor of Inglesham is held of the 
King in chief by the serjeanty of keeping one hoe \_/ios/oriuffi]. 

The said Havuisia was thereof seised in her demesne as of fee on 
the day that she died ; and Sir Pagan de Cadurciis is her son and 
next heir, and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward I, No. 7. 



InCJUlSltlOn and extent made at Comptun of the lands and 
tenements which were of Nicholas de Haveresham, deceased, 
on Saturday next after the feast of St. Gregory, 2 Edward I [1274], 
before Walter Lovel, sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by Hugh le 
Chamberleyn, Robert Petefin, John le Bor, Robert de Domerham^ 
Geoffrey Co/, Robert Co/, 'Geoffrey de Stanton, Walter Pram, Gilbert 
le Taylur, William le Skinnere, Geoffrey de Cumpton, and Roger Baret, 
who say that 

There are there 2 carucates of land containing in themselves 
250 acres of land, price of the acre ^d. Sum, £\ y. ^d. The 
easements of the court, with the fruits and herbage of the garden, 
is worth per annum 6s. 8d. Sum, 6s. Sd. The dovecote is worth 
per annum 6d. Sum, 6d. The mill there is worth per annum 
6s. Sd. Sum, 6s. Sd. The meadow there is worth per annum 10s. 
Sum, 10s. The demesne pasture is worth per annum, for 24 beasts, 
Ss., price per head ^d. Sum, 85-. There is there pasture for 100 
sheep, price per head ^d. Sum, ^s. id. The bracken there is 
worth per annum 2^-. The pleas and perquisites, fines and reliefs, 
are worth per annum \os. Sum, 48^-. 



Inqnisitiones Post Mortefn. 93 

The Rents and Services of the Free Tenants. 

They say that Gilbert le Tailur holds one virgate of land, 
paying therefor yearly 6i'. bd. at two terms of the year, viz., at 
the Annunciation of the Blessed-. Mary 3^. 3^., and at the feast 
of St. Michael 3^. ^d. Sum, bs. dd. Henry Wildegos holds 
10 acres of land, paying therefor yearly one pair of gloves at 
Easter, price zd. Sum, zd. Robert Co/ holds one plot of 
meadow, paying therefor yearly i lb. of pepper at the feast of 
St. Michael, price of the pepper ■]d. Sum, ']d. John Cof holds 
one acre of land, paying therefor yearly \zd., viz., at Pentecost 
bd., and at the feast of St. Michael bd. Sum, izd. Walter 
Pram holds one manse with 6 acres of land by charter, he 
and his heirs to find every night in the year a light in the 
mortuary in the Church of St. Michael for ever. And a light with 
4 lamps to be burning at the celebration of each Mass. Richard le 
Chapelir holds one manse with one small croft, paying therefor 
yearly \%d. at the four terms of the year, viz., at the Nativity of the 
Lord it\d., at Easter \^d., at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 
\\d., and at the feast of St. Michael \\d. Sum, \%d. Thomas 
Marescall holds one manse, paying therefor yearly at the feast 
of St. John the Baptist one garland of roses. Margery Dubliers 
holds one manse with 2 acres of land, paying therefor yearly 4J. 
at the said terms by equal portions. Sum, ^s. Thomas Gen-ays 
holds half a virgate of land with one messuage, paying therefor 
yearly i^s. ^d. at the said terms. Sum, 13^'. 4</. Sibilla Langelof 
holds one manse with a curtilage, paying therefor yearly ^s. at the 
said terms by equal portions, and owes works which are worth 5^/. 
Sum, 5J. 5^. 

Sum of the sums of the rents of the free tenants within the 
manor, 32^'. bd. 

Rents and Services of the Customars holding 

ViRGATES OF LaND. 

Johti Pil'ecok holds one virgate of land, paying therefor yearly 
13J. ifd. at the said terms by equal portions, and owes works which 
are worth per annum 5J. i\d. Thomas Edivard, William Cof, and 
John Gervays hold in like manner and service as the saidyb/i« Pilecok. 

Sum of the rents and services of the customars holding virgales 
of land, 84J. bd. 

Rents and Services of those holding Half- 

VlRGATES OF LaND. 

Walter Skidemore holds half a virgate of land, paying therefor 



94 Wiltshire 

yearly 6^. M. at the said terms by equal portions, and he owes 
works which are worth 2^. ']\d. 

Robert Gregory and Godi'a, the widow, and Robert Skidimore and 
John Gregory and Robert Holewee and Geoffrey Pyes and William 
Welmed and Agnes, relict of Hugh, and Richard le Lung and Robert 
Gelus and Alice, the relict of Curtays, and Walter le Curtays and 
John le Monck and Godfrey Bercar and Richard Skidemore and yi?A;^ 
(r<?/aJ and Elienor Monacha (?) and Geoffrey le Welbe and Gunild, the 
relict of the miller, and Nicholas ate Brok hold in like manner and 
service as the said Walter Skidemore. 

Sum of the rents and services of those holding half-virgates of 
land, £q 15-r. 6J^. 

Cottars. 

They say that Si?non Blaunchepye holds one manor with one small 
croft, paying therefor yearly 2^. at the said terms by equal portions, 
and shall give one cock and one hen for chersetum at the feast 
of St. Martin, price zd., and he owes work, and that service is 
worth zd. Thomas Alolend' holds one manse with one croft, paying 
therefor yearly 5^. at the said terms by equal portions for all 
service. Basilia, the widow, holds one manse with one croft, paying 
therefor yearly 4^. at the said terms by equal portions, and ha 
ought to mow the meadow of the lord for one day, and the work 
is extended at \d., and be ought to work with one man at the 
workdays of the lord in Autumn for one day, and the work is 
extended at \d. Amicia, the widow, holds one manse with one 
croft, paying therefor yearly zs. at the said terms by equal portions, 
and shall do the like service except mowing the meadow. Matilda 
Ate Tuneseinde, Alice le Sivalawe, Alice Le Do, John Gelus, Matilda, 
relict of the miller, William Fabian, Ralph Halpenye, Sibilla le Lunge, 
William Lachedeby, and Michael Doget, hold in like manner as the 
said Basilia. John Curtays holds one house, paying therefor 
yearly nd. at the said terms for all service. 

Sum of the rents and services of the cottars, 565'. ^d. 

Stephen Molendinar holds one manse with one croft, paying there- 
for yearly 4^. at the said terms by equal portions, and ought to 
reap the corn of the lord for one day in Autumn, and the work 
is extended at \d. Elias atte Croft holds one manse with one 
small croft, paying therefor yearly 5^. at the said terms in equal 
portions, and ought to reap the corn of the lord for one day in 
Autumn, and that service is worth \d. Matilda, the relict of 
Kaynolf, holds one manse with one croft, paying therefor yearly 
\(id. at the said terms, and ought to carry the meadow of the 
lord for one day, and that work is extended at \d., and ought to 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 95 

reap for one day, and it is worth \d. Mary Curlays holds in like 
manner and service as the said Matilda. Alice, the relict of Payn, 
holds one manse with one croft, paying therefor yearlj' \2d. at the 
Said terms by equal portions for all service. Adam le Houpere holds 
one manse with one small croft, paying therefor yearly 4^'. at the 
said terms by equal portions for all service. Alice, relict of 
le Freinsse, holds one manse with one small croft, paying therefor 
yearly ^s. at the said terms, and ought to mow the meadow of 
the lord and to carry the hay, and that service is worth 2d., and 
ought to reap for one day, and that service is worth \d. Matilda le 
Thressercs holds one house with one small croft, paying therefor 
yearly i2d. at the said terms, and ought to mow for one day, 
and it is worth id. Alice Fie . . . holds one manse, paying 
therefor yearly izd. at the said terms and making the same 
services as the said Matilda, fohn Gregori holds one small 
curtilage, pa)ing therefor yearly, at the feast of St. Michael, 
\d. for all service. Robert Holewe holds in like manner as the 
^d\^ John Gregori. Thomas Edivard '^oXdi'?, one small park \_parriik'\, 
paying therefor yearly 6</. at the four .... terms, viz., at the 
Nativity of the Lord, at Easter, at the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist, and the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary. Alice Curtays 
holds one meadow, paying therefor yearly qd. at the said terms by 
equal portions. William Cof holds one meadow, paying therefor 
yearly lod. at the said terms for all service. Geoffrey Paxs holds 
2 acres of land, paying therefor yearly i2d. at the said terms by 
equal portions for all service. Sum, 27^. "jd. 

The issue of the wood is worth per annum, with the pasture, los. 
The pannage of the pigs, according to the small number (.^), is 
worth per annum \d. Sum, 10s. ^d. 

All the tenement of Comptun is held of Sir John de Grimstede 
in chief for half a knight's fee, paying therefor yearly to the said 
John 1 5 J. And to the TvOrd Edjmmd, Earl of Cornwall, 20X. yearly 
for ... . 

Joan, daughter of Nicholas de Haveresham, is his next heir and is 
aged 33 weeks, and is in the custody oi Joan, her mother. 

Extent and inquisition made at le Marays. They say that there 
is there one carucate of land containing in itself 59 acres of arable 
land, price of the acre ^d. Sum, 19J. 2>d. There is there a certain 
. . . . and It is worth per annum ^s. The easement of the 
court, with the fruits and herbage of the garden, is worth per 
annum zs. Sum, zs. 

Sum, 26J. ^d. 



96 Wiltshire 

The manor of Cumpton is held of the Earl of Cornwall as is 
abovesaid. Sum, 26^. 8</. 

As to the foreign rent belonging to the manor of Compton, the 
jurors say that Ralph Viring, at Putton, holds one virgate of land at 
Putone of Richard Cusyn, paying therefor yearly to Sir Nicholas de 
Haversham and his heirs 8j. id. at the four terms of the year by 
equal portions for all services. 

Robert Eode, of Puton, holds there one virgate of land except 
2 acres of the said Richard, paying therefor yearly gj. bd. for all 
services, like Ralph Viring. 

William de Sancto Amero and Waller Causepye hold in Brutford 
one hide of land of Sir /ohn de Grimeslede, for the which hide the 
said William and ff^//^r pay per annum 26^. tothe lord of Comptune 
and his heirs at the four said terms by equal portions. 

Richard de Bryan, parson of Grimestede, holds one manse with 
8 acres of land and 2 small pieces of meadow, paying therefor 
yearly %s. for all services. Agnes le Carpentere holds one messuage 
in Grimestede, paying therefor yearly \id. at the feast of 
St. Nicholas for all service. Cristina Sturefiss holds in the same 
manner and service. 
- Sum, 53J. %d. 

Wynterburne Daniel. They say that Ivo holds one messuage 
with a curtilage, paying therefor yearly at the Nativity of the Lord 
\zd., at Easter \zd., at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist \rd., 
and at the feast of St. Michael \id., for all services. Adain le Saucir 
holds a virgate of land, paying therefor yearly zos. at the said 
terms by equal portions for all services. John de Bernvyk holds in 
like manner and service. The rent of these three men was pledged to 
Sir Nicholas de Haveresham, father of the last Nicholas, conditionally 
that when Geoffrey Daniel or his heirs should pay to the said 
Nicholas or his heirs 50 marks of silver, that they shall then 
immediately have again the said rent. 

Richard de la Sale was wont to pay yearly at the feast of St. Luke 
the Evangelist, to Sir Nicholas de Haveresham, i$s. ; he lives in 
CO. Hampshire, but they do not know for what tenement. 

Sum, 59J., with 15^. in co. Southampton which ought to be dis- 
charged because it is answered for there in the extent made there. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edivard I, No. 30. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 97 



31o]&n De 'FetDon* 

Extent made at Stokes of the lands of 'S>\t John de Verdon, 
on Saturday next after the feast of All Saints, 2 Edward I 
[1274], before Sir Stephen le Drueys, escheator in co. Wilts, by the 
oath of Robert Russei, John le Wafre, John Alexander, Roger Andren, 
John le Bigge, Roger Coquus, Martin de Molend\ Thomas de 
Gerardeston, Adam Toleth, Symon Wither, Hugh Walebron, and 
Wtlliam Alexander, who say that 

There are there 200 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth 
by itself 6</., and 3 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
itself 4^. There is there pasture for 16 oxen, and the pasture of 
each is worth per annum ^d. And pasture for 300 sheep, and the 
pasture of each is worth \d. Of rent of assize per annum £1 \, viz., 
at each term 55J. The easements of the court and garden, 2^. 

The said manor is held of the Abbess of Wilton, paying to the 
same £\ i. 

Theobald de Verdun, son of the said John de Verdun, is his next 
heir, and is of full age. 

He held nothing of the King in chief in the said county. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward I, No. 34. 



9|o]^n De 'Femon. 

Extent made at Wiveslesford of the lands of Sir John de 
Verdun in the hundred of Wanderdich, on Saturday next 
after the feast of All Saints, 2 Edward I [1274], before Sir Stephen 
de Drueys, escheator in co. Wilts, by the oath of Roger de Seresy, 
William Cleudi, Waller le Blond, Michael Scot, Walter Pachet, Henry 
le Templar, Henry de Seresy, Thomas le Frankelayn, Geoffrey de 
Wodejord, Peter de Hale, Richard Vinas, and Robert le Hopere, who 
say that 

There are there of arable land 80 acres, and that each acre is 
worth by itself 5</., and 9 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth 
i8</. There is there pasture for 6 oxen, and the pasture of each is 
worth id. Also pasture for 300 sheep, and the pasture of each 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. 11. 7 

8 



98 Wiltshire 

is worth ^d. Of rent of assize per annum £^ \s. Also the ease- 
ments of the court and garden are worth zs. 

The said manor is held by the service of keeping one wax candle 
before the high altar of the blessed Mary in the Church of Sarum, 
to bum by day and by night for ever. 

The said John was seised in his demesne of the said manor on 
the day that he died. 

Theobald de Verdun is the son and next heir of the said John de 
Verdun, and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward I, No. 34. 



giol^n le 'Balun* 

Extent of the manor of Six John le Balun, lately deceased in 
Magna Chyverel, made on Monday, viz., in the Morrow 
of St. Michael, 3 Edward I [1275], before Sir Stephen \_le Drueys'], 
sub-escheator in co. Wilts, by the oath of Gilbert de Aula, Richard 
Ennok, William Gule, Richard le Blund, Richard Twelie, Humphrey 
Faber, William Morin, John Calne, Robert de Camera, Richard de 
Haubervile, John de Wodebrigge, and Henry Beren, who say that 

There belong to the said manor 81 acres of arable land, price 
of the acre 8</. : sum 54-r. bd. Also 15 acres of meadow, price cT 
the acre zs. : sum 30J. Also the rent of assize per annum of the 
issues of the whole manor: sum j£s js. lod. Of tallage at the 
feast of St. Michael : sum 2 marks. Of the perquisites of pleas 
and perquisites of court : sum ^ mark. The easements of the 
houses, court, and garden, i mark. One dovecote, price 4J. per 
xnnum, i^lb. of wax for rent, 8 capons. Also for chersetum 
yearly 45^. iid. Also pasture for 40 oxen, and it is worth per 
tnnum zos., price of the ox 6d. Also the pasture for the sheep, 
iz., 200 and a half, is worth per annum zos. lod., price of the 
;heep id. Sum-total, £1^ zs. id. 

Sir Walter le Balun is his next heir, and is of full age. This 
lanor is held of the King in chief for the service of one knight. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 3 Edward I, No. 19. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 99 



Extent of the manor of Wockes, in Wiltshire, made on 
Friday next after the feast of St. Faith the Virgin, 
3 Edward I [1275], before Sir Geoffrey de Morleya, by the oath of 
Robert de Brade/eld, Henry de Lond\ John de Sianes, Robert de la 
Wyke, Ralph Sely, Robert Seman, William son of Richard, Richard 
/am/or, Gregory son of Gilbert, Henry de Morleia, Reginald called 
Le Engles, and Andreiv Cissor, who say that 

The manor of Wockes is worth every year and common years 
£^1 bs. Sd., as well in rents, demesnes, meadows, pastures, woods, 
fines and perquisites, gardens, dovecotes, easements of courts, as 
in waters and mills. 

Humphrey de Bohun is of the age of 24 years, and is the next heir 
of Sir Humphrey, formerly Earl of Hereford. 

The said manor is held of the King in chief by the service 
of constable. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 3 Edward I, No. 32. 



I nCjUlSltlOn made on Tuesday next before the feast of 
X St. Thomas the Apostle, 3 Edward I [1274], at Chyppeham, 
before John de London, then escheator of this side the Trent, by 
Walter de Sneppe, Peter de Baldenham, Roger le Cras, Richard de 
}Vykes, Nicholas Lucas, Walter Dru, Robert Dru, Reginald Burell, 
Richard Payn, Henry Andr*, John de Lundr\ Hugh de Burle, Roger 
Kyngesman, \yilliam le Gaun . . . , Walter le Cornmaungere, 
Roger Elys, William Heved, William le Draper, John de la Barre, and 
Robert Soket, who say that 

Nicholas de la Huse, knight, was enfeoffed of the manor of 
Rughedon on the day of Holy Trinity, 2 Edward I [1274], and 
on the Sunday next following he had seisin by Ralph de la Hyde, 
attorney of Henry de Semmor, of whom was the said manor. The 
said Nicholas had seisin of the whole for 3 weeks before the said 
Henry had committed the felony charged on him. 

The said manor is held of the King in chief by the service of 
£"] los. per annum for all service, saving the tallage to be made 
when the King shall think fit to tallage his other demesnes. 

Chan. Inq. p.vi., 3 Edward I, No. 33. 



lOO Wiltshire 



I nqUlSltlOn made on Wednesday next after the feast of 
X St. Wulstan at Westbury, before Hildebrand de London, sheriff 
of Wilts and escheator, 5 \jic\ Edward I [1277], of the lands and 
tenements of Philip Marmiun, by the oath of Geoffrey Hose, William 
de Wytclive, Davy Duraunt, Walter de Parco, Thomas de Cuierigge, 
William Colswayn, John de Swnnigg\ John de Holeweye, Davy de la 
Redelonde, Walter Colston, Walter de Done, William Bruchun, William 
Blannchard, William Crunny, William de Upton, Robert de Burton, 
and Peter de Testewde, who say that 

Philip Marmyun held in his demesne on the day that he died 
io\ virgates of land, viz., 7 virgates of the land of the 2 demesnes 
of Reginald de Pavely and of the heirs of Thomas Maudud, by 
knight's service, paying therefor when scutage occurs one mark, 
viz., half a mark to Reginald de Pavely, who is the firstborn, and 
half a mark to the heirs of Thomas Maudut, who is the issue of 
a younger sister. The said 7 virgates of land contain 140 acres 
of land, and each acre is worth by itself bd. Sum, 70J. 

He held of Sir Richard Dansy, of Dulton, one virgate of land 
which is arented at zs., to be paid to 10 marks \_sic] by the hand of 
Richard Dansy at the serjeanty of the King, and doing the services 
due and accustomed to the lord of the fee. After the death of Sir 
Richard there succeeded to him Richard Dansy, his son and heir, 
who was in the wardship of the King until his lawful age, and then 
took his lands and tenements, and was a pauper and unable to pay 
the said rent at a certain term as his father had been wont to pay it. 
Then the sheriff of Wilts commanded the bailiff of the hundred of 
Westbury to distrain him and all his tenants to pay the said rent, 
and so by distraint the said tenants paid the said rent by the hands 
of the same to the said sheriff, and the said Philip held nothing of 
the King in chief in any other way. And the said virgate of land 
contains 20 acres, and each acre is worth by itself td. Sum, los. 

He held one virgate of land of Thomas de Tetteburne for los., 
which contains 20 acres, and each acre is worth by itself 6d. : 
sum los. He also held of Richard Saver 17^ acres, and each 
acre is worth by itself dd. : sum Ss. gd. And he pays per annum 
to the heirs of Richard Saver iid. He also held of Robert de 
Bortone 3 acres of land, and pays therefor zd. per annum, and 
each acre is worth by itself 6</. : sum 18^. He also held of 
John Adelelin 3 acres, and each acre is worth by itself bd. : sum 



tnquisitiones Post Mortem. loi 

i8</. Also of William Savery z acres, which are worth by 
themselves \id. Also of John de Lye a certain croft which 
contains 4 acres, and each acre is worth by itself td. : sum %s. 
He held there 20 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
itself 2J. : sum 40J. Also pasture for iz oxen, and the pasture 
of each is worth bd. Also pasture for 1 2 cows and 1 2 beasts at 
ease, which are worth per annum 135. There is there of rent 
of assize per annum 57J. 6</. There is there a service and 
custom which is worth per annum gj. 3</. There is there 
chersetum which is worth per annum zs. o\d. Sum, 68f. ()\d. 
The pleas and perquisites there are worth per annum 6j. %d. 
The easements of the court, together with the profit of the 
garden and one dovecote, are worth per annum ts. Sd. 
Sum, 135. 4</, 

Philip Marmiun, senior, had a son and heir who by his wife 
had issue a son named Roger, who is the next heir of Philip 
Marmion, senior, and is aged 17 years. 

Chan, Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 7. 



William le Moynnyr, Walter de Parco, Thomas le Lung, William 
Hendyman, John Sunging, James Le Jovene, John Wynebold, William 
le Knizt, Thomas de Cuderigge, Walter de Edendon, Walter Le Doene, 
and Henry Le Tumur, who say that 

Philip Marmyun, deceased, held one virgate^-of land of Thomas 
de Teltehurn in Westbury and Bremelrigge. He also held o^ John 
de Lye 15! acres of land in Westbury, Brockes, and Bremelrigge, 
with a certain croft which contains 4 acres of land in La Hurste 
and 3 acres of meadow in Brockes and Bremebrigge. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 7. 



I^l^ilip iHatmton. 



InO UlSltlOn madeat westbury on the day of the Assumption 
of the Blessed Mary, 5 \jic~\ Edward I [ 1 277], before Hyldebrande 
de London, sheriff of Wilts, of the lands and tenements of Philip 
Marmyon, by the oath of William Molendinar', Walter de Parco, 
8 * 



I02 Wiltshire 

Walter de Edindone, Thomas de Cuderugge, William Colsweyn, Waller 
Slywand, Edward Stywand, John Esstmund^ {?), John Wynebold, 
Roger de Fonte, Nicholas Fraunkelyn, William Handyman, Saverick de 
Penlig', Thomes Le Lung, Peter Ennokes, John de la Bruere, David de 
la Redelonde, William Gunygin{}), Ivo de Suninges, Adam Undercly, 
Arnold de Hewode, Henry le Turner, and William de Molend*, who 
say that 

Philip Marmyon held in his demesne on the day that he died 
1 1 acres of land and 5i virgates of arable land, viz., 7 virgates of 
land of the 2 demesnes of Reginald de Pavely and of the heirs 
of Thomas Maudut, by knight's service, paying therefor when 
scutage shall run one mark, etc. 

[The rest of this Inquisition is a duplicate of the inquisition 
taken on Wednesday next after the feast of St. Wulstan, 5 Edward I, 
and given above.] 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward J, No. 7. 



Inquisition made before Sir Hyldehrand, sheriff of Wilts, 
on Sunday next after the feast of St. INFatthew the Apostle, 
5 Edward I [1277], by 12 jurors of the hundreds of Westbury, 
Wemenister, and Wernclesdon, viz., Walter Sewille, William le 
Moynnyr, Symon Horkedale, Walter Colstoyn, Walter Stiward, Peter 
le Wyte, William, Munte, Robert le Ku, John de la Forde, Walter 
de Edendon, Robert de Hombrigge, Thomas de Kuderigge, William 
Blanchard, and Hugh Benservise, of the lands and tenements of 
Philip le Marmyun, lately deceased, who say that 

The said Philip held in Bremelrigge 1 1 librates of land, 17J. \o\d. 
in all issues as in rents, villeinages, dowers, and other things, and 
the custody up to the full age of the heir of the said tenement is 
worth ;^33 3^-. td., viz., by the year £,% ^s. \o\d., except the food 
and clothing of the said heir. And the marriage of the same is 
worth £\i hs. Sd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward /, No. 7. 



Inquisit tones Post Mortem. 103 

InCJUlSltlOn made at Bremelrigge before Sir Hyldebrand, 
sheriff and escheator of Wilts, on Wednesday next after the 
feast of St. Gregory the Pope, 4 Edward I [1276], of the lands 
and tenements which were of Philip Marmyon, by the oath of 
Humphrey de Brudelig, Walter Sewale, Laurence de Bosco, William le 
Moynnyr, Simon Horkedale, John de Holeweye, Arnulphus de Hewode, 
William Grunny, William Drunin, Nicholas de Haverigge (?), Saverick 
de Penlig\ William Colsweyn, William Blanchard, Hugh de Kuderigge, 
Thomas de Kuderigge, Roger de Fonte, Roger le Sansyr, Ralph le Veyn, 
and Roger Hurdy, who say that 

Richard Dansy held in Bracton and Dulton certain lands and 
tenements of the serjeanty of the King for the which he kept the 
King's larder, and the said serjeanty was arrented in part at the 
time of his death to the said William. To him succeeded Richard 
Dansy, his son and heir, who changed his service without warrant 
for another, viz., to find for the King one (?) servant \_serviens'\ on 
horseback ... in his army for . . . days at his own 
cost. For this change the said Richard made his fine for himself 
and his tenants for the said tenements before Sir Robert Passelewe 
with their consent, viz., 10 marks per annum. The said tenants 
answered the said Richard for the third part of his tenement per 
annum, and the said Richard p^d the residue of the said fine for 
the part which he held because he changed his service without 
warrant, and he shall do the service of half a knight's fee by the 
year. The said Philip Marmiun held thereof one virgate of land 
which was arrented at 2j., to be paid to the King by the hand of 
the said Richard, and nevertheless he shall make to the lord of that 
fee by agreement between [the said Richard and the said Philip^j 
the services therefor first due and accustomed, and which virgate 
of land Peter son of Warin claims to have of the gift of the said 
Philip. The said Richard Dansy the son was in the wardship of 
the King until he came to his lawful age, and then he took his 
lands and tenements and was a pauper and unable to pay the said 
rent at certain terms as his father had been wont to pay it. 
Then the sheriflf of Wilts commanded the bailiff of the hundred of 
Westbury to distrain him and all his tenants to pay the said rent, 
and so by distraint the said tenants paid the said rent by the hands 
of the same to the said sheriff. The said Philip held nothing in 
any other way of the King. 



I04 Wiltshire 

He held of Sir Reginald de Pavely 6 virgates of land in the manor 
of Westbury in chief, which contain 1 20 acres of arable land in the 
demesne, and each acre is worth by itself td. : sum £1. He held 
of the fee of Sir Thomas Maudut in the same manor 6 virgates of 
land, which contain 120 acres of land, and each acre is worth by 
itself dd. : sum £1 ; making therefor knight's service for the third 
part of one knight's fee to the said 2 lords when scutage shall 
happen to be levied. He held there 20 acres of meadow of the 
same, and each acre is worth by itself zs. : sum \os. There is 
there pasture for 12 oxen and the pasture of each is worth 6</., 
and pasture for 1 2 cows and the pasture of each is worth by itself 
\d., and pasture for 12 beasts at ease and the pasture of each is 
worth by itself 3^. : sum i is. There was there of rent of assize 
per annum 57^. td. The services and customs of certain tenants 
in villeinage are worth per annum 9^. ^d. The chersetum of the 
same is worth per annum zs. o\d. Sum, b%s. g^d. The pleas 
and perquisites there are worth per annum 6s. Sd. The easements 
of the court, together with the profit of the garden and dovecote, 
are worth per annum Cs. Sd. Sum-total, ^12 16^. i^d. 

The said P/iih'p had 2 sons, the one called F/i/'/ip and the other 
William ; and the said Philip the firstborn, who died before his father, 
kept a certain woman for his wife as long as he lived, and by her 
had a son called Roger, but they do not know for certain whether 
he married her. The said William, the younger son, married and 
had a son. The said Philip the father had 2 daughters, who are of 
full age, viz. Eva and Ysolde. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 7. 



F 



jiRoger £>Ut)er. 

XtCnt and inquisition made of the lands and tenements 



-1— y which were of Roger Oliver in the vill of Swaleclyve, before 
S)\x Hyldebrond de Lond\ sheriff and escheator of Wilts, on Saturday 
in the Morrow of St. Valentine, 4 Edward I [1276], by Richard de 
Haveneber', Robert de Swaleclyve, William Peyk, Geoffrey Wysdom, 
Richard Lussh, William de Bewyk, William Mathy of Nippred, 
William Borhogg, Robert le Tayllur, Stephen Lugg, John Quarter, and 
William Spone, who say that 

Roger Oliver held his court in that vill of John de Maundevyle in 
chief, and that court is worth with the garden \s. per annum. 
The said Roger also held a curtilage wherein is situated a messuage. 



tnquisitiones Post Mortem. 105 

and it is worth per annum is. He also held of the said John 
3 virgates of land in the demesne in the said vill, which contain 
71 acres, and are worth per annum 35^. bd., price of each acre bd. 
Also of the %z\d. John in the said vill a certain little meadow, which 
is worth per annum \id. The chase belonging to the said 
tenement is worth per annum bs. The said Roger might have 
every year one plough horse and 8 beasts (?) in a certain pasture, 
and that pasture is worth per annum \^d. 

William Persune held one messuage with a curtilage and 2 acres 
of land for the whole life of the said William and Matilda, his first 
wife, and gives per annum 3J. 3^., and digs for flax(?)[a</ Z/«] for 
one day, and that service is worth* i«/. because he eats altogether 
with the lord. He will help to make heap [mullon], and that service 
is worth \d. And he will help to carry the meadows for half a day, 
and that service is worth \d. 

Henry Scorevell holds a messuage and curtilage and 2 acres of 
land at the will of the lord, and gives per annum 3^., and does the 
services like William above. 

Thomas West holds one piece of land of the fee of the said Roger, 
and gives per annum id. Sum, $is. 7^. 

For which said tenement there are paid every year at the court 
of Sutton which was oi John de Maundevyle 19^., out of which there 
ought to be paid to Sir John de Perham is. td. by the hand of the 
chief lord of Sutton or by the hands of his assigns. 

And the said John de Maundevyle and his heirs or whoever may 
be the chief lords of Sutton are bound to acquit the said tenement 
which was of Roger Oliver of all services by the said rent. 

John Oliver, son of the said Roger, is his next heir, and was 
6 years ago on the feast of St. Michael, 3 Edward I [1275]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 30. 



IKoger €)litier, 

I nqUlSltlOn made by command of the King on Friday 
A next before the vigil of Pentecost, 4 Edward I [1276], before 

the sheriff and escheator of Wilts, by the oath of James Lucy, 
William Mahu of Lynlye, William son of John Mahu of Nippard, 

Richard de Havevenher' , Roger le Tayllur, Robert le Tayllur, Richard 

le Lus, Walter Gilberd, Robert Davy, Robert Tulle, Richard de la Dene, 

and John Attejorde, who say that 



1 06 Wiltshire 

Roger Oliver, deceased, held by homage in the vill of Swaluwe- 
clive half a hide of land of John de Mandevile which belongs to 
the manor which was of the said John de Sutton, paying therefor 
yearly bd., and making suit at the court of the %2i\^ John de Sutton 
every 3 weeks for all services to the said John belonging, and 
making suit in like manner at the hundred of the King of 
Boneworth every 3 weeks. 

The said Roger held by homage one virgate of land in the said 
vill of Swaluweclive of the said John de Mandevile, which said 
virgate is of the fee of Thomas Cosyn, paying to the said John 
and his heirs zs. 6d., and to the sheriff of Wilts to the use of the 
King for the aid of the sheriff s^\d. for all services to the said land 
belonging. 

The said Roger when his father died was within age, and the 
next of kin on his mother's side had the wardship of him, and not 
the ancestors of the said John de Mandevile. The said Roger and 
his ancestors were wont to do all the said services from the time 
that they were first enfeoffed of the said lands and tenements, and 
no others. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 30. 



^8ne0, tl)e tuife of l^enr^ tie Canneber. 

Inquisition made at Fitelton on Friday in the vigil of 
St. Thomas the Apostle, 4 Edward I [1275], before Hilde- 
hrand de London, sheriff of Wilts and escheator, of the value of the 
land which was of Agnes who was the wife of Henry de Candever, 
by the oath of Simon de Littecote, Thomas Trenchejoil, Roger de 
Quercu, John de Fijhide, Edmund de Tormailles, John de Estcote, 
William Maleweyn, Eustace son of John, William Dicuns, Peter 
Crollebois, Richard de Rikingehale, John Laurens, and John de Bello 
Monte, who say that 

The said Agnes held of the King in chief in her demesne as of 
fee on the day that she died one carucate of land in Fitelton, 
paying therefor yearly to the hand of the bailiff of the King at 
Clarendon bd. at the feast of St. Michael. 

There is there one messuage which is worth per annum 5^. 
There are in the said carucate of land 191 acres of arable land 
altogether which are worth per annum 63^. 8(/., price of the acre 
\d. Of the said acres of land only the moiety can be sown by the 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 107 

year. There is there a certain piece of meadow which is worth 
per annum 2^. There is there of rent of assize 70^. per annum. 
There is there pasture for 300 sheep which is worth per annum 15^. 

The said Agnes died without an heir, and they know no heir 
thereto except the King. 

Sum of the value, £"] i^s. Sd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward /, No. 33, 



%^\^XK, 0on of ^Ol^tT, 

Inquisition made at Churiel before Sir Hildehrand de 
Londres, escheator of the King in co. Wilts, on Saturday in 
the feast of St. Clement, 4 Edward I [1275], by Philip de Berewike, 
Henry Phelip, Bartholomew de Litletone, William Alwich, William 
Seotere, John de Karswelle, John de Dayvile, Walter Reymund, Robert 
de Barevile, John Roherd, William Tulluc, and Richard Coche, who 
say that 

Sir /ohn, son oi John, held the manor of Churiel in chief of the 
King by one knight's fee, but they do not know by what service. 

The said Sir John had on the day that he died in demesne at 
Churiel 268 acres of arable land, and they are worth per annum 
£b \\s., price of the acre bd. 

The said Sir John had at Cowiche 64 acres of arable land, and 
they are worth per annum 32^., price of the acre bd. In the 
demesne of Churiel 24^ acres of meadow, and they are worth per 
annum 24^-. bd., price of the acre \zd. Also at Cowiche 10 acres 
of meadow, which are worth per annum \os. Also at Churiel 
pasture for 16 oxen, and it is worth per annum %s. Also pasture 
there for 600 sheep, and it is worth per annum 48^. 10^., viz., for 
each head \d. Also 16 acres of pasture at Cowiche, and they are 
worth per annum %s. Also 2 acres i p. of garden, and they 
are worth by the year 3^-. The mill is worth per annum \os. 
Also 67 acres of wood, whereof the lord takes nothing but 
housebote and heybote, and it is worth per annum 13J. 4^. The 
perquisites of the court with the heriots are worth 30J., and the 
easements of the court with the dovecote \s. 

Walter Reymund holds one carucate of land, and pays therefor 
yearly i lb. of cummin, price id., and he owes suit at court every 
3 weeks. Henry clericus holds one virgate of land, and pays by 
the year i lb. of cummin, price \d. Also 15 holders of virgates. 



io8 Wiltshire 

6 holders of half-virgates, and 9 cottars ought to work from the 
feast of St. Peter ad Vincula up to the feast of St. Michael, and 
the works are worth 28^. And they pay per annum £\i \\s. 
Also 62 hens for churechset, and they are worth 5.?. id., price of 
the capon \d. 

Richard, son oi John, was the brother o^Six John, son o^John, and 
is his next heir and is aged 30 years. 

Also 180 eggs, price 5^., and i lb. of pepper, price lod. 

There are there 10s. to be taken at the feast of St. Martin of the 
men of the same manor, which they give so that they may not be 
troubled, and los. from the same at Hockeday for the same. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward /, No. 47. 



E 



iol^u, £(on of giol^n* 

XCGnt of the manor of Winterslewe, which sometime was 
of John son of John, made on Monday in the feast of 
St. Katherine, 3 Edward I [1274], before Hildebrand de London, 
then sheriff and escheator of Wilts, by the oath of William de 
Boscumbe, David de Put lone, Ralph Vyring, Robert Oede (?), Nicholas 
Dodde, Ralph de Bereghlone, Odo Dunpol, William Severe, Adam 
Godchild, Simon Froggemere, Thomas le Chalkere, and Adam le 
Fraunkeleyn, who say that 

There are in the said manor of Winterslewe 247^ acres of arable 
land in the demesne to be tilled each year, which are worth per 
annum ;^8 5^., price of the acre M. Also \o\ acres of meadow, 
which are worth per annum 15J. 9^., price of the acre 18^. There 
is there a several pasture for 3 plough teams of oxen from the term 
of Hokeday up to the gule of August, which is worth per annum 
zs. Also pasture for 200 sheep and 300 ewes in common, which is 
worth per annum zos. lod., price of the pasture of each sheep ^d. 
There are there £S 1 os. 2d. of rent of assize by the year, as well of 
free tenants as of villeins. There is there one windmill, which is 
worth per annum 1 6^. There are there 40J. of the tallage of the 
villeins at the feast of St. Michael. Also 20s. to be taken at 
the feast of St. Martin of the men of the said manor, which they 
give so that they may not be troubled. And 20s. from the same at 
Hokeday for the same. There is there one wood which is called 
Hundewude, whereof the lord of the said manor ought to sell up 
to the sum of 20s. towards the aid of the farm of the said manor. 
The lord of the said manor and his men may have in the said 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 109 

wood housebote and haybote which is extended at i oj. per annum. 
There is there pannage of the pigs by the year which is extended 
at %s., to be paid at the feast of St. Martin. Also herbage of the 
beasts at the same term which is extended at 145. 4^, There are 
there 109 cocks and hens of chiruchschet, which are extended at 
9^. \d., price of the hen \d. The pleas and perquisites with the 
fines of the lands are extended at 26^. %d. per annum. The herneta 
and chevage are extended by the year at half a mark. There is 
there the rent of i lb. of wax, which is worth per annum 5^. There 
are there 22 plough shears of the rent of Putton by the year, which 
are extended at i \s. The easement of the court with the issues of 
the garden is worth per annum loj. 

Ralph de Bereghton, who holds freely one virgate of land, ought 
to plough one acre of wheat and another of oats, whereof the 
ploughing is extended at bd. There are there customary men 
having 12 carucates each, of which carucates ought to plough 
one acre of wheat and another of oats, whereof the ploughing is 
extended at bs., price of the ploughing of an acre 3//. quit. And 
they ought to harrow the said acres, which is worth ts., viz , for each 
acre \d. There are there 31 customars, each of whom ought to 
harrow the oats for 3 days before dinner, and the harrowing is 
worth 7^. qd., viz., for each day's work before dinner \d. And the 
said customars ought to wash and shear the sheep of the lord for 
3 days, which is worth 3^. loW., viz., for the washing and shearing 
of one day \d. And they ought to weed the corn of the lord for 
3 days before dinner, which is worth 23^^., viz., for each man 
for the said days \d. before dinner. And they ought to find 2 men 
to carry the meadow for one day, whereof the work is worth 31^., 
viz., for each 2 men id. by the day. And they ought to carry the 
hay, whereof the work is worth lod. There are there 8 holders of 
virgates and 7 holders of half-virgates, each of whom ought 4 times 
in the year to carry the corn of the lord to the market, which is 
worth 7 J. 6d., price of each day's work \\d. There are there 400 
eggs of rent at Easter, which are worth iid. There are there 
5 holders of virgates and 4 holders of half-virgates, who ought to 
carry the hay of the lord with a horse and cart in Autumn until it is 
carried, and afterwards other autumnal works up to the feast of 
St. Michael, whereof the work is worth ()s., viz., for each man 
lid. There are there, moreover, 25 holders of half-virgates and 
other customars, who ought to reap the corn of the lord in the 
Autumn and to do other autumnal works, whereof the work is worth 
50J., viz., the work of each man 2s. 

Sum, ;^33 iqs. Sid, 



no Wiltshire 

John, son of John^ held the said manor of Winterslewe of the 
Earl of Cornwall of the honour of Borekhamstede in fee farm, 
paying therefor ;^2o by the year. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 47. 



31o]^n De iHaunDettlL 

Know, Sire, that the sheriflF of Wilts has taken the manor of 
Sutton into the hand of the King, and has commanded the 
people that they be solely attendant and answerable to him for all 
manner of issues of the same manor since the Wednesday next 
before All Saints, upon which Wednesday he made the oath at 
London to take charge of the office of escheator in the county of 
Wilts, as he had in the same county affirmed, and the jury showed 
his warrant which he had on behalf of the King in the court of 
Sutton, before the freemen and the others . . . that he took the 
seisin on behalf of the King, that is to say, the morrow of 
St. Edmond the Confessor, for the which may it please you to send 
us your pleasure as to this and other things. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, JVo. 48. 



I nC[UlSltlOn made at Wilton on Wednesday in the week of 
A Pentecost, 4 Edward I [1276], whether the manor of Sutton 
be of the inheritance which was oi John de Maundevile, who held of 
the King in chief by barony, whether he held it for life according 
to the law of England as that which was given in free marriage to 
John de Maundevile, father oi Joan de Maundevile, with Agnes, mother 
of the said John, to hold to them and the heirs of the body of the 
said Agnes, and whether the said Joan be the next heir of the said 
Agnes, by the oath of William le Botyller of Breteford, William de 
Bretisyerd, Robert Gerard, James de Lucy, Walter Gelebert, Robert 
Davi, Roger Davi, Roger Andrew, Randulph le Franc, Richard de la 
Dene, John de Gerardeston, Thomas de Gerardeston, and William Pik 
of Donehevede, who say that 

Geoffrey de Maundevil gave to a certain Dru de Barantyn the said 
manor of Sutton to acquit the said Geoffrey of Judaism [Judeismo] ; 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 1 1 1 

after this the said Dm gave the said manor to John de Maundevile, 
son of the said Geoffrey, in free marriage with Agnes his daughter, 
to hold to her and the heirs of her body. 

The said Joan, daughter of the said John and Agnes, is the next 
heir of the said Agnes. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward /, No. 48. 



9!o]^n De iHaunDebilL 

Extent made at Sutton on Wednesday in the feast of 
St. Edmund, King and Martyr, 4 Edward I [1276], of the 
lands and tenements of Sir John de Maundevill, before Sir Stephen 
le Drueys, escheator of the King in co. Wilts, by Roger Olyver, 
Robert Tayllur, William Borog, Richard de Haveneber\ John Turgis, 
Roger Tayllur, John le Blund, John de Cruce, Thomas Vvo, Henry de 
Molend, William son of Nicholas, Stephen Lug, Thomas de Cruce, 
Robert David, Robert Tubbe, Richard de la Dene, William super 
Montem, and Henry le Hankere, who say that 

There are there 229 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth 
by itself bd.: sum £^ i^. 6d. Also 16 acres of meadow, and 
each acre is worth by itself iid.: sum ibs. Also 20 acres of 
wood, and each acre is worth by itself ^d. : sum 6^. 8</. Also 
pasture for 16 oxen, and the pasture of each is worth by itself per 
annum \d. : sum 5^. 4^. Also pasture for 200 sheep, and the 
pasture of each is worth per annum id. : sum 4^. zd. Also of 
rent of assize of the villeinage per annum 525-. ^d. Also of the 
rent of the freemen of Sutton ly., 3i lbs. of pepper, jibs, of 
cummin, ilb. of wax: sum zs. Also of the rent of the freemen 
of Swalfklyfe its. i\d., and of Hugeford [sic~\. Also of the rent 
of the fee of Denemede 6oj. Also of chershete per annum is. 
Also of the herbage of the oxen io\d. Also of the pannage of the 
pigs id. Five men ought to sow, each of them by himself \ acre 
of wheat, and it is worth 20^. Of the pleas and perquisites of the 
court per annum loj. The easements of the court and garden 
10s. There is there in the manor of Sutton a certain church, the 
advowson whereof belongs to the lord of the said manor, and 
the church is worth per annum 10 marks. The said manor is held 
of the Earl of Gloucester for one knight's fee, and owes suit at the 
court of the Earl at Kranebory every 3 weeks. 

John, son of Sir John de Maundevill, is his next heir, and is aged 
16 years and more. 



1 1 2 Wiltshire 

The said 60s. of the fee of Denemede are owing to the same 

Robert de Denemede by the year. 

Sum, £i-i 4J. lid. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward /, No. 48. 



31o]^n De i^aunDebill. 

Extent of the manor of Sutton Maundevyle made on 
Wednesday in the feast of St. Vincent, 4 Edward I [1276], 
by James de Lucy, Richard de Haveneber' , Robert West, Roger David, 
Robert David, Richard Chaunterel, Robert Tawyer, Robert Tubbe, 
Roger Tayllur, Richard de la Dene, William de Farnhult, dind John 
Blunt, who say that 

The capital court of the said manor with the garden is worth per 
annum with the easements and the park zos. There are there 
in the demesne 229 acres of arable land, price of each acre bd. : 
sum 114J. dd. Also 16 acres of meadow, price of each acre izd. : 
sum i6j. Also 27 acres of wood, and the easements of the said 
wood are worth every year as in stakes for the fold and for the 
walling and roofing of the house, enclosing of hedges, and for fuel : 
sum 9^., price of the acre 4^/. The lord of the said vill might 
have in the common pasture of the said manor 2 plough horses, 
16 oxen, and 6 cows, and the pasture of each of them is worth per 
annum 4//. : sum 7^. 4^. Also 200 sheep, and the pasture of each 
sheep is worth per annum \d., for 4 one penny : sum 4J. id. The 
said lord may have and sustain in the same manor 100 lambs in 
the common pasture, and the pasture of every lamb is worth \d. : 
sum 4J. td. He may also have in the fields and pastures of the 
said manor 25 pigs, and the easement of each pig is worth per 
annum id.', sum zs. id. 

Thomas le Venor holds one virgate and one furlong of land in 
knight's fee and pays per annum 2 lbs. of pepper, worth 18^., and 
I lb. of cummin worth id. John Turgys holds one virgate of land 
in the same manner, and pays per annum lilbs. of pepper, worth 
i3i</., price of the lb. 9^/., and 2 lbs. of cummin, worth zd. William 
Clericus holds in the same manner one house and one curtilage, 
and pays per annum i lb. of cummin, worth id. Robert Manduth 
holds one messuage with a curtilage, and pays per annum i lb. of 
cummin, worth id. Stephen de Bedejord holds \ virgate of land in 
the same manner, and pays per annum \ lb. of wax, worth z\d. 
William de Bedejord holds i\ virgates of land in the said vill, and 
pays per annum izd., and holds by knight's fee. John le Wyte 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 113 

holds in like manner 8 acres, and pays per annum \zd. Malecoia 
holds one manse and curtilage, and gives per annum \id. Cecil de 
Bosco holds one furlong of land, and gives per annum \td. Thomas 
Yve holds in the same manner \ virgate of land, and gives per 
annum \\d. John de Cruce holds one furlong of land in the same 
manner, and gives per annum 3^. Nicholas Burdeyn holds in Ogeford 
2 virgates of land in like manner, and gives per annum 4_y. 5^^. 
Thomas de Stopp' holds 6 acres of land at Funtel in like manner, 
and gives per annum 6</. Margery de Reygni holds one messuage 
with a curtilage in socage, and gives per annum \o\d. Robert 
Clericus de Swaleclive holds one messuage and curtilage in the same 
manner, and gives per annum \2\d. William de Farnhull holds 
half a virgate of land in like manner, and gives per annum bd. 
Roger Oliver holds 3 virgates of land in like manner, and gives per 
annum at the court of Sutton igx., out of which there are paid to 
Sir John de Perham every year of the manor of Sutton is. td. for 
one virgate of land. John de Lye holds one garden in like manner, 
and gives per annum 2s. The Master of Anestygh holds one 
virgate of land in like manner, and gives per annum i\d. Sum of 
the whole rent of assize of the freemen and sokemen, 39^. 9^. Out 
of this there arfe paid every year by the hand of the provost of 
Sutton to Sir John de Perham zs. bd., and to Sir Robert Manduth 
\s. \\d., and to Dame Margery de Cantulupo \s. \\d. : sum \os. ^d. 
And so there remains clear of the rent of the said freemen 26^. bd. 

And be it known that all the aforesaid owe due suit at the court of 
the lord. The rent of assize of the villeins of Sutton is worth per 
annum 51 J. 9</. For the capitage of the natives 2j. For the larder 
of the villeins 5^. The fines of land and herjots of the villeins 
are worth per annum los. The reliefs, wards, and marriages per 
annum of the freemen amount to i y. ^d. The pleas of the court 
are worth per annum i os. 

Robert le Hope, Symon Boscor, Henry Culle, John Warde, Ralph 
Cule, and Nicholas le Robber owe per annum 24 hens of chertsete, 
each of them 4 hens, and they are worth 2^. Ralph Rocke, John 
Kule, Hugh Maynard, William ad Portam, and Beatrice Maynard 
owe 5 bushels of wheat of chertsete, each of them one bushel, 
and they are worth per annum is. bd. And the pannage of the 
pigs \\d., for the pig \d. And of the herbage of 7 beasts io\d., 
for each beast \\d. Sum, \id. The advowson of the church of 
the said vill belongs to that manor, and is worth 10 marks. 

Sum -total except the church, £\^ \s. \d. 

Sum-total with the church, £i\ 14J. %d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 48. 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. U. O 

9 



114 Wiltshire 



CumunD^ Catl of CotntDall. 

With the assent of the attorneys of the Queen of Germany 
and the Earl of Cornwall constituted in the presence of 
the King, let it be commanded : 

To the sheriff of Gloucester, that in part of 500 marks worth of 
land which the said Earl granted to the said Queen to have in the 
name of her dower for her life, he shall cause the said Queen to 
have seisin of the manor of Lechelade, which is extended at 
£,q% IS. 6d., with the issues from the Tuesday before the feast of 
St. Katherine, etc. 

To the sheriff of Wilts, [to cause the said Queen to have seisin] 
of the ;^2o which Richard^ son of John, owes of the manor of 
Wyntreslawe and £zo which the Abbot of Malmesbury owes of the 
farm of Malmesbury. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 69. 



Extent made at Melkesham by command of the King before 
Master Walter Scamel, Dean of Salisbury, and Matthew de 
Columbar, hereto assigned, 4 Edward I [1275-6], by the oath of 
Walter de Insula bona, Henry Croc, Roger de Calstun, William de 
Ferestal, Richard Coiele, knights, Laurence de Bosco, Peter Testewode, 
Henry Hereberd, Richard de Comerwelle, Henry de Gatescoerte, William 
Esturdy, William Basset, Walter de Foxhangere, Geoffrey Bochard, 
Gilbert de la Roche, Gilbert de Aula, Peter de Batdeham, William de 
Bienacre, Hugh de Wlvemere, Walter de la rude, Elias de Thingele, 
Roger de Bukkentun, William de Esteworthe, and Richard de Wike, 
who say that 

In the manor of Melkesham there is of the rent of assize of the 
freemen and customars together with the customs and services 
which the customars ought to make per annum £1^1 y. i \d. Also 
of arable land there are in the said manor of good land 178^ acres 
by measured perch, price of the acre iid. Also 92 acres of poor 
land by measured perch, whereof the price of the acre is td. The 
easements of the court with the curtilage are worth per annum 4^. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 1 1 5 

There are there 51! acres of meadow, and the acre is appraised at 
IS. bd. There is there a pasture called Inmerhs, and it is worth per 
annum wos. Also another pasture called Utmerhs wherein certain 
men of the manor have common, and it is worth per annum 30J. 
Also a pasture called Chalnecrofte, and it is worth per annum 28^. 
The pleas and perquisites of the intrinsic hundred .... 
with the fines and heriots are worth per annum £\. And of the 
same hundred of the rent which is called lyefsilver per annum 
28^. Also the pleas and perquisites of the foreign hundred with 
the rent which is called turn .... and tethingpeni are 
worth per annum £if i is. The pannage in the wood is worth per 
annum zos. The tolsester are worth per annum \os. The chirchet 
of the hens is worth per annum los. The capitage of the natives 
is worth per annum i%d. The toll of beasts sold is worth per 
annum \zd. 

Sum of the whole extent, ;^82 \s. M. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I^ No. 102. 



I nqUlSltlOn taken at Merleberge on Wednesday next 
A before the feast of St. Dronisius, 4 Edward I [1276], before 
Guy de Taunton, by command of the King, by the oath of Peter 
Parmentar, Thomas Grammar, Geoffrey Harevast, William Grammar, 
Nicholas Gives, Peter Levenard, John le Cordewarner, Stephen 
Baxman, William Faber, William Gerbod, Henry Gold, and Gilbert 
de Wynierburn, who say that 

That void place in Merleberge which is next to the garden of 
Master Nicholas de Merleberge is of the ancient demesne of the King 
and is in the hand of the King. That place which lies on the 
south part of the said garden is worth per annum 4<f., and contains 
in length 128 feet and in breadth 16 feet. And the same place on 
the east part of the said garden is worth per annum ltd., and 
contains in length 128 feet and in breadth 64 feet. 

If it should please the King to grant the said place to the said 
Master Nicholas or to any other, he may well do this, saving to the 
neighbours and the passers-by a way to their tenements as they 
were wont to have. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 105. 



1 1 6 Wiltshire 



J9tc]^ola05 0on of iSicl^ola^ u l^aberejefl^am* 

Inquisition made by command of the King before the 
Sheriff of Wilts and William de Breyhuf, hereto assigned, 
whether Nicholas, son and heir of Nicholas de Haveresham, lately 
deceased, was in the wardship of the lord the King, father of the 
King that now is, while he was within age, and if Emma, mother of 
the said Nicholas, was dowered by the said King of the lands and 
tenements which were of Nicholas de Haveresham, formerly her 
husband, in Cumpton, or by Nicholas, son of the said Nicholas, by 
the oath of Geoffrey Caff, Robert Co/, Gilbert la Tayllur, Geoffrey 
de Staunton, Walter Pram, Roger Peytevin, John le Bor, John de 
Domerham, Richard Uppehulle, William le Lung, John de' la Hyde, 
and Elias le Clerc, who say that 

Nicholas, son and heir oi Nicholas de Haveresham, was of full age 
when Nicholas his father died, and was never in the wardship of 
King H., and that the said Emma was dowered by the said 
Nicholas her son of the tenements in Cumpton and not by the 
said King. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward I, No. 108. 



iSicl^arn De la iSoi^ele. 

Writ directed to the Sheriff of Wilts and dated at Bamtone 
ist January, 5 Edward I [1277]. 

Edward, by the grace of God, etc. 

Whereas we lately commanded you to restore to John de Fyjhyde 
the custody of certain lands in Lavynton which he had of the gift 
and grant of Richard de la Rokele, deceased, and which you at the 
command of Ralph de Sandwyco, our steward, by reason of the death 
of the said Richard, took into our hand as it is said, to have 
according to the grant aforesaid ; and you declared that you 
would not execute our command unless you received likewise the 
command of the said Ralph, at which we marvel : We now 
command you that without waiting for the mandate of the said 
Ralph you restore that custody to the said John without delay, 
according to the tenure of our first command. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward I, No. 50. 



tnquisitiones Post Mortem. 1 1 7 



iSicl^arti De la iSoftele. 

Writ directed to the SheriflF of Wilts, dated at Cirencester 
28th December, 5 Edward I [1276]. 

Edward, by the grace of God, etc. 

John de Fyfide showed that whereas Richard de Rupella, lately 
deceased, who held of us in chief, gave to the said John the 
wardship of the lands and tenements in Lavinton, which were of 
Emelinede Lascy, formerly Countess of UUon'' (Ulster), which came to 
the hands of the said Richard after the death of the said Emeline 
because she held the same of the said Richard by knight's service, 
and the said John in the lifetime of the said Richard and 
afterwards was in full seisin of the said custody— you lately took 
the said custody into our hands and detain it unjustly from the 
said John, to his no small damage : if this is so, we command 
you to restore the said custody to him without delay: to hold 
according to the gift of the said Richard. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward I, No. 50. 



iRicI^arD De la iRofeele* 

Inquisition made at Foxle on the day of SS. Fabian and 
Sebastian, 5 Edward I [1277], by Gilbert de Aula, Nicholas de 
Cruk, William Gole, Richard le Blund, Adam 'Carpentar, John de 
Wodebrigge, Richard de Wyke, Richard Dunelye, John de Slokes, 
William Frankelayn, Bartholomew de Hechelhamton, William Bacheler, 
and Richard Ennok, concerning the lands and tenements which 
were of Richard de la Rokele in Stupelavinton of the seisin and 
gift which he made to John de Fifide, they say that 

Brunig, the said John's man, came to Stapellavinton on Friday 
before the day of St. Lucy the Virgin, 5 Edward I [1276], and 
took seisin of the said lands in the name of his lord by Humphrey, 
bailiff of the said Richard de la Rokele, and by letters patent of the 
said Richard, and took fealty of the villeins and nothing of the free 
tenants, and the villeins pledged him 4^. and held seisin until the 
morrow of St. Thomas the Apostle next following, and then came 
the sheriff and seised the said land into the hand of the King. 
9 • Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward I, No. 50. 



1 1 8 Wiltshire 



(KLlaltem0 De mxXtm. 

Writ directed to Salomon de Roff' and Thomas de Sudynton, an 
dated at Westminster 28th April, 5 Edward I [1277]. 

Edward, by the grace of God, etc. 

On behalf of Walter de Wylion, who holds a certain mill unde 
our Castle of Sarum next our mill there in fee farm of the Prio 
and Convent of St. Dennis without Southampton, it is shown tc 
us that whereas the said Prior and Convent had the said mill ol 
the gift of Patrick, sometime Earl of Sarum, then true lord and 
possessor of those mills, in this form, that they and their successors 
for ever should have only the multure of malt of all the men of the 
vills thereabouts adjacent to that mill. And the said Earl reserved 
the multure of all other corn of all the men of those vills at his 
other mill, and the said Prior and Convent from the time of the 
said gift and before that the remaining mill came to the hands 
of our predecessors had the multure of the said malt in the form 
aforesaid, and likewise the said Walter from the time when he was 
enfeoffed until Walter de Sturhcheslegh, late sheriff of our said 
county, to whom we committed the custody of our Castle of Sarum 
together with our said mill, caused as well the multure of such 
malt as of other corn of the men of the said vills to be brought to 
our said mill : Hyldehrand de London, now sheriff of the said county, 
by reason of the bringing thereof made by the said Walter de 
Sturhcheleg, does not permit the said Walter de Wylton to have such 
multure as he ought to have, and which he and the said Prior and 
Convent in times past were wont to have, to the no small damage 
of the said Walter: Now we, willing to be certified as to the 
premises and that full justice may be done to the said Walter, 
assign you to be our justices to enquire into the truth of the 

premises. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.^ 5 Edward I, No. 63. 



malterujs tie muton* 

Verdict of the 24 jurors, viz., John de Pereham, John de 
Monemtie, John de Cheverel, John de Tynhyde, John de 
Kormaylles, Robert de LusteshuUe, William de Forestel, knights, John 
de la Forde, Henry de Mundene, William Aujrey, William Glendy, 
Alan de Langejord, Robert Scyreman, William Weliband, Edmund 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. i 1 9 

Falke, Bartholomew Au/rey, Saveric de Bunerione, Peter Cray, Hamo 
de la Mare, Geoffrey Warin, Roger Swoting, Richard de Stapelford, 
William Malewan, Henry de Montsorel, and Geoffrey de Chaucumbe, 
who say that 

To the mill under the Castle of Old Sarum which Walter de 
Wilton holds of the Prior and Convent of St. Dennis beyond 
Southampton, at fee farm, belongs and was wont to belong the 
multure of the malt of the men of Old Sarum, so that he shall find 
to them carriage at his own costs, and shall take of each brewing 
one barrel of ale for the carriage ; and of all the men of the other 
vills thereabouts adjacent who freely and of good will wished to 
come to the said mill, and not otherwise. And because the said 
Walter de Wilton made there a fulling mill joined to his said mill 
for malt in the same course where in times past neither he nor his 
predecessors were wont to have there any such mill but only for 
malt, to the damage of the mill and fishery of the lord the King : 
Walter de Sterkeslye, then sheriff of Wilts and keeper of the castle of 
Sarum and the said mill, not permitting this to be done, caused the 
multure of the said malt to be brought to the King's mill. 

Chan, Inq. p.m., 5 Edward I, No. 63. 



Writ dated at Wodestoke Z4th June, 5 Edward I [1277]- 

Inquisition made before the Sheriff of Wilts by John le 
Knyth, Simon le Franceys, Geoffrey Cof, Robert Peyteuyn, 
Gilbert le Taillur, Geoffrey de Stanton, Robert Geraud, Roger de Aula, 
William Bartelot, Walter le Erie, Edmund le Jouge, and James Lucy, 
who say that 

In the 26th year of King Henry, son of King John, it was agreed 
between Nicholas de Haversham, senior, and Geofftey Daniel de 
Winterburne that the said Geoffrey should demise and to farm let to 
the said Nicholas and his heirs 3 virgates of land in Winterburne, 
Hugemanton, and Burton for the term of 10 years, so that the said 
Nicholas and his heirs shall hold them of the chief lords of the 
fee and shall do to them all the services belonging to the said 
3 virgates, and that at the end of the said term the said Geoffrey 
or his heirs shall pay to the said Nicholas or his heirs 50 marks of 
silver, and if they shall not do this the said Nicholas shall hold the 
said 3 virgates until they have been paid the said amount. 



1 20 Wiltshire 

By fhis demise the said Nicholas held the said land for his whole 
life, and after his death Nicholas de Haversham, son and heir of the 
said Nicholas, held the same, and dowered his mother, Emma, 
therewith. After the death of the said Emma the said Nicholas 
again entered the same, and held it as long as he lived. He held 
2 virgates of the fee of Joan de Bohun by the service of td., and 
doing suit at the court of the said Joan every 3 weeks, and that 
service is worth per annum is. ; and those 2 virgates beyond the 
service to the chief lady are worth 37^. bd. He held the third 
virgate of the fee of Henry de Bovile, paying therefor yearly \os. 
for all services saving royalties, and that virgate is worth beyond 
the service due to the lord of the fee 4^. The said 3 virgates of 
land were never taken by the escheator into the hand of the King, 
but all the lands which the said Nicholas had in the vill of 
Cumpton were taken into the King's hand by the sub-escheator. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward I, No. 66. 



InC[UlSltlOn made of the lands and tenements which were 
of Henry Daubeny, on Friday next after the Assumption of 
the Blessed Mary the Virgin, 6 Edward I [1278], by the oath of 
John de Merdejie, Gilbert Giffard, Richard Pettuin, Edmund Falke, 
John le Hoy, Geoffrey Warin, Saveric de Bianerton, Herbert de 
Chilhamtofi, Edmund Fillol, John de Wyh, Robert Sireman, Richard 
Semberd, John Richer, Edmund Cler, Richard de Bernirs, Richard de 
Slawolle, Richard le Eyr, Alan de Langejord, and John Claris, who 
say that 

The said Henry held no tenement of the King in chief on the 
day that he died, but he held the manor of Wicford of Sir Pagan 
de Chawrcis, and it is worth per annum £2^ by the service of half 
a knight's fee. The said Henry held one half-virgate of land of 
Bartholomew de Wicjord in the said vill, paying \s. per annum, and 
it is worth half a mark. The said Henry held one carucate of land 
in Berewik of Sir Patrick de Chawrcis, paying by the year one 
mark, and it is worth per annum loos. ; also 2 virgates of land in 
Orcheston St. George oi Edith {'^), daughter q{ John Cook, paying 
therefor by the year one rose, and they are worth per annum 
20J. ; also one virgate and 5 acres of land of Gilbert Giffard in 
Madinton, paying by the year id. and one pair of gloves, and they 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. i2i 

are worth one mark ; also 2 virgates of land in Wodebore of Adam 
de la Rivire, paying i lb. of pepper by the year, and they are worth 
20J. ; also one virgate of land of Richard Gole in the same vill, 
paying id., and it is worth 10s. He also held of the same Adam 
one half-virgate of land, paying 6^., and it is worth half a mark. 

Clarice, sister of the said Henry, and Maurice de Bonham, who 
was the son of the son of Juliana de Albiniaco, sister of the said 
Clarice, are the heirs of the said Henry : the said Clarice is aged 
36 years and the said Maurice 25 years at the least. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward I, No. 27. 



Writ dated at Oxford 21st December, 6 Edward I [1277]. 

Tills is the extent of the lands and tenements which were of 
Adam de Mockesham, made by the oath of 12 jurors of the 
hundred of Bradeford, viz., William de Atteworthe, John de Combre- 
well, William Basset, John de Mogworllegh, Walter de Buddebur' , 
Gervase de Buddebur', Stephen de la Slade, Robert de Lintenesjord, 
Gilbert de Wyke, William de Puteo, Hugh le Gerisse, and Elias le 
Frye, who say that 

There are at Mockesham in the demesne of the land which was 
of the said Adam 62 acres of arable land, price of each acre 5</. ; 
5 acres of meadow, price of each acre 10^. ; 2 parts of one acre of 
pasture of the price of %d. per annum ; 5* acres of wood which are 
worth per annum ibd. The curtilage and garden are worth per 
annum \bd. As to rents, services, villeinage, and other issues 
belonging to the land which was of the said Adam, they know 
nothing. 

Sum of the value of the said tenements by the year, 33J. \d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward I, No. 34. 



anam la l&nolle* 

Writ dated 8th November, 6 Edward I [1278]. 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Claryndon before Master W. Scamel, 

X. Dean of Sarum, and R. de Sandwyco, steward of the lord the 

King, on Monday next after the feast of St. Scolastica the Virgin, 



1 2 2 Wiltshire 

8 Edward I [1280], by the oath of Alan de Langeford, Edmund 
Folke, John Chamberleing, Richard de Slapel/ord, Wan'n de Wycheford, 
Richard of the same, Herbert de Childhamton, Saveric de Bymmerton, 
Henry Dun, Martin le Cumener, Hamo Lysewys, Walter Louel^ Robert 
Isinbert, John de Babynton, and James de Stapeljord, who say that 

Adam de la Cnolle and Emma, his wife, sister and heir of Master 
Adam de Tyleneye, are bound to Robert Walerand in 40^. yearly at 
Fisshelton in co. Wilts, to be paid for the life of the said Robert 
only, because the said Robert by his charter granted to Master 
Adam de Tyleneye, whose heir the said Emma is, one messuage and 
a certain perch of land and meadow in Fisshelton, he paying to 
the said Robert \os. by the year ; and that immediately after the 
death of the said Robert the said Adam de Tyleneye and his heirs 
will be quit of the payment of the said 40J. for ever. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward I, A^o. 86. 



abbej50 De iRome^e^. 

Inquisition made at Troubrigge before Roger de Clifford 
in the forest of Selewode in co. Wilts, by foresters, verderers, 
and others, viz., Walter Morice, Robert le Forester, Robert le Warinner, 
Adam le Forester, and John Bray, foresters, Eustace de Hulk, John de 
Aungers, and Lawrence de Bosco, verderers, William Molendinarius, 
Peter Testewod, Thomas le Theyn, Robert de Burtone, Hugh Beauseruise, 
Simon Horkedale, William Blaunchard, Walter de Aune, Robert Juwet, 
Richard Forestar , William Simon, Robert de Honebrigge, John le Leche, 
John de Brokoure, and Roger le Paumer, as to what sum and in what 
places the Abbess and nuns of Romesey, by the licence of the King 
for the relief of their house and the acquittance of their debt, they 
may sell wood and underwood in the said forest, to the least 
damage and hurt of the said forest. They all say that 

The said Abbess and nuns have the woods of Haywode, Kayred, 
;ind Slograve in the said forest, and are in the regard in the which 
they may sell of wood and underwood to the sum of 20 marks, and 
there is there large cover and no access of beasts except occasionally 
by accident. They have also in the said forest the woods of 
Brokoure and Coningehay, and are outside the regard in the which 
they may sell high wood to the sum of looj., without any damage 
or hurt of the King's forest. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward /, No. 89. 



tnquisitiones Post Mortem. 123 

iRobert ^^parD* 

Writ dated 28th October, 7 Edward I [1278]. 

InCJUlSltlOn made at Claryndon before Ralph de Sandwyco 
on Monday next after the feast of St. Scolastica the Virgin, 
8 Edward I [1280], by the oath of Richard de Cumbe, Simon de 
Lillecote, John de Escote, William Maleivejn, John le Frankelein, 
William son oiDionisius, John Mandeward, John de Andoure, Richard 
son of John, John Beamund, Peter de la Hulk, Stephen de Brigh- 
merston, John le Saucer, Bartholomew de Cumktone, and Simon le Frye, 
who say that 

Robert Pypard held nothing of the King in chief on the day that 
he died, but King Henry, father of King Edward, gave to Adam 
Cok 10 librates of land in Flytelton : to hold to him and his heirs, 
paying therefor to the King at Claryndone bd. of rent : and the 
said Adam had an heir Agnes by name, who married Robert Pypard, 
and afterwards the said Robert died without heir of his body. 
Afterwards King Henry granted to Henry de Candeure the marriage 
of the said Agnes, whom the said Henry married, and afterwards 
the said Agnes died without heir of her body; and then King 
Edward granted to the said Henry de Candeure the said 10 librates 
of land as his escheat for his life : and now the said librates of 
land are in the hand of the King as his escheats, and in the custody 
of the sheriff of Wilts. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 3. 



©enr^ De penebrigge* 

InOUlSltlOn made at the Castle of Sarurn on Thursday in 
the Feast of the Holy Innocents, 8 Edward I [1279], before 
Hildebrand de London, sheriff of Wilts, by the oath of Stephen de 
Bristmerslon, Simon de Litlecofe, John Le Saucer, Richard Petit, 
Richard le Heyr, John Le Lung, Roger Heldeman, Thomas Frankeleyn, 
Bartholomew de Compion, John le Irreys, Adam Dionisius, Richard 
son oi John, and Peter Hiippehull, who say that 

Henry de Pt:nnebrigge did not hold the manor of Tudeworth in 
CO. Wilts of the King in chief on the day that he died, but Roger la 
Suche, who held that manor of John Bisef, gave it to Gilbert de 



t24 Wiltshire 

Sanfurd with Lora^ his daughter, in free marriage, and the said 
Gilbert being dead, the said Lora gave the said manor to Arrahilia, 
who was the wife of the said Henry de Pennebrigge, and to Fulk, son 
of the said Henry and Arrabilia, by the service of id. by the year. 

The jurors do not know whether the said Henry de Pennebrigge 
held the other manors named in the writ [missing] of the King in 
chief or of others. 

The manor of Tudeworth is now in the hand of the King. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 12. 



InCJUlSltlOn made at the Castle of Sarum on Friday next 
after the Feast of the Invention of Holy Cross, 7 Edward I 
[1279], before Hildebrand de London, sheriff of Wilts, as to how 
much land Henry de Penbrigge held on the day that he died of the 
King in chief and how much of others, etc., by John le Vrussche, 
Richard le Eyr, Richard le Forester, Simon le Frye, Richard Petit, 
Walter Kytewyne, William le Noble, William Elys, Thomas Colle, 
John le Hay ward, Peter le Blake, and Alexander Denys, who say that 

The said Henry did not hold anything of the King in chief in co. 
Wilts, but he held oi Lora de Saunford aX Northtudeworth 4 virgates 
of land in demesne which are worth £'^ by the year, with pasture 
for 2 horses, 6 oxen, and 250 sheep. 

There are there 9 virgates of land in villeinage, which are worth 
per annum, clear, 9 marks. 

Fulk de Penbrigge, son of the said Henry, is his next heir, but they 
do not know his age because he does not live in co. Wilts, nor has 
he ever lived there. 

Chan. Lnq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 12. 



)^aganui9! De CaDurci^. 

InC[UlSltlOn made by the oath of William Spyleman, Henry 
Sturmy, Richard Sturmy, etc., etc., as to how much land 
Paganus de Cadurcis held of the King in chief in co. Southampton 
on the day that he died, and how much of others, who say that 

He held the manor of Kyngesumburn and Langestoke of the 
King in chief and nothing of others in the said county, and he 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 125 

held the said manors together with 2 manors which he held in co. 
Wilts, viz. Marthone and Burbach, for 2 knight's fees. 

Patricius de Cadurcis, brother of the said Paganus, is his next 
heir, and is aged 25 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 17; 



Writ dated 27th April, 7 Edward I [1279]. 

Extent made before Sir H. .de London, sheriff of Wilts, on 
Wednesday in the vigil of the Ascension of our Lord 
[no year given], of the lands and tenements of Sir Walter Giffard, 
Archbishop of York, of his manor of Boyton, by the oath of 
William de Wiieklive, Hugh Coquun, John de Babinton, John de 
Dopeford, William Luddok, John Strug, Robert Thurstayn, Adam 
Brunman, William Pistor, Robert Vigerus, Adam de Dopeford, Robert 
le Aule{?), who say that 

The manor of Boyton is held for one fee of Sir /ohn Giffard, and 
is worth in lands, rents, meadows, feedings, etc., £'>,o of silver. 

The said Sir Walter Giffard held nothing of the King in chief in 
CO. Wilts. 

Sir Godfrey Giffai'd, Bishop of Worcester, is the next heir of the 
said Sir Walter, and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 22. 



gjol^n le iBretun. 

^r • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made of the lands which were of John le 

A. Bretun, by the oath of William de Okeburn, Nicholas de Insula, 

Thomas le Byeys, Robert de la Wyke, John de Chylton, Adam de 

Colecote, Robert Styne, John Elys, Philip de Molendino, John de la 

Rochele, William Ekeroyd, and John Styne, who say that 

The said John held on the day that he died one messuage and 
6 bovates of land in Nethercote, in the hundred of Blakegrave, in 
CO. Wilts, but he held nothing of the King in chief there or else- 
where in the said county, but he held those tenements of Roger 
Bygot, Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England, by reason of 
Alyne, his wife, daughter and heir of Philip Basset, by the service 
of the fourth part of a knight's fee and id. of yearly rent in chief, 
and they are worth per annum, clear, tos. 



126 Wiltshire 

John le Bretun^ son of the said Johtiy is his next heir, and is aged 
2 1 years and more. 

The said John paid out of the said tenements to the said Roger le 
Bygot by reason of his said wife one mark yearly, and the said 
Roger paid thereof to Robert le Grey, lord of Coges, loj., and the 
said Robert answers thereof to the heirs of Manser Arjyl, and 
the same heirs pay the said mark for the said tenements towards 
the guard of Dover. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward /, No. 30. 



Edward, by the grace of God King of England, etc., to Ralph de 
Sandwico, his steward. Because we understand by inquisition 
which we caused to be made by you that Matthew Turpin, 
deceased, who held of us in chief, enfeoffed Matthew Turpin, his 
son, and Matilda, his wife, of 100 solidates of land in Estwinterslawe : 
to hold to them and the heirs of their bodies : which said lands by 
reason of the death of the said Matthew son of Matthew are taken 
into our hand : We, at the request of Stephen de Brigthmerston and 
the said Matilda his daughter, command you to deliver up the said 
land to the said Stephen and Matilda, to be tilled and sown up to 
our next Parliament, together with the issues thereof, from the 
time of the taking of that land into our hand, taking from them 
sufficient security for those issues then to be restored to us if we 
wish to have them. 

Dated at Wodestoke 7th February, 7 Edward I [1279]- 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 36. 



i^attl^etD Curpm. 

InQUlSltlOn made at the Castle of Sarum on Sunday next 
before the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 7 Edward I 
[1279], before Hildebrand de London, sheriff of Wilts, by the oath 
oi John Aucher, John le Saucer, William de Put ton, Jordan de Laverke- 
stoke, Walter Lovel, Walter Kytewyne, Philip de Nyweton, Geoffrey le 
Erie of Bultiford, Adam Denys, Ervisius de Durinton, Adam le 
Frankelayn, and Ralph de Bereghton, whether Matthew Turpin 
enfeoffed Matthew, his son, and Matilda, who was the wife of the 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 127 

said Matthew^ of 100 solidates of land, and whether King Henry, 
father of the now King, or the now King, had the relief thereof or 
not, who say that 

Matthew Turpin, who held of the King in chief, enfeoffed Matthew 
his son and Matilda who was the wife of the said Matthew his son, 
jointly, of 100 solidates of land in Est Winterslawe in the time of 
King Henry, father of the now King : to have to them and the 
heirs of their bodies, but neither the said King Henry, nor the 
now King, have ever had the relief thereof. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 36. 



iHatt1)ett) CutpiiT* 

II\C[UlSltlOn made at Estwynterslewe on Sunday in the 
Octaves of Easter, 7 Edward I [1279}, before Hildehrand de 
London, sheriff of Wilts, of the value of the wardship of the land of 
Matthew Turpyn, deceased, and Matilda, his wife, in Estwynterslewe 
by the year, together with the marriage of their heir, by John le 
Saucer, Jordan de Lauerkestoke, Walter Lovel, Thomas Chalkere, Adam 
Frankelayn, Stephen de Ewyas, Nicholas de Watelye, Richard Petit, 
William le Noble, Thomas Hardy, Hugh le Frie, and William Swening, 
who say that 

The garden with the easement of the court is worth by the year 
lbs., and the dovecote 4^'. 

There are there in the demesne 200 acres, and the acre is worth 
^d. There is there pasture for 400 sheep, which is worth per 
annum \bs. Sd., viz. ^d. per head. Also of rent of assize by the 
year 43 j. 1 i^d. The works of the customars are worth per annum 
43J. ii^d. The rent of hens is worth per annum 4^'. ^d. Also 
there is there pasture for 16 beasts which is worth per annum 
$s. \d. The pannage of the pigs is worth per annum 2s. The 
profit of the wood scarcely suffices to support the house, the fuel, 
and the hedges of the court. Of pleas and perquisites by the 
year 5i-. 

Sum, ;^io "js. lid. 

The marriage of the heir of the said Matthew and Matilda is 
worth looj., and is not worth more to be sold because the said 
Matilda is enfeoffed jointly with the said Matthew her husband, 
deceased, and therefore the marriage of the heir with the wardship 
of the said land is of less value. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward I, No. 36. 



128 Wiltshire 



Extent made on the day of St. Margaret the Virgin, 
7 Edward I [1279], of all the lands and tenements o{ John 
de Hanekynton in co. Wilts, to wit, how much they are worth per 
annum, clear, etc., by the oath of John le Breth, Jordan de Aqua of 
Somerford, William Baillemund^ Thomas Scolace, Richard de la Lee, 
Pagan de Brokineherg, John de Wincestre, Walter de Ba, Roger de la 
Lupe, Walter de Thechingedon, Robert de Calston, Thomas de Vrdlye, 
who say that 

John de Hanekynton had in demesne of arable land 116 acres, 
each acre whereof is worth by the year 6d. : sum 58^. He had 
also one free man who pays by the year ^s. Also 15 acres of 
meadow, price of the acre by the year zs. bd. : sum 37J. td. He 
has also 5 villeins, each of whom holds 12 acres of land and pays 
by the year zs. of rent : sum i os. And each of them shall work 
for 2 days in the week by the year, and the work of each of them 
is worth 4J. by the year: sum los. Also each of them pays for 
cherechsectum 5 hens, price of the hen $d. : sum zs. id. He 
had a garden, and it is worth as in fruits and herbage 5^. The 
easement of the court as in houses, herbage, and curtilage, 6s. Sd. 
Sum of the sums in the whole, ^y ^s. $d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward /, No. 65. 



da^eofire^ tie CcIJell^ampton* 

Inquisition made by Ralph de Sandwyco i8th June, 
8 Edward I [1280], of the lands and tenements of Geoffrey le 
Blund [sic'], by the oath of Robert le Heyr, Bartholomew de Echel- 
hampton, Walter Maleweyn, Robert de Wyke, William Morin, William 
Edmund, John Beyuin, Philip de Caning, John de Escote, Richard de 
Codejord, Richard Bruton, Michael le Esperuir, who say that 

Geoffrey de Echelmeton on the day that he died held no land of 
the King in chief, but he held in the vill of Echelhampton one 
carucate of land of Sir Ralph de Wyleton in chief by knight's service 
for half a fee, and it is worth per annum £'] 10s. The said Geoffrey 
was wont to pay to the castle of Devisis for the said Ralph de 
Wyleton los. in the time of peace for the ward of the said castle, 
and in the time of war he found one servant for 40 days at the said 



Inquisittones Post Mortem. 129 

castle for the said Ralph for the said land of Echelhampton. He 
held in the said vill of William Maleweyn \\ virgates of land, 
paying by the year 4*^^. to the said William, and it is worth per 
annum 15J. ; also in the said vill of the fee of Roger Bussel one 
virgate of land, paying to the said Roger by the year ^d., and it is 
worth per annum 15^.; also in the said vill of Roger Luvel one 
cottage and one croft, paying to the same by the year zs., and it is 
worth per annum 3^. The said Geoffrey held of the Bishop of 
Sarum in the manor of Potema^ half a knight's fee and 2 virgates 
of land by knight's service, and it is worth per annum, clear, 
£<i \zs. 

Richard^ son of the said Geoffrey, is his next heir, and is aged 
8 years, and is entering his gth year. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward /, No. 8. 



iSalp]^ De iHauntietilL 

InqUlSltipn made at Sarum on Thursday next after the 
feast of St. Dunstan, 8 Edward I [1280], by Nicholas de 
Hauekrig, Walter de Deone, John Longun, John de B ration, Thomas 
de Bratton, Thomas Longun, Thomas de Novi, John Coco, Richard 
Gonter, Hubert de Gardino, Adam Warin, and Nicholas Cauel, who 
say that 

Ralph de Maundevil held 20'librates of land of the King in chief 
in Worth and Bratton, paying therefor yearly to the King zos. at 
the castle at Devisis in the time of peace, and in*the time of war he 
shall find one horseman and himself armed in the same castle, and 
shall pay nothing that year of rent. He held nothing of others. 
Thomas de Maundtvill is his next heir, and is aged 28 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 -Edivard /, No. 17. 



"W" • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn made at Wylton on Sunday next after the feast 

X of the Apostles Peter and Paul, 8 Edward I [1280], before 

Hildehrand de London, sheriff of Wilts, of the lands and tenements 

formerly o^ John de Nevile, by the oath of Walter Huskarl, Thomas 

de Chartres, John de Lye, John son of William, Walter le Constable^ 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. II. 9 

1 



130 Wiltshire 

Peter de le Eschalere, William Attepyrye, Richard de Mora, John 
Atlewode, Richard de Molendin\ Robert de Aldreston, and William atte 
Hereweye, who say that 

John de Nevile on the day that he died held nothing of the King 
in chief in co. Wilts, but he held in the said county [no place 
given] of Roger le Engleys \\ carucates of land, and they are 
worth per annum, clear, £t, by the service of \s. by the year. 

The said John held of Robert, son of Thomas de Dumberdan, 
5 acres of land [no place given] by the service of 5^. by the year, 
and they are worth 5J. by the year. 

William de Nevile, son of the said John, is his next heir, aTid is of 
full age, viz. 21 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edtvard I, 'No. 19. 



EegtnalD De ^at>ele^» 

T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Clarendone before Hildehrand de 
A London, sheriff of Wilts, on Friday next before the feast of 
St. Peter in Cathedra, 8 Edward I [1280], by the oath of Nicholas 
de Aune, Robert Plukenet, William le Manner, William Colsweyn, 
Robert le Nit, Roger Marmyon, William Gruynin, William He dyman, 
Arnold de Hewode, Thomas le Lung, Robert de Hunebrigge, and Saveric 
de Penleghe, of the lands which Reginald de Pavely held of the King 
in chief on the day that he died, and how much of others, etc., 
etc., who say that 

The said Reginald held of the King in chief 7 carucates of land, 
together with the hundred of Westbury, which are worth per 
annum, clear, £\<:>, by the service of one knight in the King's 
army at his own proper costs for 40 days. He held of Jocelin de 
Plukenet one. carucate of land, which is worth per annum, clear, ;^io. 
Walter de Pavely, son of the said Reginald, is his next heir, and 
is aged 3 1 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward I, No. 24. 



€l)e ^litie^^ of iRome^e^* 

Inquisition made at Wylton before Roger de Clifford and 
his fellows, justices in eyre for the pleas of the forest in 
CO. Wilts, on Thursday next after the feast of the Apostles Peter and 
Paul, 8 Edward I [1280J, by the foresters, verderers, regarders of 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 131 

the forest of Selewode, and by others, knights and lawful men, viz., 
34 of the said county, viz., Robert le Warre, chief forester, and 
Eustace de Hulk and John Daungers, verderers of the said forest, 
and by Peter de Baldeham and Richard Horn, verderers of the 
.forests of Melkesham and Chyppeham, and by Walter de Insula 
bona, Robert Vernon, John de Wotton, John de Grymstedede, Thomas le 
Rus, John de Haverynges, and William de Greyngvyle, knights, 
William de Whyteclyve, Richard Pyg, Robert Dreweys, Roger de Cumbe, 
John de Mereghedene, Walter de Pavely, David Duraunt, John de 
Holeweye, Walter de Doene, William Groygny, Roger le Gras, John de 
Babyntone, Alan de Langeford, Hugh de Wyly, Robert Plugenet of 
Hauekerugge, Geoffrey de Brae tone, John de More, Nicholas de 
Hauikerugg, Nicholas de Aune, Saveric de Penleyghe, and William 
Colsweyn, whether the woods of the Abbess of Romesey of 
Ahstone [Ashtone in writ] and Edyndone of co. Wilts have from 
time immemorial been without the regard and metes of the King's 
forest, and whether Robert Passelewe, formerly justice of the forest, 
afforested those woods at his will, to the damage and hurt of the 
said Abbess, who say that 

The said woods of Ahstone and Edyndone were without the 
regard and metes of the forest of Selewode in co. Wilts up to the 
time of Alaft de Nevyle, then justice of the forest, who afforested 
those woods at his will ; afterwards by a certain perambulation 
made by command of the King before the lord R., then Bishop 
of Salisbury, J. Bishop of Bath and Wells, W. Earl of Sarum, 
William Brinrdoere, and William de Nevile, the said woods were 
disafforested, and so they remained for a long time, up to the time 
of Robert de Passelewe, then justice of the forest, who going through 
that country afforested those woods at his will. 

Chan. Inq. pjn., 8 Ediuard I, No. 46. 



InOUlSltlOn made at IMarleberg on IMonday next after 
the feast of St. Hilary, 8 Edward I [1280], o^ the lands and 
tenements which were of Picotus de Flexborghe, withiji the manor of 
IMarleberg, by the oath of William de Okeburn, William Cardenil, 
Thomas Jop, Nicholas de Polton, William Dalbur, Adam Lotewith, 
John de Evesbur' , Thomas Sterre, William de Evesbur', William de 
Bosco, Simon Chasur, and John de Bosco, who say that 



132 Wiltshire 

The said Picotus de Flexborghe had in the demesne within the 
manor of Marleberg at Flexborgh one messuage and 32 acres of 
land, arable in the whole, which are worth per annum, clear, its. 

He had nothing in villeinage or rents. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward I, No. 61. 



Robert TButDun- 

Extent made on the day of St. Edmund the King, 
8 Edward I [1280], before Hildebrond London, sheriff of 
Wilts, hy John Self, John Walewayn, Hugh Herdyng, William Cole, 
Amald Grocy, William Scyward, John Chereburg, Robert Ede, John 
Clerion, Robert de Burtun, Walter de Eyndune, Peter de Prato, Roger 
de Fonte, William le Paumer, William Sturdy, and John le Fronkelayn^ 
who say that 

Robert Burdun held nothing in co. Wilts of the King in chief, 
but he held 2 carucates of land in the vill of Paulesholter in chief 
-of the seigniorages (lordships) of Rynle, by the service of one 
knight's fee, whereof there belongs to the said carucates 240 acres 
of arable land, whereof each acre is worth per se i\.^d. by the year, 
sum £i^ los. ; and 24 acres of meadow, whereof each acre is worth 
by the year 2s., sum 48i-. All the pasture of the said tenements is 
worth per annum ^is. \d. The garden with the curtilage is worth 
per annum 65-. 8</. The pasture of the park is worth 4^. by the 
year, and a certain mill is worth by the year los. The rent of the 
free tenants is worth per annum $y. and ^ lb. of pepper. The rent 
of the villeins with the customs and all other services is worth per 
annum £'i I'js. ohd. 

Nicholas, son of the said Robert Burdun, is his next heir, and 
will be 40 years old on the day of St. Nicholas, 9 Edward I [1280]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward I, No. 88. 



^Itna la ^e^pen^er. 

Extent of the manor of Berewyk, in co. Wilts, which was of 
Alyna Countess Marshall, before Ralph de Safidivyco, made 
on the day of the Commemoration of St. Paul, 9 Edward I [1281], 
by William de la Mare, Thomas Martin, John de Busco, Philip de 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 133 

Berewyk, William son of Simon, Richard Thebaud, Humphrey son of 
Richard, Roger de Winierburn, Adam le Newe, John Faber, Peter de la 
Hull, Adam Seman, and Walter Molendinar\ who say that 

The easements of the court and houses of the said manor and 
the curtilage are worth per annum i zd. There are there of arable 
land 250 acres, price of each acre bd. ; also of worn meadow 
reapable 8 acres, price of each acre izd. There is there pasture 
for 56 oxen by the year, and the pasture of each is worth bd. 
There is there pasture for 250 sheep, price of each \d. There is 
there of the rent of free men at the feast of St. Michael i6j. 10^., 
and at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle 15J. id., at the feast of 
the Annunciation 15J. id., and at the feast of the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist 15^. id. Also of the rent of villeins by the 
year at the 4 terms of the year, 34^. There are there 24 hens of 
cherchetum, price of each hen \d. There are there of cherchetum 
2 quarters of wheat, price of the quarter is. Also of the pannage 
of villeins there by the year, bd. There is there the carriage of the 
corn and hay, which is worth per annum \s. Also ploughing there 
by the year of custom, which is worth per annum ltd. Also the 
pleas and perquisites of the court, heriots, reliefs, and fines of 
lands there by the year are worth 8j. 

The said manor is held of the King in chief, paying by the year 
one sparrow-hawk at the feast of St. Michael's. 

Sum of the whole extent aforesaid, £\\ \os. 6d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward I, No. 9. 



auna la J^e^penjaier* 

Extent of the manor of Wynterburn Basset, in co. Wilts, 
which was of Alina Countess Marshall, before Ralph de 
Sandwyco, made on the day of the Commemoration of St. Paul, 
•9 Edward I [1281], by the same jurors, who say that 

The easements of the court and houses, the fruit of the garden, 
and the curtilage there are worth per annum 4^. There are there of 
arable land 260 acres, and each acre is worth by the year bd. ; also 
of worn meadow 8 acres, and each acre is worth by the year i zd. 
There is there pasture for 72 oxen, and the pasture of each ox is 
worth by the year bd. ; also pasture for 300 sheep, price of the 
pasture of each \d. There is there a certain windmill which is worth 
by the year 12^. The dovecote of the same manor is worth by the 
1 • 



134 



Wiltshu'e 



year zs. There are there of the rent of free men at the feast of 
St. Michael 6j. td. ; also of rent of villeins there by the year at the 
4. terms of the year, 46^. There are there by the year 40 hens of 
cherchetum, price of each he'i> \d. There are there of cherchetum 
by the year 5 quarters of wheat, price of the quarter 3^. The 
pannage of the pigs there is worth by the year 6t/. The pleas and 
perquisites of the court, heriots, reliefs, and fines of land are worth 
per annum ds. %d. There is there the fourth part of a knight's fee 
which William de Wudeston holds of the said manor, and it is worth 
per annum 40X., and is extended ts. 

Sum of the whole of this extent ^14 3^. bd., out of which there 
is owing to the Castle of Maryborough by the year 20^., and so- 
the sum is clear £1-^ y. td. 

Chan. Inq. p,m.y 9 Edward I, No. 9. 



aiina la ©ejspenjser* 

Extent of the manor of La Fasterne which was of Alina 
Countess Marshall, made on Tuesday next after the feast of 
the Apostles Peter and Paul, 9 Edward I [1281], by Philip de 
3folindin\ John le Chapman, John le Frankeleyn, William le 
Frankelein, Waller Selyet, John Russel, Adam Frankeleyn, William 
Edmund, Robert Marescall, William de Appelby, John Curteys, and 
John Marescallo, who say that 

The court and the easements of the houses, fruit of the gardens 
and the herbage, and the curtilage of the said manor and of the old 
court which is member of the same are worth per annum 10s. 
There are there of arable land 616 acres, which are worth by the 
year ;^io 5^. 4^., price of the acre ^d. There is there pasture for 
85 beasts, price of the pasture of each bd. Also pasture in 3 parks, 
saving the support of the wild animals, for 80 beasts, price of the 
pasture of each td. There are there of meadow 173 acres, of 
25 acres of which the price per acre is 2s., and of 120 acres the 
price of each acre is izd., and 28 acres of worn meadow, price of 
the acre 8(/. The pannage of the said manor is worth per annum 
24J. There is there of rent of free men of the manor of 
Wotton, which is of the members of the same manor, at 2 terms 
of the year, viz., at Michaelmas and Lady Day, £(i 4^. id. Also 
of fee farm by the year at Wotton, 13^-. 4fd., at the said 2 terms. 
Also of the rent of Lytlecote by the year, los. id., at the same 



hiquisitiones Post Mortem. 135 

terms. Also of the rent of villeins and cottars at Fasterne and the 
old court, £\o \is. 6d. Also of John de Tr . . . who holds half 
a fee and the fourth part of a knight's fee, tos. by the year at the 
said terms, and holds of Swyndon, which is a member of the said 
manor. The said John pays by the year there 1 3^. 4^., viz. at the 
feast of St. Aldelmus. Peter Bluet holds half a knight's fee of the 
same member by the year, paying only scutage when it shall 
happen. There are there by the year 2 lbs. of pepper of rent, and 
they are worth i zd. There are there 6 irons of "horses, which are 
worth id. There is there of cherchetum in money by the year 
6j. 3</. ; also of cherchetum of hens at the feast of St. Martin 150, 
price of each \d. There are there 250 eggs at Easter, and they 
are worth bs. o\d. in the whole. There is there one horse-mill, 
which is worth per annum los. Also 2 windmills and one water- 
mill, which are worth per annum 31J. M. The toll of the fairs 
and market there is worth per annum 30J. There is there a certain 
custom of ploughing of boonday,* which is called Graserth, and is 
worth by the year 6^. 8^. Also the pleas and perquisites of the 
court, reliefs, heriots, and fines of lands by the year are worth 40J. 
The advowson of the church of Wotton belongs to the said manor, 
and that church is worth per annum 30 marks. 

The said manor is held of the Earl of Cornwall for 2 fees of one 
knight. 

Sum of the whole extent of Fasterne and of the said members, 
£$\ IS. ^\d., out of which there is owing towards the ward of the 
Castle of Dover by the year los. And so the sum of the whole 
extent is clear ^53 iis. ^\d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward /, No. 9. 



CDitl), naugljter of gioi^n mxixm* 

InC[UlSltlOn made at Gravelinges on Monday in the feast 
of St. Augustine, 9 Edward I [1281], before Ralph de 
Sandwyco, by the oath oi John de Babefon, Alan de Langejord, Robert 
Cole, Robert Gerand, John le Hoye, Nicholas Serle, Geoffrey Wan'n, 
John le Crocker, Peter de Wodejord, Richard de Stapeljord, Herbert de 
Childhampton, and John Richer, who say that 

Edith, daughter of John Unjray, held in chief of the King on 
the day that she died, in the vill of Wycheford, one messuage, 

* f car^' {precaj-ia), a day's work a tenant is bound to do. Cf. Martin's Record 
Interpreter ; Jacob's Law Dictionary. 



136 Wiltshire 

\\ virgates of land, by the serjeanty of keeping the moiety of the 
forest of Gravelinges, viz., the part towards the north, paying to 
the Priory of Maydenebradelegh of the gift of King Henry, father 
of King Edward that now is, 1 8^., and towards the fabric of the 
church of Sarum zs. The said messuage and land are worth per 
annum 2 ox. 

The said Edith held of Sir Edmund Spygemel and Maurice de 
Bonham half a virgate of land in the same vill, by the service of is. 
by the year and i %d. for the second year, and it is worth per annum 
half a mark. 

Henry de Queyntin is the son and next heir of the said Edith, and 
is aged 30 years. 

Sum of this extent beyond the service due to the lords of the 

fee,' 5 J. id. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward I, No. 22. 



Cl^e abbe0^ of laome^ete* 

Inquisition" made before Salomon de Roff' and William de 
Brayhef, at Wylton on Thursday next after the feast of Low 
Sunday, 9 Edward I [1281], by Philip Estrug, Stephen Driieys, John 
de Cheverel, Richard Estormy, John de Perham, James de Trowe, 
Reginald Buret de Comerwell, Richard Cotele, knights, Walter de 
Leweston, Roger Wykyng, Roger de Burton, William de Molyn, Peter 
de Lavynton, Roger Cleymund, Hugh de Ashgore, and John de 
Cetterne, who say that 

From time immemorial the woods of the Abbess of Romesye of 
Ashton and Ethendon were without the forest and without the 
regard of the forest until the coming of Alan de Nevyll, justice 
assigned for the pleas of the forest in the time of King John, who 
by his will afforested the said woods. And the Abbess, feeling 
herself much injured, after the death of King John, in the time of 
King Henry [HI], obtained from the said King a perambulation to 
be made by William de Lungespee, Earl of Sarum, and his fellows, 
then justices for the pleas of the forest ; by the which perambu- 
lation the said woods were disafforested, and so remained without 
the forest and without the regard of the forest for a long time 
until the time of Robert Passelewe, then justice for the pleas of the 
said forest, who, going through those parts of his own will, 
afforested the said woods. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward I, No. 42. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 137 

iRicl^arD ifufeeram* 

Writ dated 29th March, 9 Edward I [1281]. 

Inquisition made by the oath of Walter Pipard, William 
de Wykes, John de Forstehur\ William de Xlenche, Thomas de 
Foxcote, Robert de Glaunvill, foresters of the foi*est of Savernake, 
William Malewain, Geoffrey Drois, Richard de Suthcote, verderers of 
the same forest, William de Columbar\ Herbert de Stocke, Hugh de 
Combrewell, Robert de Harindene, John de Holme, Pettr Oliver, and 
John Pusard, whether it be to the damage of the King and to the 
injury of the said forest if Richard Fugram, junior, may cut down 
and cultivate all his wood of Holme which is within the metes of 
the said forest and turn it to his own profit or not, etc., etc., who 
say that 

It would not be to the damage of the King or to the hurt of the 
said forest if the said Richard should cut down, cultivate, and turn 
to his own profit his said wood, because that wood is 3 leagues 
away from the adjoining woods of the lord the King in the same 
forest ; and that that wood contains in itself 40 acres by the perch 
of the forest, which the said Richard may cultivate without damage 
to the King or hurt to the said forest, and that in the same wood 
there was not wont to be repair of wild beasts. 

This inquisition was returned at Deneford near Hungerford in 
the morrow of Palm Sunday without the writ. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward I, No. 75. 



T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Wilton before John de Winton, 
A sheriff of Wilts, on Sunday in the vigil of St. Bartholomew 
the Apostle, 10 Edward I [1282], by the oath of Robert Druess, 
Henry le Bret, William Cosyn, John Strugg, John Chynnok, Richard 
le Boer, Robert Vigurus, John de Depejord, Robert le Bule, William de 
Nevile, John de Wynterborn, clerk, Jorden de Laverkestoke, Stephen 
Tott, John Hulon, Thomas de Beauneyr, Robert le Draper, Richard 
son of Henry, Thomas de Wodejande, and Thomas le Frye, of the lands 
and tenements which were of Oliver de Ingeham in his demesne as 
of fee on the day that he died in co. Wilts, and how much he held 
of the King and how much of others, etc., etc., who say that 



138 Wiltshire 

The said Oliver held in the manor of East Codford in rents and 
services of freemen and villeins of the King in chief to the value of 
\oos. There is there pasture for sheep and other animals, which 
is worth by the year 10^. Also 10 acres of meadow, price of the 
acre 1 td. : sum of the price of the acres of meadow by the year, 
I35-. \d. The close of the court with the curtilage and easement of 
the houses is worth per annum i3i-. 4^., with one old dovecote. 
There is there of arable land in the demesne 300 acres, price of 
the acre 6^. : sum of the price of the same £'^ \os. The advowson 
of the Church of St. Mary in the said vill belonged to the said 
Oliver^ and is worth per annum ros. And all these things he held 
of the King in chief in part of the portion belonging to the Barony 
of Dene. Also the pleas and perquisites by the year, 52J. %d. 

The same Olyver held of the King in chief in his demesne as of 
fee in the manor of Dene and Estgrymstede one messuage and one 
virgate of land, which are worth per annum, clear, los. Also in 
rents and services at Est Grymstede by the year, 50J. And all these 
things he held of the King in chief of the portion to him belonging 
of the barony of Deene, by the service of one knight with Codford 
as above. 

Sum-total, £i() 3J. 4<f. 

The same Olyver held of the Bishop of Winchester in Hampte- 
worth one messuage and 40 acres of arable land, and 40J. of yearly 
rent: all which are worth per annum, clear, £^. And he holds of 
the Bishop of Winchester by the service of 5^. per annum. Sum, ^4. 

John de Ingeham, son of the said Olyver, is his next heir, and is- 
aged 24 years and more. 

Sum-total, ;^23 3J. \d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edward /, No. 4. 



Robert ne la^neis, 

InOUlSltlOn made of the lands and tenements of Robert de 
Kaynes, before /. de Wotton, sheriff of Wilts, on Saturday in 
the feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, 10 Edward I 
[1281], by John Wale rand, Roger de Brit el, Walter de la Hoka, 
John de Graunbrigge, Nicholas de Baddebur\ John de Nonys, Henry 
Walerafid, John de la boxe, William le Fowelare, Henry de la 
. . . born, Peter de Brtnnelham, and Richard Bossel, who say that 

The said Robert held of the King in chief 3 parts of the moiety 
of the manor of Chelewurth for the custody of the forest of Braden, 
and that the said Robert was keeper of the said forest by succession 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 139 

of inheritance, and by the service of one esquire in the army of the 
King with one lance, one of iron, and one haqueton, his co-heirs 
and his parceners for the said manor. 

They say also that the easements of the court, houses, and 
garden are worth per annum 55". There are there in the demesne 
44 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth by the year \d. : 
sum 14?. Sd. Also 21 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
the year iid.: sum 21s. There is pasture for 16 oxen, and the 
pasture of each is worth 6d. : sum Ss. Also the pannage of the 
pigs of the forest of Braden, belonging to the said Robert, is worth 
per annum £\o. There is of the rent of assize of the customars 
by the year 53J. o\d. The works of the same are worth by the 
year, with cherchettum, 37^. id. The pleas and perquisites are 
worth per annum \ marlc. Also of the rent of assize of the free 
tenants per annum, with i lb. of pepper, \\s. ']^d. 

Roberi, son of Robert de Kay?ies, is his next heir, and is aged 
ID years and a half. 

Sum of the whole value of the said manor, £^ ^s. si^/. 

The said Roberi held the manor of Somerford of the King in 
chief by the service of one knight's fee. The easements of the 
court, houses, garden, and dovecote are worth per annum 40J. 
There are there in the demesne 340 acres of arable land, and each 
acre is worth per annum ^d. : sum £"] is. 8d. Also 80 acres of 
meadow, each acre whereof is worth per annum 18^.: sum £6. 
There is there a certain several pasture for 32 oxen, and the 
pasture of each ox is worth 6d. : sum i6s. The pasture in common 
is worth per annum 5^. There is there of the rent of assize of 
customars by the year 107^. i^d. The works of the same are 
worth per annum £S ^s. bd. with cherchettum. The tallage of the 
same is worth by the year loos. There is there of the rent of 
assize of the free tenants is. 

Sum of the whole value of the said manor, ;^34 ibs. i\d. 

The said Roberi held in the manor of Aston 2 carucates of land 
of the Abbot of Teukesbury, by the service of 3^. of yearly rent, 
and the said Abbot of the Earl of Gloucester, and the said Earl of 
the King in chief. The easements of the court, houses, garden, 
and dovecote are worth per annum y. ^d. There are there in the 
demesne 102 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth by the 
year 4c/., sum 34^. ; also 42 acres of meadow, and each acre is 
worth izd., sum 42^. There is there pasture for 16 oxen, and 
the pasture of each is worth 4^/. : sum ^s. ^d. There is there of 
rent of assize of the customars by the year 6^'. 6^/. The works 
of the same are worth by the year, with cherchettum, 39J. 



140 Wiltshire 

There is there of the rent of assize of free tenants by the year %s. 

Sum of the total value of the said manor, £(i \%s. zd. 

The said Robert held in Peritone one carucate of land of the 
Abbot of Malmsbury, by the service of the fourth part and the 
half of the fourth part of one knight's fee, and the said Abbot of 
the King in chief. 

The easements of the court, with the croft adjoining, are worth 
by the year \os. There are there 61 acres of arable land of the 
demesne, and each acre is worth by the year \d., sum 20s. ^d. ; 
also 12 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by the year i^d., 
sum 14J. There is there a several pasture which is worth by the 
year 2s. And another pasture for 8 oxen, and the pasture of each 
is worth by the year 4^. : sum zs. 8d. The pannage with the 
windfall wood Icabelicw'] is worth by the year 25-. There is there of 
the rent of assize of the customars by the year 58J. zd. The works 
of the same are worth by the year, with cherchettum, 41J. ']d. The 
profit of the court is worth by the year 2s. There is there of the 
rent of assize of the free tenants by the year 6s. gd. Sum of 
the total value of the said manor, £■] iSs. td. 

Sum of the sums of all the said manors, ;^58 \s. /^\d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edward I, No. 16. 



Extent of the lands and tenements formerly of Robert de 
Kaynes. 

Somerford is worth in all things £i\ \bs. ^\d., and because the 
manor is whole let it be put without increase for one part to 
whomsoever it shall happen, and the sum of the third part will 
be £2$ ss. 2d., and there is wanting of the said manor the sum 
of 8^. I id., but it will not be such a part because the manor is 
whole and free. 

Chelewurthe is worth in all things £8 Ss. Std. 

Aystone is worth in all things £6 1 Ss. 2d. 

Tarente is worth in all things £1^ 16s. i^d. 

Cumbe is worth in all things £g p. b\d. 

Sum of the sums, £1% 6s. ^d. 

And these 4 manors are very remote from each other, and are 
worth very little, neither are they whole, and there is put of the 
rent of Cumbe 52J. to Doddeford and Perytone to make up the 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 141 

third part, and the sum remaining will be £1^ x^s. ■}(!., and so 
there will be %s. of surplus, and specially because they are small 
and remote parts, and there is only a deficit in the first part, which 
is Somerford, because it is whole and good. 

Dodeford is worth in all things £i^ 14J. %\d. 

Perj'tone is worth in all things £"] i?>s. 6d. 

Sum of the sums, £-^1 \y. z\d., and with 52^. from Cumbe the 
sum will be £'i$ 5^. 2\d., and so the 2 parts will be equal in value. 

They say that Tarente is the chief manor, and without Ayston 
the bailiwick of the forestry cannot well be kept [custodiri~\. 



mtutam ne i^ol^un^ 

-w- • • . 

I fK^UlSltlOn made on Thursday next before the feast of 
A St. Dionisius, 10 Edward I [1282], of the lands and tene- 
ments which were of William de Mohun in co. Wilts, before 
/. de Wb/lon, sheriff and escheator, by Reginald Waz, John de Bosco, 
William de Cardenil, Everard de la Dene, Richard Tebant, Waller de 
la Hamslall, John de Dunnesford, Nicholas de Bosco, Philip de Bosco, 
John de Barsthrop, and John de la More, who say that 

The said William died seised in his demesne as of fee of the 
manor of Myldehal, and held the same of the heirs of the Earl de 
Ferariis for one knight's fee, the heirs of the Earl of the heirs of 
the Marshall, the heirs of the Marshall of the heirs of the Earl 
de Lungesspeie, the heirs of Lung' of the Abbot of Glaslon\ and 
the Abbot of Glasloti' of the King. 

The rents of the free tenants are worth by the year 50^. 3^/. ; the 
rents of the customars, 106^-. %^d. ; the works of the customars, 
60^. i\\d. The easements of the houses, with the issues of the 
garden, are worth* per annum los. The pleas and perquisites of 
the court are worth per annum iSj. There are in. the said manor 
of arable land 200 acres by the perch, and each acre is worth by 
itself \d., and the sum is 66^. M.; also 24 acres of meadow, and 
each acre is worth by itself 2s., and the sum is 48^. The profit of 
the wood is worth by the year 3^. The pannage and herbage and 
pasture are worth to be sold by the year 7^. ^d. They also say 
that 4 horses, 24 oxen, 4 cows, and 8 steers can be sustained there, 
and each is worth by itself by the year bd., and the sum is 20s. 
In the said manor 400 sheep can be sustained in pasture, and it is 
worth by the year 16^. The cherchettum and rent of the eggs are 
worth per annum 4^. bd. 



142 . Wilis hire 

The next heir of the said William is Reginald de Mohum, his son 
and heir, who will be aged 6 years in the quindene before the 
feast of the Nativity of Our Lord next coming. 

Sum of the sums, ;^20 i is. sd. 

Ihan. Itiq. p.m., 10 Edward I, No. 19. 



Extent made of the manor of Middelton Lillebon in the 
hundred of Kynewardeston, in co. Wilts, on Monday before 
the feast of the Apostles SS. Simon and Jude, 10 Edward I [1282], 
by Richard de Suthcote, Geoffrey Drues, and William Warin, Robert 
Pipard, Stephen Baxman^ Ivo de Kepemill, William Biixman, Thomas 
de la Clenche, William de Stoddleye, Waller Paumer, John Gervays, 
and Thomas de Humbre, who say that 

The manor of INIiddelton Lillebon is held for one knight's fee of 
John de Ncvile, and the said John holds the same manor in chief 
of the King. John de Nevile gave the wardship and marriage of the 
heir of Walter Lillebon to John le Butelir for his service, and 
the said John de Butelir sold the said wardship and marriage to 
Rolond de Erleye until the [full] age of the heir of Walter de Lillebon, 
who now holds the said manor. All the court and dovecote and 
o-arden are worth bv the year 6.r. %d. The mill is worth by the 
year 20^. There are 180 acres upon the hill, and each acre is 
worth by the year bd. : sum £\ \os. Also 100 acres upon the 
hill, and each acre is worth by the year id. : sum %s. ^d. Also 
8 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by the year 3^. : sum 
z.{s. Also pasture for 24 oxen, and the pasture of each ox is 
\yorth sd., sum los.; also pasture for 10 cows, and the pasture of 
each cow is worth s^-i sum 4^. 2d. Also pasture for 300 female 
sheep, and the pasture of each sheep is worth id. : sum 25^. 
There is there one wood, and it contains in itself 100 acres and 
more, and they were wont to take housebote and haybote at will, 
and now they can have nothing except by the view of the verderers 
and forestars, and it is worth by the year 6s. Sd. 

Beneger de Fifid holds of the said manor 4 virgates of l^nd, and 
he ought to hold the court of his lord for the said land, and he 
ought to eat with his lord when he holds the court. John Geruays, 
Roger le Boys, and Walter de Miilecote ought to plough 13 acres, 
and the ploughing of each acre is worth 2\d. : sum zs. 8-\d. Richard 



Inquisittones Post Mortem. 143 

Horner holds \\ virgates of land, and shall give by the year zs. ^d. 
Roysa, daughter of Walter Page, holds 2 virgates, and shall give by 
the year id. Adam Robbe holds i^ virgates of land and one 
meadow which is called Childeslade, and shall give by the year id. 
John Hameleyn holds one virgate of land, and shall give by the year 
bd. William de Stoddleye holds 2 virgates and one cothsethla of 
land, and shall give by the year ts. id. And the said William de 
Stoddleye has pasture for 8 oxen going everywhere with the oxen of 
the lord except pannage (?), and at the pasture upon the hill for 
60 mother sheep and i ram. Walter Paumer holds half a virgate 
of land, and shall give by the year 6j. Walter le Blaw [? Blade'] 
holds 2 virgates of wild land for the term of his life, and shall give 
by the year bs. Richard Pak holds half a virgate of land for life, 
and shall give by the year bs. There are 21 men, natives, and 
each of them holds half a virgate of land, and each of them shall 
give by the year 4J. 8^., and the service of each of them is worth 
by the year izd.: sum iigj. All the men aforesaid, as well free 
as natives, give scutage when it shall run and suit at court. Also 
10 cottars pay by the year in the whole for rent at the 4 terms 
20J. \d., and the works of the same are worth by the year 2^. bd. 

Sum of the sums of the money in the whole, ;^i8 6^. 8.W. 

Memorandum, that the 2 ladies \dne'\ have of the said manor 
2 dowers. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edward I, No. 22. 



Inquisition made before /. de Wiitton, sheriff of Wilts, on 
Friday next before the feast of All Saints, 10 Edward I [1282], 
of the lands, tenements, fees, and advowsons of churches which 
were oi John de Nevyle, by 12 jurors of the hundreds of Caudon 
and Cadeworth, viz., by Geoffrey de Chaucombe, Walter Ermvy, 
Walter Gilebcrd, Robert ad Crticem, Robert Gerand, Peter de Molend\ 
Thomas ad Pontem, Thomas le Rus^ John Martyn, Ralph le Fraunk, 
Walter Thom\ and Walter Warde, who say that 

William Gereberd holds his manor of Edestoke with the advowson 
of the church of the same manor of the said John de Nevyle by the 
service of one knight, and the said John of the King in chief, and 
the said manor is worth per annum £^0, and the church is worth 
10 marks. 



1 44 Wiltshire 

The S2L\d./ohn had no other fees, neither are any held of him \n 
CO. Wilts, except in the hundred of Rynewardston, as appears by 
the inquisition by 12 men of the same hundred. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edward I, No. zz. 



Writ dated nth June, 10 Edward I [1282], and directed to 
H. de Kendale and W. de Odiham, commanding them that 
having inspected the extent herein enclosed they should command 
the Sheriff of Wilts to commit to Sir Eustace de Haches the view of 
frank-pledge whereof mention is made: to hold until the King 
shall command otherwise by the extent thereof made. 

Value of the view of frank-pledge in the manor of Westhatche, 
which is in the hundred of Duneworth, whereof the extent was 
made by Robert Maudut, William de Brideserd, John de Nyppred, 
Roger Purbik, Thomas de Sualeweclyve, William Mahu, John de Affold, 
John Attejord, Walter de Ode, Thomas Vincent, Walter le Guth, and 
Walter de Rucombe, who say that 

The tithing of the manor of Westhatch gives yearly for the 
tourn of the sheriff zs. \\\d., and for tithing-penny lold. The 
emends of the assize of ale broken are worth by the year 2^.,. 
which said assize is presented at the hundred of the lord the King 
every three weeks. 

And so the sum of the whole value is 5^. io\d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., \o Edward I, JVo. 29. 



iWatiltia3 uaugljter of iKogcr motietDatti^ 

Writ dated 22nd September, 11 Edward I [1283]. 

Inquisition taken at Berefford, in co. Wilts, on Thursday 
next after the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, 12 Edward I 
[1283], of the lands and tenements which were of ^/a//A/a, daughter 
of Roger Wodeward, on the day that she died, and of other articles 
contained in the said writ, by the oath of Alan de Longejord, Edmund 
Falk, Geoffrey Waryn, Nicholas Serle, Thomas le Savage, Walter 
Eriieivy, Walter Gilberd, William Lamberd, Nicholas de Ecclesia, 
Geoffrey CoJ, Robert Ysunberd, Richard de la More, Nicholas Prekemere^ 
and Robert Russell, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 145 

The said Matilda held one messuage and 2 virgates of land in 
the vill of Bereford of the King in chief, by the serjeanty of keeping 
the moiety of the King's forest of Gravelingges, paying therefor 
to the King's exchequer <^s. by the year, by the hand of the Sheriff 
of Wilts, and towards the fabric of the church of St. Mary of 
Sarum \id. by the year. The said Matilda also held of the 
Prioress of Ambreshury one virgate of land in the vill of Bereford, 
excepting out of the same virgate 9 acres of land which the said 
Matilda gave with her daughter in free marriage at the Nativity 
of the Lord, 6 Edward I [1277], paying to the said Prioress by the 
year %s., and it is worth per annum, clear, half a mark, saving the 
year aforesaid. The said 2 virgates of land are worth per annum, 
clear, zos. besides the said rent. 

Roger de Camera, son of the said Matilda, is her next heir, and 
is aged 30 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edward I, No. 5. 



^atrtctu^ De Cauurciis* 

Extent of the manor of Staundon, in co. Wilts, which was 
of Patrick de Cadurcis, made on Saturday in the vigil of 
St. James the Apostle, 1 1 Edward I [1283], by the oath of John de 
Stotescoumb, John le Blunynt, William le Palmere, John de Stocke, 
William Werewelle, Ada??i Attebarre, William Hyreys, William Long, 
Richard Saemer, Ralph GihUcray, John le Fowell, and John son of 
Peter, who say that 

The said Patrick held the said manor of the King in chief, 
belonging to the manor of Kenemarford. The said Patrick was 
patron \_advocatus'] of the chapel of Standon, and it is worth by the 
year lo^., saving the service. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the year 6^-. %d. 
There is there a certain water-mill, and it is worth by the year 20s. ; 
also free fishery of a certain water, and it is worth is. by the year. 
Sum, 28J. 8<f. 

There are there in the demesne 2 26 J acres i rood of arable land 
by the lesser hundred, and each acre is worth per annum 5^. : sum 
£\ i\s. sd. Also 3J acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
the year 3^. : sum 10s. td. The several pasture is worth by the 
year bs. Sd. There is there a certain wood containing 4 acres, the 
pasture whereof is worth by the year i zd. Sum, 1 1 zs. y^d. 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. II. J 

1 " 



146 Wilts kire 

There are there 4 free tenants who pay by the year 49^. i id., viz., 
at the feast of St. Michael i6j. lo^^., at the feast of St. Thomas 
the Apostle gj. 4}^., at the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 
14J. 4i(/., and at the feast of "St. John the Baptist qj. 4,ld. There 
are there 13 customars who hold one virgate of land and certain 
other particulars of land, and they pay 49J. 8</. by the year at the 
4 said terms, viz., at each of them izs. 5^. Also the rent of the 
hens at the feast of St. Martin is 7^-. Sum, 106^. ^d. 

The works and customs of the said customars are worth by the 
year izs. ^\d., viz., for ploughing zs. ^\d., for the carriage of 
customs 6d., for carrying of hay and weeding 13!^., for carrying 
writs zod. Also pannage of pigs zd. Sum, izs. 4r\d. 

Reliefs, redemptions, and heriots are worth per annum 40^. 

Sum of the sums, £1^ 3^. y^?. 

And be it known that Margery Dansey holds the third part of the 
said township in dower by reason of Peter Si. Martin, formerly her 
husband, and for some time lord of the said township, which said 
third part is not extended above. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edward I , No. 35. 



Extent of the manor of Berewyk, in co. Wilts, which was 
of Patrick de Cadurcis, made on Sunday in the feast of 
St. Peter ad Vincula, 11 Edward I [1283], by Alan de Longesford, 
Richard de Slapelford, John le Fraunkeleyn, Edrmind de Weynlerburn, 
Edmund Atte Elme of the same, Gilbert Giffard,John le Kneyt, Richard 
Huppehull, Walter le Erie, Geoffrey Warin, John Richer, and William 
Wylihaund, who say that 

The said Patrick held the said manor of Berewyk of the King in 
chief, belonging to the barony of Kenemareford. The said 
Patrick was patron {advocatus\ of the church of Berewyk, and it is 
worth by the year 20 marks. 

The capital messuage with the garden and dovecote is worth by 
the year 6j. 8^. There are there 300 acres of arable land by the 
lesser hundred, and each acre is worth zd.-. sum 50J. Also 
7 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth 2^.: sum \\s. The 
pasture there in common is worth by the year 4^. Sum, 74J. M. 

The rent of assize of the free tenants is worth by the year 
1 3^. \d. at the feast of St. John the Baptist : sum i mark. Also 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 147 

the rent of assize of 22 customars who hold 8 J virgates of land and 
certain portions of land which are called Akerlond, and pay by the 
year with the rent of the cottars at the feast of St. Michael 29J. %d., 
and at each of the terms of the Nativity of the Lord, Easter, and 
St. John the Baptist, 29^. zd. : sum 29J. zd. Sum, iiyj. zd. Also 
the rent of the hens at the feast of St. Martin is worth 8j. 

Sum, £t 1 8 J. td. 

The works and customs of the said customars as in herbage to 
be paid at the feasts of St. Peter ad Vincula and St. Martin, loj. 
The pannage of the pigs of the same at the feast of St. Martin, \zd. 
Also divers works of the same by the year, 51J. 5^^/. Sum, 625-. ^\d. 

The fines of land, reliefs, and heriots are worth by the year \s. 

Sum of the sums, £\-i, 19J. i^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edward I, No. 35. 



J^atticiu0 ne canutci^. 

Extent of the manor of Hanedon, in co. Wilts, which 
was of Patrick de Cadurcts, made on Friday in the 
morrow of the Blessed Mary Magdalene, 11 Edward I [1284], 
by Thomas de Noneyjis, Roger Brian, William de la Cote, William 
Wython, James le Paumer, Robert de Meysey, John le Breyt, Geoffrey 
de Maundevill, John le Cen (? Geu), Robert de Noneyns, Robert de 
Molend\ and Nicholas Cannell {} Caunell), who say that 

The said Patrick held the said manor of Hanedon of the King 
in chief by the service of half a knight's fee. The said Patrick 
was the patron of the church at Hanedon, and it is worth by the 
year 30 marks. 

The capital messuage with the garden and dovecote is worth 
by the year i$s. There are there in the demesne 423 acres of 
arable land by the lesser hundred, and each acre is worth by the 
year M.: sum £ijf. zs. There are 212J acres of meadow by 
the lesser hundred, and each acre is worth by the year i6d.: 
sum £■] 10s. The several pastures extend to 66s. The common 
pasture there is worth by the year los. There is there a certain 
water-mill, and it is worth by the year z6s. 8d. The free fishery 
in the Tameyse is worth per annum 3J. ^.d. Sum, ;^27 i^s. 

There are there 10 free tenants who pay by the year 74J. A.d., 
at 4 terms, viz., at the feast of St. Michael 32J. zd., at the feast 
of St. Thomas the Apostle 5^. 6d., at the Annunciation of the 



148 Wiltshire 

Blesse3 Mary 5J. 6d., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist 
3 1 J. 2d. There are 44 customars who hold ^i^ virgates of land, 
and pay by the year j^-j i8j. bd., viz., at the feast of St. Michael 
79^. 3<f., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist 79^. ^d. There 
are 12 cottars who pay at the said terms iis. bd. The works 
and customs of the said customars are worth by the year 64?. 5^. 
Sum, £11 %s. qd. 

Also tallage of villeins at the feast of St. Michael each year, 60^. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court, with wards, reliefs, 
and heriots, bbs. 8d. 

Sum of the whole, ;^49 8^. 5^. 



The extent of Inglesham made by the said jurors the day and 
year above written. 

The capital messuage with the easement of the necessary 
houses is worth by the year izd. 

There are there in the demesne 54 acres of arable land, and 
each acre is worth by the year Sd. : sum $6s. Also 22 acres 
of meadow, and each acre is worth by the year 18^: sum 33^. 
The several pasture is worth by the year 6^. Sum, 76^. 

There are there 4 free tenants, and they pay 12^-, ^^d. at the 
feast of St. Michael. Also 1 1 customars who hold 7J virgates 
of land and pay 39J. ^d. at the said term. Sum, 51J. 6^d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court, with reliefs and heriots, los. 

Sum of the whole, £6 1 7^. 6^d. 

Sum of all the sums, £$6 ^s. ii^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edioard T, No. 35. 



Writ dated 5th October, 11 Edward I [1283]. 

Inquisition made at Confand by Sir John de Wolio7i, 
sheriff of Wilts, on Sunday in the morrow of St. Edmund 
the King, 12 Edward I [1284], by the oath of Sir Thomas dc la 
Mare, knight. Sir Henry de Cerne, knight, Robert de la Let, 
Wyhert de Cherleton, John de Hanekynton, Jordan del Eiue, Alexander 
de Somerjord, William Baillemund, Richard de Strikele, John le Gag, 
Richard Pirjtl, and William de Cnabwelle, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 149 

The manor of Staunton St. Quinton is held of the Earl of 
Gloucester by knight's service, making from 3 weeks to 3 weeks 
a certain suit at the court of the said Earl at Bristol, Theokesbur', 
or at Fayreford, one of these manors at the will of the said Earl ; 
and the said Earl of Gloucester holds the said manor of Staunton 
of the King in chief. 

The bailiff of the lord the King of the hundred of Scerkele 
takes of the said manor of Staunton by the year for the toum 
of the sheriff i6j., whereof the King takes one moiety by the 
hand of the said bailiff, and the Abbot of Malmeshury takes 
the other moiety by the hands of the said bailiff belonging to 
his fee farm which he holds of the King. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edward I, No. 52. 



€8iDtu0 tie -fflot^* 

Inquisition made at Postellesbury in the forest of 
Selwood ®n Thursday in the feast of St. Katherine the 
Virgin, 12 Edward I [1283], by command of the King, before 
Richard de Plessetts, keeper of the said forest, by Ralph Huscarl, 
Henry de Karevile, Walter le Boteler, verderers, Nicholas le Mare- 
schal, Nicholas Poor, John de la Bruere, William Polayn, regarders, 
Philip de Gryndeham, knight, Maurice de Benham, William de Gode- 
Jiianeston, John de Corfeles, Brice de Bradelegh, Henry Brittun, 
Henry Wylchet, Robert le Colyere, Nicholas Vincent, Adam Pens tan, 
William de Seles, and Robert Vincent, all foresters and woodwards 
of the said forest, who say that 

The wood of Giles de Flory which he wishes to assart is called 
Coppemor, and contains of cover of wood 6 acres, and of pasture 
outside the cover of the wood 12 acres, and joins the vill of 
Claford on the one part and the close of Charthosie on the 
other, and to the cover of the forest in the breadth of i quaren- 
tine (40 perches) on the third part. There is there no repair of 
wild beasts of the King, and the said Giles may enclose the said 
wood if he has licence from the King, and it would not be to 
the damage of the King nor to the hurt of the said forest. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edward I, No. 83. 

1 1 • 



1 50 Wiltshire 



(lD!alfrit)U0 De appall 

I n(][U.lSltlOn made at'Kyngbrigge before John de Wo/fon^ 
JL sheriff of Wilts, of the tenements of Geoffrey de Haspal, on 
Friday next after the feast of St. Martin, 11 Edward I [1283], 
by the oath of John Walerand, Peter Bluet, Thomas Eyeis, Nicholas 
Stigant, Roger Stive, James de Grundewelle, Thomas Milewardy 
William Witsand, John de Chilton, John de Horeputte, Elias Bide, 
William de Litlecote, who say that 

The tenement of the said Master Geoffrey de Haspal \n Northlidiaid 
is held by the Earl of Warwick by knight's service, and the said 
Earl holds of the King in chief by the fifth part of a knight's fee, 
and it is worth per annum, clear, zbs. Sd. No other damage can 
happen to the King unless he shall have the wardship of the heirs 
of the said Earl ; then he will lose the custody of the ward and 
marriage if they shall happen of the heirs of the said Geoffrey. 

The jurors say that no malefactors nor disturbers of the peace 
with force and arms took away the goods and chattels of Edmund 
de Mortuo Man io the value of £10 at Clive Wanci, but Thomas Yve 
and others unknown came from the tavern beyond the field of Clyve 
on the day of Holy Trinity, 11 Edward I [1283], and obstructed 2 
of the servants of the said Edmund, to wit, Richard Ernewode and 
Robert de Chippeham, and wished the said Richard and Robert to let 
them go without pledges, and the said Thomas Yve and others did 
not permit them to attach them or to let them go without pledges, 
so that there was a disturbance between them, so that the said 
Thomas Yve and others wounded and maltreated the said Richard 
Ernevoode and Robert de Chippeham. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Ediuard I, No. 95. 



EXlCnt of the manor of Sende which was of Wyganus dt 
Scyreborn in co. Wilts, made at Bklalmesbury on Thursday in 
the morrow of St. Edward, 1 1 Edward I [i 283], by Sir Robert de Mesy, 
Sir William de la ]\Iarc, John Walerand, John de Mtsy, knights, Walter 
Frary, John de Hanckcton, John de Cambo, Miles de Scawell, Roger de 
Scawe, Robert de Camera, William Osward, Wahuyn de Falcumbcy 



Inqitisitiones Post Mortem. 151 

Hugh de Wul\emere, William de Turkeden, William Balimunde, and 
Alexander de Sumer/ord, who say that 

The said IVygafius held the said manor of the King in chief by 
the service of the fourth part of one knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the garden, vineyard, and dovecote is 
worth by the year 26s. 8d. There are there 154. acres of arable 
land by the lesser hundred, and each acre is worth Sd. : sum 
102s. 8d. Also 33 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth izd. : 
sum 33J. The several pasture there is worth by the year 20s. 

The rent of assize of the free tenants and customars is worth by 
the year £-j js. o^d. The works of the customars are worth by the 
year 40J. 6d. The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth by 
the year 40^. 

Sum of the whole extent, ;^2o 9^-. jo^d. 

The said Wyganus died on Friday next after the feast of St. Mark 
the Evangelist, 11 Edward I [1283]; he married Cristiana^ 
daughter of Richard de Bosco, of Cheddeworth, in co. Gloucester, 
by whom he had a son named John, who is aged 24 years and more, 
and who in the lifetime of the said Cristiana married Ellen and 
had issue by her, but the said John begotten of the said Cristiana 
is the next heir of the said liyganus. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edivard I, No. 104. 



2Htganu)3 De Cl^ireburglj* 

Extent of the manor of Scheynd, in co. Wilts, which 
was of Wjgaiius de Cherhurgh, made on Wednesday next 
before the feast of St. Margaret, 11 Edward I [1283], by Peter 
de Chastivod, Peter de Baldejiham, William de Leyccstre, Roger de 
Schawe, Roger de Lclleshull, Hugh de Wolfmere, John Wyger, John 
Self, Richard Alisaundre, Johii de Aldrenton, Roger Godiven, and 
Reginald de Novavilla, who say that 

The said Wyganus held the said manor of Schynd of the King 
in chief by a service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. He also 
held a certain coppice within the demesne of Scheynd, for the 
which he pays to the King by the year \id. 

[The value of the capital messuage and land is the same as 
in the previous inquisition.] 

Sum, £,(^ 2S. \d. 



152 Wiltshire 

The rent of assize there of the free tenants is 405. 9^^. by the 
year. The rent of assize of the customars and cottars by the 
year is lods. ^. by the year. The rent of hens at the feast of 
St. Martin is 7^. 2d. The works and customs of the customars 
there who hold 9 J virgates of land are worth 575. 

Sum, ;^io lis. ^^d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court, with the heriots and 
merchets, are worth by the year 1 35-. \d. 

Sum of the sums of the whole, ;^2o bs. ii^d., whereof izd. of 
yearly rent to be paid to the King at the feast of St. Michael. 

John, son of the said IVyganus, is his next heir, and was aged 

21 'years in the feast of St. Katherine the Virgin, 11 Edward I 

[1282]. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 11 Edward I ^ No. 104. 



I nqUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
X Henry Quyntyn in co. Wilts on the day that he died, 
made at Wilton in the said county, before the King's escheator, 
on Tuesday next before the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, 
13 Edward I [1284], by Geoffrey de Chanciimh, John le Hoy, John 
le Chamberleyn, Richard de Stapd/ord, Nicholas Serle, John Richer, 
Thomas le Savage, Robert atte Crtich, Roger Davyd, William le Porter, 
Robert Alisaundre, William de Wyteclyve, and Hugh Russer, who 
say that 

Henry Quyntyn held of the King in chief a certain tenement 
in Magna Wichford in the hundred of Brenchesbury.in the said 
county, for his homage and by the service of keeping the moiety 
of the forest of Groveley towards the north. 

The capital messuage, with the garden, fruit, and herbage, is 
worth by the year half a mark. There are there in the demesne 
36 acres of arable land, and each acre is worth by the year 4^, : 
sum lis. Also 2 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by 
the year 3^. : sum 6s. There are there 3 free tenants who pay 
at the feast of St. Michael i^. The said Henry pays at the said 
term to the hospital at Bradel for the said tenement los., which 
said rent King Henry, father of King Edward, assigned to the 
said hospital in frankalmoign, and zs. to the fabric of the Church 
of St. Mary of Sarum. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 153 

Sum of the value of the said tenement besides the said rent, 

He held in the same vill of Wichford of the fee of Maurice de 
Bonham. and Edmund Spigumel 18 acres of arable land, and each 
acre is worth by the year 4^. : sum bs. And he pays for the said 
tenement to the said Edmund and Maurice at the feast of 
St. Michael each year ^\d., and so the sum of the value of the 
said tenement is 55-. z\d. There is there of the said fee half an 
acre of meadow, and it is worth bd. by the year. 

Sum of this tenement besides the said rent, 5J. %\d. 

The said Henry held in the vill of Stoford next Wichford in the 
said hundred of the fee of the Abbess of Wilton one tenement by 
socage. The capital messuage with the curtilage is worth by the 
year half a mark. There are there in the demesne 60 acres of 
arable land, and each acre is worth by the year id.\ sum \os. 
Also one acre of meadow and the fourth part of one acre, and it is 
worth in the whole by the year zs. The said Henry pays to the 
said Abbess at 5 terms of the year 95-. i\d.^ viz., on the day of 
St. Kalixtus the Pope zi\d., in the feast of the Epiphany of the 
Lord zz\d., on the 9th day of March zi\d., at the feast of 
St. Dunstan %z\d.^ and at the feast of the Seven Sleepers zr\d. 

Sum of this tenement besides the said rent, 95. \%d. 

Sum-total, 3 1 J. ^\d. 

The said Henry Quyntyn died on Saturday next before the feast 
of the Apostles Simon and Jude, \z Edward I [1284]. William 
Quyntyn is his son and next heir, and was aged 28 years on 
the feast of St. jNIartin, 12 Edward I [1284]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward I, No. 6. 



!Stcl)arD De CurbettJiUe^ 

Edward, .hy the grace of God, etc., to Master Henry de Bray, 
escheator on this side the Trent. 

Because Richard de Turherville, who held in chief of Richard son 
of Alan, being within age and in our custody, has died, as we 
understand, we command you to take into our hands all the lands 
and tenements whereof the said Richard de Turherville was seised 
in his demesne as of fee in your bailiwick and to keep them safely, 
until we command you further, etc., etc. 

Witness ourself at Carnarvon, i April, 12 Edward I [1284], 

Edward, by the grace of God, etc., to the said escheator. 



154 Wiltshire 

Because Richard de Turberville, who held the third part of the 
serjeanty of our chapel of us in chief, has died, as we understand, 
we command you diligently to enquire as to the value of the said, 
third part by the year, etc. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.., 12 Edward I, No. 12. 



Bicljarti tie Curbertitlle* 

-«P • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Newbury on Sunday next after the 
X feast of St. John ante Portam Latinam, 12 Edward I [1284], 
by the oath of Geoffrey de Wancy, knight, Geoffrey de Thorbervile, 
Andrezv de Hancoc, Richard de Elfinton, Roger Beornard, John de 
Ildesleye, Thomas Bocun, Peter de Uffinton^ Richard de Wesiwode, 
Robert Dryn, Ralph de Elfinton, and William de Euerinton., as to how 
much the serjeanty of the chapel of the lord the King which 
Richard de Turbervile, who held of the King in chief [held], is 
worth clear by the year, who say that 

The third part of the said serjeanty which the said Richard 
de Turbervile held for the term of his life of the demise of Sir Oliver 
de Stanford, is worth per annum, clear, 24 marks. 

Isabella dc Stanford and Amicia her sister are the next heirs of the 
said serjeanty, and are of full age. 

Chan. Itiq. p.m., 12 Edivard I, N'o. 12. 



IStcljarD tie CurbertitlL 

Henry, by the grace of God, etc., to the Archbishops, etc. 

We have inspected the charter which Oliver de Stanford made to 
Richard de Titrbervill of the serjeanty and his office as well of our 
chapel as of our seal, in these words : — Know all men that I, Oliver 
de Stanford, have given and confirmed to Richard de Turbervill for 
his service my serjeanty and office as well of the King's chapel as of 
his seal : to hold to him all the days of his life of me and my heirs, 
with all the liberties and emoluments thereto belonging, saving to 
me and my heirs the lordship of the rod to the said serjeanty 
belonging, paying yearly to me and my heirs one mark of silver. 
And I and my heirs will warrant the said serjeanty and office to the 
said Richard de Turbervill as long as he shall live, against all men 
and women. 



Inq7nsitioiies Post Mortem. 155 

These being witnesses : Sir Walter de Riper, Sir William Huscarl, 
Sir Richard Marlel, Sir Philip le Moygne, John de Scyiizlyr, Henry de 
la Huse, William le Cortier, Reginald de Irdesle, Robert de Turbenully 
William de Pavely, William de la Grave, and many others [unnamed]. 
We, being agreeable to the same, hereby confirm it, these being 
witnesses : Hugh le Bygod, our justiciar, John de Crakehal, our 
treasurer, Giles de Argentem, Imberto Pugeys, Simon Passelewe, Hugh 
de Dyne, Imberto de Muntferant. Given by our hand at Westminster, 
8 October, 43 Henry III [1259]. And for the said confirmation 
he gave to the King one mark of silver, which he paid into the 
wardrobe of the King, and is quit. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward I, No. 12. 



COilliam De i3ra^l)oef» 

-_. • « • 

I nCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
X Sir William de Braybef at C^adewiz in the hundred of INIera 
in CO. Wilts, made at Chadewyz before John de Henfon, sub- 
escheator in the said county, on Monday next before the feast of 
the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, 12 Edward I [1284], by 
Roger de Burgton, Walter Wymiind, Roger Wygvng, Henry de 
Pynperleye, Edward Luddut, John de Burgton, Henry le Feure, 
William de Burton, Robert Artur, Robert de la Lcyc, John Martyn, 
Thomas Moknd\ John Hodel, Elias de Crojta, Walter Pymiok, Robert 
de Cftowel, who say that 

The said William held nothing in fee in the said hundred on the 
day that he died, but he held the said manor of Chadewiz by 
reason of Joan de St. Martin, whom he took to wife : which said 
Joan was thereof enfeoffed by a certain Joaji de Ntyvile for a long 
time before the said William married the said Joan de St. Martifi, 
wherefore they say that the said William had nothing in the said 
manor except by reason of the said Joan, who still survives and 
still holds the said manor by the said feoffment of Sir William de 
St. Martin, heir of the said Joan de Neyvile, paying therefor 
yearly to the same 6r/. or one pair of gilt spurs ; and the said William 
de St. Martin of the Earl of Lincoln of the manor of Sarum. And 
the said manor is worth per annum, clear, Jj\o. 

The said Williim de BraybeJ died on Tuesday next before the 
feast of St. Dunstan in the said year ; Hugh de Braybef is the son 
and next heir of the said Williain, and was aged 19 years at Easter, 
12 Edward I [1284]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edivard J, N'o. 13. 



156 Wiltshire 

milKam De 'Bratbef^ 

InCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Sir William de Brayhef zX Crofton, in co. Wilts, made there 
before John de Hinton, then sub-escheator, on Saturday next after 
the feast of St. Bartholomew the Apostle, 12 Edward I [1284], by 
William Malwayn, Ralph de Cnolle, John le Blund, Eustace de Ponte, 
John de Wul/hale, Geoffrey Cormongere, John de Basing, Oshert 
Giffard, Stephen Sewyne, William de Morion, William de Colewe, 
and Richard Burgilun, who say that 

The said William held the manor of Crofton in the said county 
of Humphrey de Boun, Earl of Herejord, by the service of half a 
knight's fee. 

The capital messuage of the said manor, with the gardens, 
fruit, and herbage, is worth by the year is. There are there 
80 acres of arable land in the demesne, and each acre is worth 
by the year \d.: sum 26J. %d. Also in the demesne 132 acres 
of arable land, and each acre is worth by the year ^d. : sum 33J. 
Also 4 acres of meadow, and each acre by the year 1 Sd. : 
sum 6s. There is there a certain wood containing 40 acres, 
whereof the lord has housebote and haybote, and nothing else 
except by the view of the foresters, and this heasement of the 
said wood is worth by the year 2s. There is there a certain water- 
mill, which is worth by the year 5J. There are there 7 free tenants, 
who pay at the four terms of the year 43 J. 10^., to wit, at the Nativity 
of the Lord los. iod., at the feast of the Annunciation of the 
Blessed Mary i \s. id., at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist 10s. lod., and at the feast of St. Michael iis. id. There 
are there 8 customars who pay by the year at the said terms 38^., 
viz., at each term gs. 6d. There are there 3 cottars who pay by the 
year 4J. 6d., viz., at each term i8d. Six of the said 8 customars 
each ought to plough half an acre at the winter sowing and to 
harrow after the feast of St. Michael, and that ploughing and 
harrowing are worth common years 151^. And the said 6 customars 
shall sow the said land with their own seed, to wit, with wheat, and 
that sowing is worth common years 3J., viz., each bushel 6d. 
Two of the said customars and 3 of the said cottars shall give at the 
feast of St. IMartin for cherchetum 3 hens and i cock, viz., each of 
them 3 hens and i cock, and they are worth common years zod 
The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum zs. 

Sum, ^10 14^'. lid. 

Chan. Ing. p.?fi., 12 Edward /, No. i^. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 157 

OTilUam le TBoteler De 2I1emme» 

-w- • • • 

I nQUlSltlOn made at Dunten on Saturday in the vigil of 
X St. Barnabas the Apostle, 12 Edward I [1284], before Sir 
John de Wotton, sheriff of Wilts, and John son of Thomas, steward 
of the New Forest, by the oath of John de Wodejand, Thomas le 
Chumherlayn, Stephen le Tot, Walter le Cunestable, Richard de la More, 
John de la More, John Agnel, Richard Triaccle, William de Uydinton, 
Robert de Aldredeston, Walter Thomas, and Nicholas Dimars, who 
say that 

William le Buttelir held nothing of the King nor of the Lady 
Alianore the Queen, his Consort, in the vill of Bresaghe, but he 
held as much as he held in the same vill in socage of Sir Thomas 
de St. Omer, paying therefor yearly to him and his heirs half a mark 
of silver. 

The said William held one croft of land of the King in the New 
Forest, paying therefor yearly 155-. bd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edivard I, No. 21. 



gioan, tofe of i^mnpljre^ De l3o]^uu. 

Extent of the manor of Wyntebournestoke, which was of 
Joan de Boun (called in the writ wife of Hianphry de Bonn), 
in CO. Wilts, made before the King's escheator on Thursday in the 
feast of St. Hilary, 12 Edward I [1284], by Johti le Chamberleyen, 
Richard de Stapeljord, John de Berwyk, Alan le Bo tiler, Simon le 
Franceys, Reginald de Drumare (?), William de Sthyrreffcston, John dc 
Harelestone, Reginald de Ely, Robert de Berwyk, Edmund Atercston (?), 
and Johft Liimbard, who say that 

The said Joan held nothing of the King in chief on the day 
that she died, but she held the said manor of Wynterbournestoke 
of Helena de la Suche, one of the heirs of Roger de Quimy, in co. 
Winton, by the service of one knight's fee, without homage and 
marriage. 

The capital messuage with the gardens and curtilages is worth 
by the year half a mark. There are in the demesne 100 acres of 
arable land, and each acre is worth bd., and 200 acres of arable 
land by the lesser hundred, each acre of which is worth by 
the year 4^.: sum £1 \6s. 8d. There are there 6 J acres of 
meadow, each acre whereof is worth i8(/. : sum gs. gd. The 



158 Wiltshire 

pasture for sheep is worth by the year one mark. The rent of 
assize there of the free tenants and customars at the feast of the 
Purification of the Blessed Mary is 785-. /\.d., and at the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist 78^. \d., with the rent of the mill, and at the 
feast of St. Michael 78^-. lod. : sum £iz $s. lod. There are there 
14 customars, each of whose works from the feast of St. John the 
Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael [are worth] for the said time 
3^. bd. : sum 49J. There are there 5 customars, each of whose 
works are worth for the said time z\d.'. sum 8^. c^d. The pleas 
and perquisites with the heriots and reliefs are worth by the year 
33i-, 4^. Sum, £zi ly. 

The said Joan died on Thursday in the feast of St. Katherine the 
Virgin, 12 Edward I [1283]; Hawysta, who was the wife of 
Baldewyn Wake, sister of the said Joan, is her next heir, and is of 
full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward I, No. 27. 



iHatilDa, txjife of iRicl^arti He amunnetrl. 

Extent of the manor of Kyseleygh, in co. Wilts, which was 
of Matilda, wife of Richard de Amundevyl, made before the 
King's escheator on Wednesday next after the Epiphany of the 
Lord, 12 Edward I [1284], by Roger de Bulkyntun, Alan de 
Mtirlun, Richard de Tunhyde, John Burel, John le Fronkelayn, William 
Sturdy, Henry Lende, Roger le Sancer, Richard Forestarius, William de 
Pastura, John, of the same, Peter de Prato, William le Cu, John \V}g, 
who say that 

The said Matilda held the said manor of Ky^d in dower, and 
that that manor is held of the King in chief paying to the castle of 
Dy vises los. by the year at the feast of St. Michael. 

The garden with the capital messuage is worth by the year half 
a mark. There are there in the demesne 808 acres of arable land, 
and each acre is worth bd. by the year and not more, because they 
were not measured by the reasonable perch, but by the works of 
the customars: sum ;^i5 \s. There are there certain parcels of 
meadow, and they are worth by the year £i. The several pasture is 
worth by the year £jf. There is there a certain wood, the pasture 
whereof is worth by the year i 3J-. 4^. The pannage is worth per 
annum 15^. The underwood there is worth by the yeax /^od. Also 
of rent of assize at the feast of St. Michael £() is. ^^d. ; and at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary £() bs. i^d. There are there 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 159 

20 customars, each of whom does works in Winter and Lent, which 
are worth if\d. And in meadows to be mown, hay to be raised and 
carried, corn to be reaped and carried, yj. zd.\ sum £1 los. lod. 
There are there 19 who are called acremen whose works and 
customs are worth by the year 4.1s. iihd. There are there u 
lundenars * who shall work on every Monday throughout the year 
except 3, and the work of each is worth i6^d.: sum 15^. i^d. 
Also the common pannage at the feast of St. Martin of the 
customars is worth by the year 8^. by estimation. The cherchetum 
of hens at the same feast is worth 7^. lo^d. Also the tallage 
of the customars about the feast of All Saints is worth £^. The 
pleas and perquisites of the said court with the advowson are worth 
per annum 40J. Sum, £6^ i^s. 6d. 

The said Matilda died on Saturday after the feast of St. Katherine 
the Virgin in the said year; Richard, son oi John called Alan^ is 
her next heir, but of his age the jurors are ignorant. 

Chan, Inq. p.m., 12 Edward I, No. 29. 



Clie ^M^zm of dD^onejstotoe. 

■•^- • • • 

I n(|lllSltlOn made on Friday next before the Nativity, 

X 13 {sic\ Edward I [1284], by "Sax John IVa/erand, knight, Philip 
de Gay, Roger de la Byry, Robert son of James, Roger Brian, Robert 
de Molendin\ Richard de Lech, Geoffrey de Mandevil., John Cocus de 
Hampton, Richard de Lente, Nicholas Cannel, and John k Nywe, who 
say that 

Roger le Writele had in Brodebluntesdon and Cheleworth one 
messuage, 6 virgates of land, one windmill, and 30^-. of yearly rent, 
and it is worth per annum, clear, looj. ; and he held the said 
tenement of Sir Adam de Stratton, paying therefor scutage when it 
shall arise as much as belongs to the fourth part of a knight's fee, 
and he shall do suit at the court of the said Adam de Stratt07i at 
Sevenhampton from 3 weeks to 3 weeks for the said tenement. 
The said Adam holds of the Lady Isabella, Countess of Albcriniirle, 
and the said Countess of the King in chief. And it is to the 
damage of the said Adam de Stratton if the King should grant to 
the Abbess of Godestowe to the value of the wards and escheats 
. ^document torn away\. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., ii Edward I, No. 82. 

* Lundinarium is a quarter of a virgate. 



1 60 Wiltshire 

%^z cO'JjeitiSJ of i^ubett De "^wu^ 

Writ dated nth July, 12 Edward I [1284]. ^ 

Inquisition of the ages of Margaret, Matilda, and Isabella^ 
daughters and heirs of Hubert Huse, made at Netheravene, 
in CO. Wilts, before * .... in co. Wilts, on Sunday next 
after the feast of St. Nicholas, 13 Edward i [1284], in the presence 
of .Mzr^ar^/ who was the wife of* .... hy Philip le Sa\^ser, 
John le Fermer, John de Derneford, Philip Fraunceys^ William Harman, 
Richard deSuthkote, Geoffrey Druweys,Ivo^' . . . . de Clench, William 
de Stokke, William Afalewayn, senior, Adam de Everley, William 
Baxman, John de Stocke, John atte Wodemull,* . . . de Ore, Robert 
de Everley, John Skilling, Alexander le Dun, Robert le Fot, Peter 
Lillebon, Bartholomew de Compton,2ind S* .... who say that 

The said Margaret, Matilda, and Isabella are the daughters and 
next heirs of the said Hubert Huse. 

The said Margaret was aged 1 8 years at the feast of the Nativity 

of St. John the Baptist, 12 Edward I [1284]; the said Matilda 

15 years at the Nativity of the Lord, 12 Edward I [1283] ; and the 

said Isabella 13 years at the feast of St. Nicholas the Bishop and 

Confessor* .... 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward I, No. 93. 



jHatiina, Daugliter of K^ubert i^u^ee* 

Writ dated 26th October, 13 Edward I [1285]. 

Extent made at Fylhelden in the vigil of the Passion of 
the Lord, 14 Edward I [1286], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Matilda, daughter of Hubert Husee, by John de 
Denford, William Ardmay, John Long, Henry Trussehan, Simon 
Salle, Robert Michel, Humphrey de Fihelden, Henry de Lymynton, 
Peter le Blak, Thomas Tolle, Alexander Doneys, and John Mayne, 
who say that 

The said Matilda held nothing of the King in chief on the day 
that she died, but she held all the tenements whereof she was 
seised of Henry, son of Henry Esturmy, of the inheritance of 
Margaret, his wife, elder daughter and heir formerly oi Hubert Husee, 

* Document torn away. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. i6i 

by the service of finding the third part of one man armed, and of 
one horse harnessed in the King's army in the time of war for the 
third part of the inheritance formerly of Hubert Husee. 

The said Matilda held in Fyhelden of the said Henry, one 
messuage not built, and it is worth by the year zs. There is there 
a certain free fishery, and it is worth by the year 4^. She held the 
third part of 2 parts of 2 water-mills, and it is worth per annum 
8j. c)\d. She held also 51 acres of arable land in the demesne, 
price of the acre \d. : sum 1 7^. M. There are there 3 acres of 
meadow, price of the acre zs. \ sum 6j. There is there a pasture 
in common of the town for 4 oxen, price per head ^d. : sum 20^. 
There is there pasture for 80 sheep, and it is worth per annun 3^. 4//. 
Sum, 39^. f:)\d. 

There are there 3 free tenants, and they pay by the year 14J. 8^. 
of yearly rent by equal portions. 

There are there 2 customars who hold 2 virgates of land in 
villeinage and pay by the year for their rents, services, and works 
24^. by equal portions. Sum, 24J. 

There are there 2 cottars, and they pay by the year y. at the same 
terms as above. Sum, 7,s. 

Also of a certtfine at view of frank-pledge 8^. lo^d. The pleas 
and perquisites are worth by the year i id. for her part. Sum, 9^. i o\d. 

The said Matilda held of the said Henry in Tidecombe 
one messuage, and it is worth by the year \id. She held there 
18 acres of arable land, price of the . acre \d.: sum 6^. Also 
one acre of wood, price of the acre bd. There is there a pasture, 
and it is worth \td. by the year. Sum, 5^. bd. 

There is there one free tenant, and he pays by the year 1 8^. at 
the feast of St. Michael. Sum, i8</. 

The said Matilda held in Corsleyghe of the said Henry one 
messuage, with a curtilage, and it is worth by the year is. There 
are there 14 acres of arable land, and the acre is worth by the year 
3^. : sum IS. td. There is there one free tenant, and he pays by 
the year id. at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. Sum, 41. M. 

Sum of the whole extent .... 

Margaret, wife of the said Henry Esturmy, who is of the age of 
24 years, and Isabella, daughter of the aforesaid Hubert Husee, who 
is aged 14 years, sisters of the said Matilda, are her next heirs. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 13 Edward I, No. 17. 



WILTS INQ. — VOL. II. 

1 2 



1 62 Wiltshire 



I nCJUlSltlOn made on Wednesday next before the Puri- 
A fication of the Blessed Mary, 13 Edward I [1285], before 
Sir /. de Wo/fon, sheriff of Wilts, as to what lands and tenements 
Richard Sierre holds in the manor of Marleberg, and the value of 
them, by the oath of Roger de Stutescumbe, Thomas de Kenete, John 
de Berewik, William Crespin, John de la Mere, Hamon Virgil, German 
le Chaundeler, John de Bosco, John de Evesbur, Nicholas le Bolde, 
William Ruffy, and Robert de Chadindon, who say that 

The said Richard holds in the barton within the manor of Marle- 
berg one messuage and half a virgate of land freely for ^s. by the 
year and suit at court, and for carriage of hay with his cart for one 
day, and for one day to carry the corn in the Autumn, and the 
carriage is worth by the year td. The said Richard holds in the 
said barton half a virgate of land like the other customars, and he 
ought for the said land to work from the feast of St. Michael up 
to the Nativity of St. John the Baptist each week for 3 days up to 
the third hour, unless a feast shall intervene, and he shall take 
nothing, and that work is worth for the said time 4i-. id. And he 
ought to work from the said feast of St. John up to the feast of 
St. Michael each week for 5 days up to the third hour, unless 
a feast shall intervene, and the work is worth for the said time 
2S. Sd. And he ought to take in the Autumn the twentieth sheaf, 
therefore he is put for the higher price. And he shall give by the 
year 3 hens and one cock for cherchetum, and they are worth 4</. 
Sum of the value of this half-virgate of land containing everything, 
7 J. id. 

Sum of the whole value of both l_ulrit^que^ half-virgates of land 
by the year to the use of the King as in rents and all other services, 
lis. "jd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 13 Edward I, No. 27. 



T" • • • 

I nOlllSltlOn made upon the liberties which were used by 

X Henry de Candever in his time, before J. de JVu/lon, sheriff of 

Wilts, and Thomas le Rus, at Netherhaven, on Sunday next after 

the feast of St. Giles the Abbot, 13 Edward I [1285J, by Simon de 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 163 

JLittlekotf Richard de la Folie, Richard de Chusingebyr\ Peter de la 
Hulk, Henry de Wike, John Laur\ John Beumund, Symon the Clerk, 
John Mandeware, John Galant, Richard de Rykingeh\ and John 
Godenave, who say that 

Henry de Candevre had his free court for his free tenants and 
others in the vill of Fytelton, and his amercements of the same 
men, and the emends of bread and ale, and he had "cumling," 
and was quit of toll, he and his men, wheresoever in the power of 
the King, and sheriff's aid and murder and flight of robbery. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 13 Edward I, No. 59. 



l^enrj) Lac^, c^atl oC Lincoln* 

~W • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Honynton on Thursday in the vigil 
X of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 13 Edward I [1285], 
before the Sheriff, whether it be to the damage of the King if he 
should grant to Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, that he may give 
and assign to Nicholas de Si. Quinton, for the Church of St. Edmund 
of Sarum and the chaplains serving God there, one messuage and 
one carucate of land in Honynton, to hold to them and their 
successors or not, by the oath of Thomas le Chamberleng, Walter 
atte Brigh, John Martin, Elias de Gildejord, Peter le Fol, Alexander 
de Remesbury, John ate More, Walter Maryot, John Thomas, Roger 
Gille, Ralph de Bosco, and Geoffrey Cancepey, who say that 

Two free tenants of the said Earl owe suit at the King's hundred 
•of Cauden every three weeks, and that the villeins of the same 
owe suit at the sheriff's tourn twice in the year, and they give at 
the sheriff's tourn by the year izd. The assize of bread and ale 
broken is worth izd. That messuage and land are worth per 
annum, clear, \oos., and are of the fee of the Earl of Lincoln, and 
are held of the same for half a knight's fee, making to the said 
Earl scutage, as much as belongs to half a knight's fee. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 13 Edward I, No. 91. 



Clje abbot of iHalmejsbut:^. 

T • • » 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Chippeham on Saturday next before 

X the feast of the Nativity of the Lord, 14 Edward I [1285], 

before Sir John de Wotton, sheriff of Wilts, by the oath of Robert 



1 64 Wiltshire 

Kaynei, Robert de Thurleby^ John de Burle, Adam Harding, Johr 
Kaylewy, John de Bampton, Jordan del Ewe, Henry Vigorus, Roger de 
Pekynghull, Richard de Sterkele, Alexander de Somerjord, and Richard 
de la Lee, to enquire if it would be to the damage of the King or 
others if the King should grant to Geoffrey de Fynemore that he may 
give one virgate of land in la Blakelond, and to Richard de Kernel, 
clerk, that he may give 2 virgates of land in Kernel, to John de Esion 
that he may give one virgate of land in Wynckeworth, and to 
Richard Pinnok of Boruhton [Bourton ? now Burton Hill] that he 
may give 20 acres of land in Coufaud, to Roger de Evesham that 
he may give 16 acres of land in Alynton, and io John de Slahirejord 
thaf he may give 8 acres of land in Alynton to the Abbot and 
Convent of Malmesbur', who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the said King 
should grant to Geoffrey de Fynemore that he may give one virgate 
of land in la Blakelond to the said Abbot and Convent, because 
the said virgate is held of the said Abbot without mesne by the 
service of one mark, to be paid yearly to the said Abbot, and 
beyond the said rent the said virgate is worth, clear, zs. ; and to 
Richard de Kernel, clerk, that he may give the said 2 virgates of 
land in Kemel, because he holds them of the said Abbot without 
mesne, by the service of yj., and they are worth, clear, besides the 
said rent, 4J. ; and to John de Eston that he may give one virgate 
of land in Wynckeworth, because it is held of the said Abbot 
without mesne by the service of \zd., and it is worth, clear, besides 
the said rent, one mark ; and to Richard Pinnok, of Boruhton, that 
he may give 20 acres of land in Coufaud, because he holds the 
same of the said Abbot without mesne, by the service of \M., and 
they are worth, clear, besides the said rent, 3^. ; and to Roger de 
Evesham that he may give 16 acres of land in Alynton, because he 
holds the same of the said Abbot without mesne, by the service of 
i\d., a:nd they are worth, clear, besides the said rent, zs. ; and to 
John de Slahtrejord that he may give 8 acres of land in Alynton, 
because he holds the same of the said Abbot without mesne, by 
the service of 3i</., and they are worth, clear, besides the said rent, 
\id. The said Abbot holds all the said lands and tenements of 
the King in chief. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 13 Edward I, No. 121. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 165 



abbot of ^tanlegl^* 

-w- • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Stodlegh, in the forest of Chippe- 
JL ham, on Monday next before the feast of the Holy Virgins 
Perpetua and Felicitatis, 13 Edward I [1285], before Roger Extraneo^ 
justice of the forest, by Walter Horn, constable of the castle of 
Devises, Geoffrey de Middelton, forester on horseback of the said 
forest, Geoffrey de la Berse, Philip de Kingeswod, William de Clenche, 
Alexander de Woluemere, William le Sage, and Robert de la Coufaude, 
foresters on foot, Richard Horn, Adam Harding, and Peter de 
Baldenham, verderers of both the forests of Melkesham and 
•Chyppeham, Robert Kaynd \Kaynel\ John Kaylewey, Roger Bubbe, 
Geoffrey de Finemore, Walter de Aula, Nicholas le Blund, Roger le Gras, 
Roger de Schawe, William Osseward, and Roger de Lileshulle, regarders 
of the same forests, with Walter de Snape and Robert le Blund, of 
Nattone, joined with them, Gilbert de la Roche, agister, Laurence de 
Stondlegh, William Norman of the same, William de Calne, William. 
-Weylond of the same, Richard le Felawe, John de Burle of Chippe- 
ham, Geoffrey de* Cocham \J2osham'\ of the same, Hugh Pig of the 
same, Henry Andren of the same, John Selje of Sende, Thomas Self 
of the same, Robert le Blund of Bromham, if it be to the damage 
of the King, or of his forest of Chippeham, or of others, if he 
should grant to the Abbot of Stanlegh and the Convent that they 
may enclose a certain wood of theirs near their abbey which is 
called la More, and is within the metes of the said forest, with a 
small ditch and a low hedge, so that his wild beasts may freely 
enter and leave the said wood, and may hold that wood so enclosed 
to him and his successors for ever or not. 

All the jurors say that it is not to the damage of the King, or 
to the hurt of his forest of Chippeham, if he should grant to the 
said Abbot and Convent of Stanlegh that they may enclose their 
said wood with a small ditch and a low hedge, so that his wild 
beasts may freely enter and leave the said wood, and may hold the 
same so enclosed, but it will be to the greater commodity of the 
King and his forest, because if it be enclosed in the manner afore- 
said the pasture that now is fed upon by their beasts will be better 
kept, and will be worth more for the wild beasts of the King. 
Nevertheless, it is to the damage of others, to wit, the men of the 
manor of Chippeham, who have common for their beasts in the 
said wood. 
I 2 * Chan. Inq. p.m., \^ Edward I, No. 132. 



1 66 Wiltshire 

milliam jfrauncet^* 

Extent of the lands" ^nd tenements in co, Wilts which 
were of William Fraunceys, made on Friday next after the 
feast of St. Peter called ad Vincula, 14 Edward I [1286], by the 
oath of Alan de Lange/ord, Edmund . . . , John U Prute, 
Hugh Russet, Hugh Syreman, Marlin le Cuminer, John Hoy, Robert 
Herber, . . . Rycher, John the clerk of Wyly, William de 
Luttecote, and Edmund de Vtmo, who say that 

William Fraunceys held in Fissereton next Sarum 3 messuages 
and one virgate of land of . . . rand in socage, by the service 
of 13J. 4</. by the year, and to Henry son o( Auger is. only. 

Robert, son of the said William, is his next heir, and is aged 
II years. 

The said 3 messuages are worth by the year yj, "/d. 

There are there 20 acres of arable land, price of the acre iid. : 
sum 20s. Also 3 acres of meadow, price of the acre 2s. : sum 7^. 
Sum, 34^^. jd. 

■ The said William held one mansion in the said vill of Fisserton 
of Sir Henry, son oi Auger, and it is worth per annum . . . 

The said William held 6 "sendas" in the said vill of the said 
Henry, son of Auger, by the service of 3^-., and he owes suit weekly. 
The said " sendas" are worth by the year 6j. : sum %s. 

Sum of the whole extent, \is. id. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 14 Edivani I, No. 5. 



E 



aSegmalD ^on of i^eten 

Xtent of the manor of Stantone, in co. Wilts, which was 
of Reginald son of Peter, made on Monday next after the 
feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 14 Edward I [1286], by the oath 
of Roger Attebury, John Cocus, Adam de la Penne, Elias de Mandevile, 
James de la More, Richard son of Hugh, James de Grundewell, Henry 
Ernald, Robert Long, Walter Clerk, Walter Remund, and William de 
Ponte, who say that 

The said Reginald held the said manor of Stantone of the King 
in chief by the service of the constabulary in the army of the 
King for his parcenary. 

The said Reginald was patron of the Church of Stantone, and it 
is worth by the year 20 marks. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 167 

John, son of the said Reginald, is his next heir, and is aged 
30 years. , 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the year 
6j. %d. There are there in the demesne 176 acres of arable land, 
price of the acre %d.'. sum wjs. \d. Also 20 acres of meadow, 
price of the acre \bd.\ sum 26J. %d. There is there pasture for 
20 oxen in the common, price per head td. : sum los. Sum of the 
whole demesne, £S os. 8d. 

There are there free tenants who pay by the year 26s. at the 
four principal terms by equal portions. The rent of assize of the 
customars by the year who hold 12 virgates of land at the feast of 
St. Michael is ijs. 6d., and at Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer 
at each term i^s. bd.: sum 58^. There are there 4 cottars who 
pay 3^. 6d. at the said four terms. The rent of hens at the feast 
of St. Martin is 2s. id. The ploughing of the customars and the 
harrowing at the feast of St. Martin s^- ^^- The harrowing at 
the Lent sowing 18^. The ploughing of customars in the morrow 
of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 4^. The works and customs 
of the said customars are worth per annum ^^.Ss. 3^^. The pleas 
and perquisites of the court, with the fines of lands, reliefs, and 
heriots, are worth per annum los. Sum of the rent and works, 
£"] iSs. io\d. 

Sum of the whole extent of Stantone, ^15 igs. 6^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 14 Edward I, No. 18. 



aseginalD 0on of i^ttzx. 

Extent of the manor of Churiton, in co. Wilts, which was of 
Reginald son of Peler, made on Saturday next after the feast 
of St. Barnabas, 14 Edward I [1286], by the oath of Thomas le 
Heyre, John Beynin, Nicholas de Paieni, John de Molendin', Richard 
Beynin, Simon North, Roger de Caninges, Simon le Tayllor, John 
Hueman, William Faber, Isaac Cosin, and John Agath^ who say that 

The said Reginald held the said manor of Churiton of the King 
in chief, by the service of the fifth part of one knight's fee. John, 
son of the said Reginald, is his next heir, and is aged 30 years. 

The capital messuage with the croft is worth by the year 4^. 
There are there 129 acres of land as they lie by the lesser hundred, 
price of the acre i\d. : sum 59^. \\d. There are there 6 acres of 
meadow, price of the acre 2 j. : sum i is. There is there in the 
common of the vill pasture for 16 oxen, price per head id. : sum 



1 68 Wiltshire 

i6d. There is there a several pasture and common for 200 sheep, 
price per head id. by the year: sum 16s. %d. Sum of the whole 
demesne, £/^ \y. i^d. 

There is there one free tenant who pays by the year 6s. Sd. at the 
four principal terms of the year by equal portions. The rent of assize 
of the customars who hold 3^ virgates of land is by the year 35^. at 
three terms of the year, viz., at the Nativity of the Lord, the Annun- 
ciation of Our Lady, and the feast of St. John the Baptist, by equal 
portions. There are there 2 cottars who pay by the year at the 
said three terms 6d. proportionately. The works and customs of the 
said customars are worth by the year iis. Sd. The pleas and 
perquisites of the court, with the fines of lands, reliefs, and heriots, 
are worth by the year 3^. The tallage of the villeins is worth by 
the year 6s. 8d. in the feast of St. Michael. There is there one 
cottar who pays by the year at the four principal terms izd. pro- 
portionately. Sum, 64J. 6d. 

Sum of the whole extent of the manor of Churiton, £■] lys. "j^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 14 Edward I, No. 18. 



Fees held of Sir /. de Moun, in co. Wilts. 

The heirs of William de Corsligh hold of the said deceased the 
fifth part of one knight's fee in Parva Corslighe, and it is extended 
at 20s. 

John de Kinneston holds of the said deceased one fee in Sutton, 
and it is extended at looj. 

The heirs of William de Regny hold of the said deceased half 
a fee in Burbach, and it is extended at 50J. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 14 Edward /, No. 23. 



F 



XtCn t of the manor of Elecumbe, in co. Wilts, which was 



A J of John Lovel, made on Friday next after the feast of 
St. Dionisius, 15 Edward I [1287], by the oath of William Paris, 
John Rothel, Henry Frankleyn, John Stolaz, Roger Bernard, William 
Bryan, Henry de Okeburn, William de Meroles, Nicholas de Insula 
Robert Balle, and Adam le Someter, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 169 

The said John Lovel held the said manor of Elecumbe of the 
heirs of Roger de Quincy, formerly Earl of JVyn/on, by the service of 
half a knight's fee. 

/okn Lovel, son of the said John^ is his next heir, and is aged 
30 years. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the year 1 3^. 4^. 
There are there in the demesne 140 acres of arable land, price of 
the acre \d. : sum 46^. 8^. Also 16 acres of meadow, price of the 
acre \zd.\ sum i6j. There is there pasture in common for 50 
oxen, price per head 4^. : sum i bs. 8d. There is there a several 
pasture in Blagrave, and it is worth by the year 6^-. Sd. There is 
there a windmill, and it is worth per annum 6s. Sd. The rent of 
the freemen by the year is loi-. id. at the four principal terms of the 
years, by equal portions. Also i lb. of cummin at the feast of 
St. Michael, price id. The rent of 13 customars and 19 cottars, 
who hold 1 3 virgates of land, is 23^. by the year at the four principal 
terms of the year, by equal portions. • The rent of hens at the feast 
of St. Martin is worth by the year Ss. ^d. The pannage of the pigs 
at the feast of St. Martin is worth per annum 6d. The rent of eggs 
at Easter is 4^. The works and customs of the said customars are 
worth by the year £() 6s. The pleas and perquisites of the court, 
with the fines and reliefs, are worth by the year 6s. Sd. 

Sum of the whole extent, £i-j is. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 15 Edward I, No. 11. 



gioan CPajselin- 

Extent of the manor of Chiverel, in co. Wilts, which was of 
Joan de Gaselin, deceased, made on Sunday next after the 
feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, 15 Edward I [1287], by the oath 
of Richard Enoc, William Gule, Richard le Blunt, Stephen Colin, 
John de Wodebrigge, William Carpentar, William the Clerk, Thomas 
Dalle, Geoffrey Maurice, Thomas Culle, William de Hale, and Ralph 
de Sanjord, who say that 

The said Joan held the said manor of Chiverel of Sir Walter 
de Baton in chief by the service of one knight's fee. 

Edmund, son of the said Joan, is her next heir, and is aged 
30 years. 

The capital messuage with the garden and dovecote is worth 
clear by the year is. There are there in the demesne 300 acres of 



1 1 Wiltshire 

arable land by the lesser hundred, price of the acre bd. : sum £-j \os. 
Also 20 acres of meadow, price of the acre \%d. : sum -^os. There 
is there pasture for 36 oxen, price per head bd. : sum iSj. There 
is there a several pasture for 5 plough horses Sjiffr'^ price per head 
%d. : sum 3^. 4^. There is there a several pasture for 300 sheep 
and a half, price per head \d. : sum 29^. 2d. There is there one 
free tenant who pays at Easter i lb. of pepper, and it is worth 
by the year 6d. Also one free tenant who pays by the year ^ lb. of 
cummin, and it is worth ^d. There are there 2 free tenants who 
pay by the year at Easter 2d. There is there one free tenant 
who pays i lb. of cummin at Easter, and it is worth id. The rent 
of 8 customars who hold 4 virgates of land by the year at the feast 
of St. Michael is 8s. The rent of hens at the feast of St. Martin 
by the year is worth 2s. Sd. The works and customs of the said 
customars by the year are worth 49^. The pleas and perquisites of 
the halmote, with reliefs and heriots, are worth per annum 2s. 
Sum of the whole extent, £14. i^s. ^^d. 

Chan. Ing.p.m., 15 Edward I, No. 22. 



31oan m^tlin. 

Extent of the manor of Shuldone, in co. Wilts, which was 
oi Joan Gaselm, deceased, made on Saturday next after the 
feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, 15 Edward I [1287], by the oath 
of Henry William, Waller William, John de Burleye, Walter de Porta, 
Humphrey Payen, Henry le Marchant, Robert Osgod, John Bulbe, 
Hugh Pig, Richard Marescall, John Elie, and William Durant, who 
say that 

The said Joan Gaselin held the said manor of Shuldene of the 
King in chief by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. 

Edmund, son of the said Joan, is her next heir, and is aged 
30 years. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the year, 
clear, i^s. [.?]. There is there one dovecote, and it is worth by 
the year 25-. There are there in the demesne 200 acres of arable 
land, price of the acre id. : sum 50J. Also 20 acres of meadow^ 
price of the acre 18^.: sum 30J. There is there a pasture in 
common, and it is worth per annum 13^. ^d. The rent of the 
freemen by the year is 73^. 5^., viz., at the Annunciation 34-r. 2^d., 
and at the feast of St. Michael 39T. 2id. There are there 3 cottars 
who hold 2 virgates of land, and who pay at the four principal 
terms of the year $os. gd. by equal portions. The rent of hens 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 171 

at the feast of St. Martin is i rd. The rent of foldgabel at Hockday 
is 3^. The works and customs of the said customars are worth 
per annum 7^. The pleas and perquisites of the hundred of 
Chipham, with the pleas and perquisites of the borough of Chipham, 
are worth per annum ^\, because Nicholas de la Hiisee has the 
third part of the pleas and perquisites of the hundred. The toll 
of the market is worth by the year looi-. The pleas and per- 
quisites of the halmote of Shuldon, with the fines of lands, reliefs, 
and heriots, are worth \s. There is there of rent i lb. of cummin 
and I lb. of pepper, and they are worth -[d. by the year- 
Sum of the whole extent of Shuldone, £\<^ \%s. id. 



The said Joan held one hamlet of Lolleden of Sir William de 
Valence in chief by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. 
The capital messuage with the garden and dovecote is worth by 
the year, clear, los. There are there in the demesne 180 acres of 
arable land, price of the acre ^d.: sum 455. Also 10 acres of 
meadow, price of the acre i8</. : sum 15^^. There is there a several 
pasture, and it is worth by the year 5^. There is there pasture for 
8 oxen in common-, and it is worth per annum idd. There is there 
a certain wood in the forest, and it is not extended. The rent of 
the freemen by the year is bs. id. at four terms, viz., at Lady Day, 
St. Michael, Christmas, and Midsummer, by equal portions. There 
is there one free tenant who pays per annum at two terms, viz., 
St. Martifi and Hockday, los. 4^. by equal portions. There are 
there 14 customars who hold 4 virgates of land, who pay by the 
year £4r 9s. Sd. at the four principal terms of the year by equal 
portions. The rent of hens at the feast of St. Martin is 2^. Fold- 
gabel at Hockday, ^s. The works and customs of the said customars 
are worth by the year $s. 5<f. There is there of rent at the feast of 
St. Michael 2 lbs. of pepper, and they are worth i2d. The pleas 
and perquisites of the halmote, with fines of lands and reliefs, are 
worth by the year 2s. 

Sum of the extent of Lolleden, £() i6s. 1 id. 



The said /oan held in Budeston among the tenants of Sir Robert 
Burnel in free socage 18 marks worth by the rent of is. 8d., by the 
service of 20 marks by the year, and it is not extended, because 
the reprises exceed the receipt. 

Sum of both extents, £29 i^s. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 15 Edward I, No. 22, 



1/2 Wilts kire 

Ed W3,rCl by the grace of God, etc., to his beloved John de 
Wotton, Robert de Vernun, Peter de Skidenor, and Richard Pig, 
greeting. We, willing to be certified of the state of our castle and 
manor of Devizes, and of our park there, and of our forests of 
Chippenham and Melkesham, to wit, in what state Ralph de 
Sandwico, late constable of our said castle, delivered up the said 
castle and manor as in munitions and other dead furniture [in 
armatur' et alia mortua garnestura\ and the said park and forests 
as in vert and venison, to Matthew son of John, to whom we 
granted the said manor, park, and forests, for his whole life, and 
in what state the said Matthew received the same, have assigned 
you to look fully into the matter, etc., etc. 

Witness Edmund Earl of Cornwall, our kinsman, at Westminster, 
4th July, in the 15th year of our reign [1287]. 



On Saturday in the vigil of St. Margaret the Virgin, 
15 Edward I [1287], view was had of the Castle of Devizes, 
with the parks, the manor of Roudes, and with the forests of 
Melkesham and Chippeham belonging to the said castle, hy John 
de Wotton, then sheriff of Wilts, Robert de Vernon, Peter de Eskydemor, 
knights, and Richard Pyg, and also by the view of the verderers, 
foresters, and other ministers of the said forests, who witness that 
the said castle with the houses therein, and the park with the said 
forests, and with the said manor, and also the wild beasts in the 
said park and forests, with the vert and venison, were well kept 
on the day of St. Petronilla the Virgin, viz., in the vigil of Holy 
Trinity in the said year, on which day the said Ralph delivered all 
.the same to Sir Matthew, son ol John. Moreover, the said Matthew 
received the things underwritten from the said Ralph in the said 
castle, viz., 22 balists with the whole tackle, and with 3 baldreds, 
100 quarels, 5 chains of iron, one pair of manicles which is called 
"grym," 3 large cords, one brazier (.?) \_cynera'\ bound with iron, 
one iron which is called Cornaylle, 36 keys for divers doors of the 
castle, one lock for the door of the prison of the outer gate, 2 buckets 
bound with iron to draw the water, 2 verms, 6 ladders, and one 
vestment worn and old, and with one bell from the old chapel of 
the King, and with one pile of chalk in which is contained 200 
quarters of chalk. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 173 

In witness whereof as well the said John de Wotton and his fellows, 
as the verderers of the said forest, viz., Peter de Baldenham, Peter 
Horn, Adam Hardyng, and Roger le Gras, have put to their seals. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 15 Edzvard I^ No. 39. 



Inquisition made before /. de Wotton, sheriff of Wilts, 
at Tyssebury, on Saturday in the morrow of the Decollation 
of St. John the Baptist, 15 Edwar'd I [1287], by the oath of Sir 
John de Perham, Hamon de Hacch, William de Brydeserd, John le 
Gentyl, John de Ahsjold, Walter de Oclee, William le Peek, William 
le Tayllur, Henry Lhus, John Olyver, William Borhog, and Giles de 
Hynedon, whether it be to the damage of the King or others if the 
King should grant to Richard de Mannestone that he may give to the 
Abbess and Convent of Schafton one messuage and 2 carucates of 
land in Donheved, to hold to them and their successors for ever, 
who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others because the said 
Richard holds the said messuage and land immediately of the said 
Abbess by the service of 40J. by the year, and doing suit at the 
court of the said Abbess every three weeks, and attending twice at 
the lagheday of the said Abbess in Donheved. The said messuage 
and land are worth per annum, clear, £b. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 15 Edivard I, No. 42. 
\J2han. Inq. p.m., 15 Edward J No. 57, is a duplicate of the above.] 



giol^n ne dB^rim^tene. 

EXtGnt of the lands and tenements which were of John de 
Grymestede on the day that he died, made at Grimstede on 
Sunday next after the feast of St. Martin, 16 Edward I [1288], 
by the oath o{ John de Grymstedene, Robert Walrand, John the Clerk, 
John Hulun, William Arnold, John le Prute, Adam le Frankelayn, 
Michael Baldat, Philip de Lusteshall, Walter Conestable, Robert de 
Aldredeston, and William de la Hegg, who say that 

The saidyb^« oj Grymsteden held the said manor of Grymsteden 
of the King in chief by the service of two parts of one knight's fee. 



1 74 Wiltshire 

Andrew, son of the said John, is his next heir, and is aged 
40 years. 

The said John was patron of the Church of Westgrymsteden, and 
it is worth by the year 12 marks. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the year, clear, 
13 J. 4(/. There are there in the demesne 194 acres of arable land 
by the lesser hundred, price of the acre ^d. : sum 48^. bd. Also 
37 acres of meadow, price of the acre is. : sum 745-. There is 
there a several pasture for 16 oxen, price per head ^d. : sum 45-. 
The pasture for sheep in common is not extended, because it is 
poor [debifl. There are there 2 groves containing 16 acres, and 
they are worth per annum, clear, 4?., because there is no under- 
wood. There is there one wood containing 21 acres, and it is 
■worth by the year as to pasture in the Summer and other easements 
1 3 J. 4</. The rent of the freemen by the year at the four principal 
terms is 8j. id. by equal portions. There are there 8 customars, 
€ach of whom holds 10 acres of land, and each of whom pays at 
the said four terms 3^. for each portion : sum 24J. The rent of hens 
at the feast of St. Martin, 2^. ?,d. The pannage of pigs at the feast 
of St. Martin is worth by the year bd. The works and customs of 
the said customars are worth by the year \s. zd., as in harrowing, 
weeding, mowing, and reaping the corn. The rent of the cottars 
by the year is 1 3J. ^\d. at the said four terms, by equal portions. 
There are at Alwardesbur* and Farnl' 8 tenants who pay by the 
year 20J. 4^. at the said terms by equal portions. The rent of hens 
at the feast of St. Martin is 2s. per annum. The works and 
customs of the same are worth by the year \s. bd. The pleas 
and perquisites of the court, with reliefs and fines, are worth by the 
year los. Sum of the extent, £iz bs. g^d. 

The said John held 60 acres of land in Estgrymstede of the heirs 
of Walter Walrand by the service ol $s. id., price of the acre id. : 
sum 10s. He also held 4 acres of meadow there, price of the 
acre i zd. : sum 4J. There are there 5 tenants who pay by the year 
20s. for all things at the said four terms. Sum, 34^. 

The said John held the manor of Alvedeston, in co. Wilts, of 
the Abbess of Wilton at fee farm by the service of 100s. The said 
John is patron of the Chapel of Alvedeston, and it is worth by the 
year los. There are there in the demesne 80 acres of arable land, 
price of the acre 3^/. : sum 205-. There are there 20 acres of wood 
within the regard of the forest, and they are worth per annum, 
clear, zs. The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the 
year 4?. The rent of the freemen by the year at the feast of 
St. Michael, 7^. id. The pasture for oxen and sheep is not extended, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 175 

because there is none. The pleas and perquisites by the year, 
with reliefs and heriots, are worth per annum zs. Sum, 35^. id. 

The said John held in Bymerton and Quidhampton 2 virgates of 
arable land in the demesne, containing 48 acres of land, price 
of the acre td. : sum 24J. The rent of the freemen by the year 
at the said four terms i\d., and ilb. of pepper at the feast of 
St. Michael, price 3^. The rent of the customars by the year at 
the said four terms is 21^. ^\d. The rent of hens per annum at 
the feast of St. Martin is 2J. The rent of the cottars per annum 
at the said four terms is 13J. 6^. The pleas and perquisites of the 
court, with the fines of lands, \os. And be it known that the said 
John held the said tenements in Bymerton and Quidhampton of 
Hugh Chamherlayn in chief by the service of the tenth part of a 
knight's fee. Sum, 71J. M. 

The saidy<?A« de Grymsiedene held the bailiwick of keeping the 
park of Mulchet, taking thereof all the issues, saving to the King 
vert and venison and pannage exceeding 6^-. M., of the King by 
the service of 40J. of fee farm yearly, to be paid to the King by the 
hands of the bailiff of Clarynden, and it is worth by the year bs. Sd. 
Sum, 6s. Sd. 

Sum of the whole extent of all the lands and tenements aforesaid, 
£ig 14J. 2^d. 

Chan. Ing.p.m., 16 Edward I, No. 28. 



asobert iHautiut* 

Extent of the manor of Fontel, in co. Wilts, which was of 
Rohert Maudut, made 15th April, 16 Edward I [1288], by 
the oath of Stephen Droys, Philip Strug, James de Troive, knights, 
Thomas Chamberleyng, John Keyn, Robert le Fot, William le Dun, 
William le Pek, William de Brydeserd, Walter de Ode, Roger de Colingge- 
burn, and Richard de Langeport, who say that 

The said Robert Maudut held nothing of the King on the day 
that he died, but he held the said manor of Fontel oi John Maudut 
in chief by the service of i lb. of cummin. 

John, son of the said Robert, is his next heir, and is aged 7 years. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth by the year, clear, 
5 J. There are there in the demesne 120 acres of arable land, 
price of the acre 3^. : sum 303-. There is there i^ acres of meadow, 
price of the acre zs. : sum 3^. There is there a pasture in common 
for 8 oxen, price per head 2d. : sum i6d. Also a pasture in 



176 Wiltshire 

common for 100 sheep, price of the hundred zs. There is there 
a certain wood which contains 20 acres, and it is worth per annum, 
clear, 6j. %d. There is there one customar who holds half a virgate 
of land, and pays by the year at the Purification of the Blessed 
Mary, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and the feast of 
St. Michael, zs. bd. by equal portions. There are there 2 cottars, 
and they pay by the year zs. at the said three terms. The works 
and customs of the said customars are worth by the year y. The 
pleas and perquisites of the courts, with the fines of lands, are 
worth by the year izd. 

The said Robert held 8 acres of^arable land oi Robert de Hachche 
by the service of \zd., and they are worth by the year izd. 

Sum of the whole extent, 57^. td. 



Extent of the manor of Sutton in the said county made on the 
day aforesaid by the jurors aforesaid, who say that the said Robert 
held nothing of the King on the day that he died, but that he held 
the said manor of Sutton o{ John Maudut in chief by the service of 
the said pound of cummin. The capital messuage with a certain 
troft is worth by the year zs. There are there in the demesne 
100 acres of arable land, price of the acre 4^. : sum 33J. 4^. Also- 
3 pieces of meadow, and they are worth by the year 3^. There is 
there a pasture in common for 8 oxen, price per head ^d. : sum zs. 
Also a pasture for 100 sheep, price of the hundred zs. There is 
there a certain wood which- contains 4 acres, and it is worth per 
annum, clear, zs. There are there two free tenants who pay by 
the year at the said three terms 8j. 5</. by equal portions. There 
are there 3 free tenants who pay by the year at the said terms ts. bd. 
The works and customs of the said customars are worth by the 
year zs. Sd. as in cherchet and harrowing [?]. The pleas and 
perquisites of the court, with fines of lands and heriots, are worth 
per annum zs. Sum of the extent, £^ i^s. 6d. 

Sum of both the extents, £-j \^s. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 16 Edtvard I, Noi, 30. 



C]^oma0 ^ttoarD* 



InOUlSltlOn made of the lands and tenements of Thomas 
Syvoard and Agatha his wife, and William Syward and Agnes 
his wife, on Tuesday next after Palm Sunday, 17 Edward I [1289], 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 177 

in the full county of Wilton, before /. it Wotton, sheriff, by the oath 
of Michael Baldet, Peter le Blake of Chaldrington, Thomas Tolle of 
Aldington, William de Draycoie, William le Frye of Childrington, 
John Messor of Nyweton, William Elys of the same, Alexander 
Deones of Aldington, Waller Hardy of Wynterslewe, Richard 
Godwyne, Stephen Ewyas, and John Cesse, who say that 

The said Thomas Syward and Agatha his wife, and William 
Syward and Agnes his wife, hold one tenement, which is worth by 
the year 2s., and 24 acres of arable land, which- are worth by the 
year 8j., and they give therefore to the King by the year by the 
name of serjeanty 40^/., and they gave to the escheator therefore 
ts. for the wardship of the said Agatha and Agnes, which they had 
had for two years. 

Given at Wilton the said day and year. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 17 Edward I, No. 41. 



Pleas before Salom' de Roff' and his fellows, justices in eyre at 
Wilton, in co. Wilts, in the morrow of St. Hilary, 17 Edward I 

[1289]. 

Trie jurors of the hundred of Aumbrebery present that 
Robert Herberd, who is dead, held half a virgate of land in 
Wyntereslowe, which is worth by the year 20^., in chief of the 
King. And Agatha and Agnes, daughters and heirs of the said 
Robert, were within age in the time of Hildebrond de London, 
formerly sheriff, and are now married to William Syward and 
Thomas Syward, by what warrant they do not know. Therefore 
it is commanded to the sheriff to cause the said William and 
Thomas to come, but afterwards they did not come, and the sheriff 
witnesses that the said William was attached by John Nesse and 
Walter Hardy, therefore he is in mercy. And the said Thomas 
was attached by Richard Todwyne and John Nesse, therefore he is 
in mercy. Afterwards the said William and Thomas Syward came 
and acknowledged that the said Agnes and Agatha were married 
to them. And because they do not show any licence of the King 
for the said marriage, let the said tenement be taken into the hand 
of the King, so that the sheriff may answer for the issues until, etc. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 17 Edward I, No. 41. 



WILTS INQ. — VOL. 11. 

1 3 



178 Wiltshire 

Cl^e X^tit of m^gan De Cl^ereburg]^* 

Edward^ by the grace of God, etc., io John de Haverynge. 

Wil6rC3,S we took into our hands the lands and tenements 
which were of Wygan de Chereburg, who held of us in 
chief after the death of the said JVygan, now /ohn, son of the said 
Wygan, whom he had by Ellen, daughter of Philip de la Leye, and 
who was married at Effingham, in co. Surrey, as it is said, comes 
and prays that the said lands and tenements may be given to him 
as the son and next heir of the said Wygan ; and also a certain 
John, son of the said Wigan, whom he had by Cristiana de Chedde- 
worth, who was married at Cheddeworth, in co. Gloucester, as it is 
said, afterwards came into our said court before us, and prayed 
that the said lands and tenements might be given to him as son 
and next heir of the said Wygan. As it is not clear to us which 
of them is the next heir, and not wishing to injure them in this 
behalf, we command you by the oal.; of lawful men of the view of 
Shende diligently to inquire who .; the next heir of the said 
Wygan. 

Witness R. de Hengham, at Carnarvon, 6th May, 12 Edward I 
[1284]. 

Chan. Inn. p.m., 12 Edward /, No. 99. 



Cl^e l^eir of m^gau tie Cl^ereburglj. 

InCllllSltlOn made at Devizes on Thursday next after the 
feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 12 Edward I [1284], 
before yi?A« de Haveringe and John de Walton^ to inquire by the oath 
of John de Tynyde, Geoffrey de Wrockeshal, William de Grenvil, 
William de Forstal, Henry de Seme, Richard de Hyivye, Robert de 
Yvymere, Richard Pig, Silvester Dunnel, Roger le Cras, Walter de 
Snapp, Thomas Theyn, Nicholas le Hyr, and Laurence de Stodleye, if 
John, son of Ellen, daughter of Philipp de la Leye, begotten by 
Wigan de Sherburg, be the next heir of the said Wigan, or John, son 
of Christian de Cheddesworth, begotten by the said Wigan, who 
say that 

The said John, son of Ellen, daughter of Philipp de la Leye, 
begotten by the said Wigan, is the next heir of the said Wigan. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward I, No. 99. 
[This is entered in the calendar under 17 Edward I, No. 84.] 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 179 



Extent of the lands and tenements in co. Wilts which were 
of Roger de Karentham, made on Friday next before the 
feast of Holy Trinity, 17 Edward I [1289], by the oath of Alan 
de Lange/ord, Robert Gurald, William Lamberd, Robert Fat, Walter 
Gtleberd, William le Venur, John Burdayn, Laurence Chanterel, 
Robert Cole, William Cole, John Botermere, and Nicholas Serle, who 
say that 

The said Roger held in the vill of Bereford one messuage and 
-80 acres of arable land of the King in chief by the service of 
the serjeanty of keeping the moiety of the forest of Gravele, and 
the said messuage is worth by the year 3^. 4</., and each acre of 
arable land is worth by the year 4</. : sum zbs. %d. He held in 
the said vill 3^ acres of meadow of the King in chief by the said 
service, price of the acre 18^.: sum ^s. ^d. The profit of the 
bailiwick of keeping the said moiety of the forest of Gravel is 
worth by the year, clear, 3J. ^d., because he paid per annum at 
the King's Exchequer gs., and to the Cathedral Church of Sarum 
izd. The pasture for oxen and sheep is not estimated, because it 
is in common. 

The said Roger held in the vill of Bereford 22 acres of arable 
land of the Prioress of Ambresbury in chief by the service of 
8j. per annum, and each acre iS worth by the year zd. : sum 5^. 4«/. 

The said Roger held in the vill of Hurdecote 5 acres of arable 
land of John de la Mare, and each acre is worth by the year 6d. : 
sum 2s. 6d. 

The said Roger held in the vill of Dalwode one messuage, one 
mill, and one piece of meadow of the Abbess of Wilton by the 
service of 20s. by the year, and the said messuage, mill, and 
meadow are worth by the year besides the service 2s. 

The said Roger held 6 cottages in the vill of Bereford of the 
King in chief by the said service, and they are worth by the 
year 6s. 

Sum of the whole of the true value of the extent, 54J. 5^. 

/ohn de Karentham, son of the said Roger, is his next heir, and is 
aged 1 3 years. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 17 Edward I, A'o. 81. 



1 80 Wiltshire 

Edward by the grace of God to Ralph de Hengham and 
John de Lovecot. 

WG assign you to inquire, by the oaths as well of knights^ 
as of others, good and lawful men, of the view of 
Cotapton next Sarum, if Matilda de Haversham, daughter and 
heir of Nicholas de Haversham, who was born at Compton next 
Sarum, and was baptized in the Church of the said vill, and by 
reason of her minority is in our wardship, is of full age or not, 
and therefore we command you to make that inquisition and to 
send it to us without delay. 

Witness Edmund Earl of Cornwall, at Westminster, 10th April,- 
17 Edward I [1289]. 

/ohn de Slondon says that at the feast of St. Laurence last past 
Matilda de la Plank was aged 16 years. Asked how he knew that, 
he said that he was born in Cumpton, where she was born, and he 
was then with her father, and he well knows that she was born 
at the said feast of St. Laurence before the feast of St. Edmund. 

Geoffrey Co/ says that he was born in the said vill, and that he 
inquired about her age of those of the same age. 

/ohn de Hortleye knows it by the chaplain of the said vill, who 
baptized her. 

Robert le Fenere says that he was born and baptized in the same 
vill, and the same year the said Matilda was born his brother was 
killed, and his said brother had a son of the same age. 

William Primerolt was present when Ranulphtis the chaplain 
baptized the said Matilda, and for all his time he served the 
father of the said A. [sic]. 

William le Hunte knows of the age of the said Matilda through 
his neighbours of the said vill, and he inquired diligently about it 
after the summons. 

Walter Gilbert agrees with the above, and adds that he inquired 
about this of Robert de Cumpton, who carried her from the water. 

Robert atte Crozz knows about her age by the relation of 
Ranulphus the chaplain who baptized her, and because they ex- 
pected for two days a certain person who should carry her. 

Walter Ernewy knows about it from the neighbours, and it more 
particularly appears because he diligently inquired after he was 
summoned. 

Thomas de Lucy knows it by the relation of the whole countrj', 
and also from Robert de Cumpton, who carried her. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. i8i 

William de Wilton said that her nurse was with him in the year 
that the said King was crowned. 

Richard Lowis and Robert de Everton have heard it from the said 
chaplain. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 17 Edward I, No. 89. 



milUam ;©utntrn« 

^F • • • 

I nCJlllSltlOn made at Berewyk on Friday next before the 
L feast of St. Margaret the Virgin, 18 Edward I [1290], of 
the lands and tenements which were of William Quintyn, who 
held of the King in chief, by the oath of Alan de Langeford, 
Edmund Falk, Hugh Sireman, John Richer, Thomas Daubeny, 
Nicholas Serle, Walter Mabeli, William Pydewyne, Geoffrey Warin, 
William le Forester, Roger le Dun, and John Waylaund, who say that 

The said William Quintyn held of the King in chief on the day 
that he died one messuage in Magna Wycheford with a certain 
small garden, which is worth per annum, clear, zs. He held 
2 virgates of land which contain in themselves 72 acres of land 
in the said vill, which are worth by the year, clear, 15^., viz., price 
of the acre z^d. Also 5 acres of meadow in the said vill, and 
it is worth, clear, 7^. bd., price of the acre 18^. by the year. He 
held a pasture without number of animals, which is not extended 
because it is in common. The said William had 4 tenants, who 
pay by the year 9^. 3</. at the feast of St. Michael by the service 
of the serjeanty of keeping the moiety of the forest of Gravelynge 
in the north part, which serjeanty is worth by the year, clear, half 
a mark, and by the service of paying to the' King by the year 
at the feast of St. Michael 2^. at the Castle of Sarum, and paying 
to the Prior of Bradele by the year 21^. at the said feast. The 
said William held of Edmund Spigornel and Maurice de Bonham 
one virgate of land in the said vill, which contains in itself 36 acres 
of land, and is worth by the year, clear, 7^-. 6</., price of the 
acre z\d. And that he held of the same lords one rod of meadow, 
which is worth by the year \d., by the service of paying to the 
said Edmund and Maurice at the feast of St. Michael in the first 
year is., and in the second year \%d. 

William, son of the said William Quintyn, is his next heir, and is 
.aged 4 years. 

Sum of the whole value, \^s. -^d. 
Sum of the value, the services being deducted, 25J. 3^. 
^ ^ -k Chan. Inq. p.m., 17 Edward I, No. 87. 



1 82 Wilis hire 

T nquisition made at Tudewonh on Sunday ne.t before the 
JL feast of the Assumption "of the Blessed Mary, i8 Edward I 
[1290], of the lands and tenements which were oi Henry Huseye^ 
who held of the King in chief, by the oath of Peter Croilleboys, 
Berenger de Wel/hall, Henry Duce, Ivo de Kepehull, John Ingolf, 
Richard Gerveys, Richard de Mildeston, Thomas Toller, Richard le 
Heyr, Roger Fraunceis, Adam Denis, and Hugh le Irreis, who say that 
The said Henry Huseye did not hold any lands or tenements of 
the King in chief in co. Wilts as they understand, but he held the 
manor of Standene Huse of the Earl de Ferrariis for one knight's 
fee by knight's service. And the capital messuage, with the 
garden, is worth by the year half a mark. The dovecote is worth 
per annum \s. : sum 10^. Sd. There are there 300 acres of arable 
land, and each acre is worth by itself by the year 4^. : sum loos. 
Also 10 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth by itself by the 
year iSd. : sum 15^. There is there a certain several pasture for 
oxen, which is worth by the year los. There are there three free 
tenants, who pay by the year 16^. 4J. at two terms of the year, viz. 
at Easter and the feast of St. Michael, by equal portions. Also 
one free tenant, who pays by the year i lb. of pepper, viz. at the 
feast of St. Michael. There are there 15 customars, who pay by 
the year 38^. 6d. at three terms of the year, viz., at Easter, at the 
Gule of August, and at the feast of St. Michael, by equal portions. 
There are there two cottars, who pay by the year 3J. at the said 
terms. The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth by the 
year half a mark. Sum, £g igs. 2d. and i lb. of pepper. 

The said Henry Huseye held the manor of Tudeworth of the 
Earl Marshall for the third part of one knight's fee by knight's 
service. The capital messuage, with the garden, is worth by the 
year 4J. There are there 210 acres of arable land, and each acre 
is worth by itself ^d. : sum 52i-. td. There is there a several 
pasture, which is worth by the year is. There is there a certain 
free tenant, who pays by the year 8j. at the four principal terms of 
the year. There are there 5 customars, who pay by the year \os. 
at the said terms. Also 3 customars, who pay by the year \zs. 
at the said terms. The pleas and perquisites of the court are 
worth per annum \s. There is there a certain windmill, which is 
worth by the year zos. Sum, £■] is. bd. 

Henry^ son of the said Henry Huseye, is his next heir, and is- 
aged 25 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 1 8 Edward I, No. 36. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 183 

Inquisition made at WyltoYi on Tuesday next before the 
feast of St. Gregory, 18 Edward I [1290], of the lands and 
tenements of Edith, daughter of Robert de Homynglon, by Alan 
de Lange/ord, Edmund Falk, William Quintyn, Nicholas Serle, John 
Marty n, Walter Thomas, Walter Attebrigge, Thomas le Ryde, Elias 
de Gulde/ord, Walter Warde, Henry le Frye, and Richard le Fonge^ 
who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the said Edith 
may give to the Prior and Convent of Meydenbradelyg one 
messuage and 6 bovates of land in Homynton, because the said 
Edith holds the said messuage and land of the said Prior and 
Convent by the service of 20J. by the year, doing suit at the court 
of the said Prior every 3 weeks. And the said messuage and 
land are worth by the year 50^., and are not charged with any 
other service except only as is aforesaid. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 18 Edward /, No. 74. 



OTalter De T^roctpefe, 

I nOUlSltlOn made at .Wereministre on Saturday next 
X before the feast of St. Gregory, 18 Edward I [1290], before 
Sir Richard de Cumbe, then sheriff of Wilts, by John de Lye, Nicholas 
Malemayns, Walter de Parco, Roger Marmyon, Roger de Lye, William 
CoFsweyn, Arnulphus de Hewode, Simon Colston, William de Gruyny, 
John Loece, Thomas Lung, and Richard Destokes, who say that 

Walter de Brocweye holds one messuage and 30 acres of land 
and 19 acres of meadow in Brocweye and Westbury of the Prior 
of Farle Monacorum and the convent of the same place, paying 
to the said Prior \is. by the year. And they say that the said 
Walter may well give and assign the said messuage, land, and 
meadow without damage to the King, but it is to the damage of 
Sir Walter de Pavely, lord of the hundred of Westbury, of one suit 
every 3 weeks by the year. They do not know any other mesne 
between the King and Walter de Brocweye, except the Prior of Farle 
Monacorum and his convent. The said messuage, land, and 
meadow are worth per annum \os. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 18 Edward I, No. 87. 



1 84 Wiltshire 

iatcl^att) De iHannejston. 

I nqUlSltlOn made before 7?. de Cumbe, sheriff of Wilts, at 
X Tissebury, on Sunday next before the feast of St. Margaret 
the Virgin, 18 Edward I [1290], by the oath oi John de Nipred^ 
Hugh de Fernhulle, William de Briddesherd, Walter de Oclegh, Thomas 
de Sualeweclive, Roger de Colingborne, John Petit, Reginald de Eresgrave, 
Thomas Vincent, Robert Tallard, John Berebac, and Thomas de 
Wyteclive, if it be to the damage of the King or others if we shall 
grant to Richard de Maneston that he may give and assign to the 
Abbess and Convent of Shajtesbury 2 messuages and 2 carucates 
of land in Dunhevede and Tissebury, to hold to them and their 
successors for ever, or not, etc., who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the said Richard 
gives the said messuages and lands to the said Abbess and Convent 
and their successors for ever, because the said Richard holds the 
said messuages and lands immediately of the said Abbess by the 
service of 40^. by the year, and doing suits of the court of the said 
Abbess in Dunheved every 3 weeks, and at the view of frank- 
pledge to be made in the same, and he does not owe any rents or 
services to anyone else for the said premises except to the said 
Abbess in her court. The said messuages and lands are worth 
per annum, clear, £b. There do not remain to the said Richard 
any tenements in the said county of Wilts [besides the said gift]. 
[The said Richard may be put] on assizes, juries, and recognizances 
as he and his predecessors were wont to be put before. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 18 Edward 1., No. 88. 



I nCIUlSltlOn made at Stureton of the true value of the 
X knight's fees and advowsons of Churches which were of 
Hugh Lovel, deceased, who held of the King in chief, to wit, 
in CO. Wilts, by the oath of Robert de Horsynton, Walter Wymund, 
John de Immere, Henry de Pimperlegh, John de Burton, Robert atte 
Hache, Adam Reynold, Robert Artur, Godjrey de Kynete, Robert 
atte Lyghe, Walter le Monir, and John Toppe, who say that 

Ralph de Sturton held of the said Hugh Lovel one knight's fee 
in Sturton with the advowson of the Church, and it is worth 
per annum, clear, £10, and the said Church is worth per annum 
to the use of the parson £11 ts. %d. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 185 

Dated at Sturton in co. Wilts, on Wednesday next before the 
Purification of the Blessed Mary the Virgin, 20 Edward I [1292]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 19 Edward I ^ No. 11. 



g|ol)n tie TBatl^onta. 

I nC[lllSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
X John de Bathonta, made at Bradeford, on Tuesday in the 
feast of St. Dionisius, 19 Edward I [i 291], by John de Alynton^ 
Robert Gale, Walter Wyllame, Godwin atte Cherethe, John le Wyte, 
Henry le Cuhurde, Geoffrey Baldewyne, Henry Wyllame, Roger de 
Cudele, Richard de Cumeretvelle, Robert de Hatte, and William le 
Wyte, who say that 

Walter de Scudemor holds in the vill of Hardenehywich, of the 
fee oi John de Bathonia, half a carucate of land, and paid therefor 
to the said John de Bathonia zos. by bhe year. 

The said John de Bathonia holds the said solidates of land in 
chief of the heirs of Patrick de Chaurthiis \_Cadurcis'], who are in 
the wardship of the King. 

Joan de Boun, daughter of John de Bathonia, is his next heir, and 
is aged 27 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 19 Edward I, No. 13. 



9!o]^n ©roftenejSforD^ clevft. 

I nCIUlSltlOn made at Devyses on Thursday the vigil of 
X St. Matthew the Apostle, 19 Edward I [1291], before Roger 
Extraneus, justice of the forest on this side the Trent, hy John de 
Insula, keeper of the forest of Chuet, Peter Crouleboys, forester of 
the fee of the same forest, Robert Durdent, Humphrey de Dunsterre, 
verderers of the same forest, and hy John de Connaylles, Edmund 
de Cormaylles, John le Dun, Oliver de Punchardun, Giles de Punchardun, 
Robert de Lynkenholte, John de Wymeldon, William de Mucheldevere, 
Roger de Clatjord, William de Cundy, Michael Crok, and John le 
Blound, if it be to the preservation of the King's wild beasts in his 
forest of Chuet, and to the advantage of the said forest, if the 
King should grant to John de Drokejiesjord, clerk, that he may 
enclose his wood of Horsley with certain of his land contiguou • 
to the said wood, containing 80 acres by the perch of the forest, 
with hedge and ditch, and may make a park thereof at his will, 
and may hold the same to him and his heirs for ever, or not. 



1 86 Wiltshire 

All the said jurors, except the said John de Insula, say that it is 
to the preservation of the King's wild beasts, and to the advantage 
of his said forest, if he should grant to the said John de Drokenesford 
that he may enclose with ditch and hedge his said wood of 
Horseley, in the manor of the said John of Eston Crok, which is 
within the metes of the said forest, with his land thereto con- 
tiguous, and may make a park thereof at his will, and may hold 
the same so enclosed and made to him and his heirs for ever^ 
in so much as the liberty of the Bishop and Prior of Winchester 
is between the forest and the said wood of Horselegh, and when 
the wild beasts of the lord the King enter the said wood, coming 
and returning, they are taken in the said liberty, to the great 
diminution of the said wild beasts. 

And the said John de Insula cavils [calumpntaf], and says that 
it is to the damage of the King, in so much that the King will 
lose the attachments of vert and venison in the said wood, if of 
that wood a park be made. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 19 Edward I, No. 41. 



€meUna Jlongejspe^e. 

"W • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made in the morrow of St. Clement, 

A 20 Edward I [1291], by the oath o^ John de Berewyk, John 
de la Mere, Henry de Ockeburn, clerk, Jordan Quyniyn, William 
Sennior, Thomas Bernard, John de Horeputte, William de Dodejordf 
junior, John de Bremel, Robert de Erdescote, John de Molendino, and 
Richard Stive, who say that 

To those 10 librates of land which Emelina Lungespeye wishes to- 
give to the Warden of the Chapel of St. Katharine of Wamberch 
belong three holders of virgates \yirgarii^ who hold 3 virgates of 
land in Est Wamberch, which are worth per annum \os. ; also two 
holders of virgates who hold 2 virgates of land in West Wamberg, 
which are worth per annum zos. ; also four tenants who hold 4 half- 
virgates of land in West Wamberg, and they are worth per annum 
20J. ; also one tenant who holds one croft, and it is worth per 
annum 2^. 

To the said i o librates of land belong 2 1 acres of meadow, and 
they are worth per annum 26^. zd. ; also 54^ acres of arable land, 
and they are worth per annum 58^. ^d.; also 24 acres of arable 
land, and they are worth per annum %s. ; also pleas and perquisites, 
and they are worth per annum \os.; also pasture for 12 oxen or 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 187 

other animals, and it is worth per annum i is. ; also pasture for 
100 sheep, and it is worth per annum 3J. bd. The said 10 librates 
of land are held of the Earl of Lincoln and Margery his wife, by 
the sixth part of one knight's fee, and the said Earl and Margery 
of the King in chief, so that the King may have damage in the 
time of wardship, as from ward to ward. And the said Earl shall 
have damage as in wards, marriages, reliefs, heriots, fines of lands, 
redemptions of natives, and other like things. The said Earl shall 
have damage of the mowing of 5 men for two days, mowing in the 
meadow of the said Earl, whose works are worth per annum zs. bd., 
to wit, for the said 2 days. Also the works of 4 men making 
[dispergeniium] the hay in the meadow for 2 days are worth per 
annum %d. Also the work of one man carrying an acre to the use 
of the mowers for 2 days are worth \d. The said Earl will have 
the damages aforesaid unless the said Emelina will satisfy him in 
some other way. 

The lands and tenements remaining in the hand of the said 
Emelina, in Wamberg, are worth per annum, clear, £^o, but they 
do not know that the said £zo of land may suffice for the aids, 
tallages, fines, redemptions, amercements, contributions, and other 
things as although 20 librates and 10 librates of land jointly 
suffice [?], but nevertheless they say that the tenements remaining 
in the hand of the said Emelina, besides the said 10 librates of 
land which she wishes to give, suffice to sustain all customs. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 19 Edward I, No. 91. 



J^roof of age of pijtlip l^agneL 

IrK^UlSltlOn concerning the age of Philip Paynel, brother 
and heir of John Paynel, taken at Malmesbury on Sunday ii> 
the feast of St. Silvester the Confessor, 19 Edward I [1290]. 

John de Cantehrige says that the said Philip was born at Pyriton, 
in the hundred of Stapel, in co. Wilts, on the day of the Assumption 
of the Blessed Mary, about the first hour, 53 Henry III [1269], 
and was baptized in the Church of St. Mary of Pyriton, and Richard, 
then vicar of the said Church, baptized him on the morrow of the 
feast of the said Assumption in the morning. Asked as to who 
were his godfathers and godmothers, he says that Philip Basset^ 
uncle of the mother of the said Philip Paynel, being then at la 
Fasterne, his manor, and being asked to carry the said Philip from 
the font and to give him his name, sent Hugh de Curteney and 
John de Pyriton, his servants, to Pyriton, to carry the said Philip 



1 88 Wiltshire 

from the font and to give him the name oi Philip Basset. And 
Agnes, then the wife of Roger de Writel, held him, and was his 
godmother. Asked as to his knowledge, and in what way it 
appears to him concerning the lapse of time, says that a certain 
John le Frie, of Pyriton, married a certain Emma by name, at the 
term of Hokeday, before the nativity of the said Philip next 
previous, and the said John now sworn then met the said John le Frie 
with a great company conducting his said wife, and struck a certain 
William Champenyes, who was loudly calling out at him, on the 
head with a stick, on account of which he was afterwards brought 
in plea in the hundred of Wor[th] ... by the said William, 
and was gravely amerced, and made amends to the said William in 
large sums of money. 

Thomas le Teyeis says that on the Friday of Pentecost, 50 Henry III 
[1266], he married Hugina de Chanu \_Cheney}\ and in the second 
year following there was born to him a daughter called Joan, who is 
now aged 22 years and a half. The said Philip Paynel was born in 
the year next following the nativity of the said Joan. 

Thomas Malreward does not recollect the hour at which the said 
Philip was born, but says that on the day of St. Andrew the Apostle, 
in the 53rd year of Henry HI, there was born to him a son named 
Andrew, who is now of the age of 22 years and more. 

William de A^eville S2iy% that at Pentecost, in the said 53rd year, 
there was born to him a daughter named Margery, who in the 
15th year of her age married a certain Henry de Sloke, and in the 
following year gave birth to a daughter named Alice, who is now 
of the age of 6 years and more. 

John le Frie says that in the 50th year of Henry HI, on the 
morrow of Hokeday, he married Emma his wife, and in the 
following year she gave' birth to a daughter called Alice, who 
still lives and is married ; and the said Philip was born at the 
Assumption of the Blessed Mary next following the said marriage. 

Geoffrey de Marisco says that Robert his son was born at the feast 
of St. Peter Advincula in the said 53rd year, and the said Philip 
Paynel was born at the Assumption of the Blessed Mary. 

William Crups says that a certain John Balle married JuUan his 
kinswoman in the 53rd year of Henry HI, and the said William 
then ministered at the said nuptials, and at the Assumption of the 
Blessed Mary next following the said Philip was born. 

Philip de Ford .... was born at Cirencester a certain 
Jordan de Quermakare {}), his special friend, married a cexidcin Emma 
de Havedon at Pentecost in the said 53rd year, and on the feast 
•of the Assumption next following the said Philip was born. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 189 

John de la Rochel says that the sz\di Jordan de Quermakyrei)'), his 
next neighbour, married his said wife .... 

Elias de Mandevil ... let to farm to a certain Henry de 
Writel one acre of land in the . . . year from the feast of 
St. Michael for the term of 20 years, which at the feast of 
St. Michael . . . according to the form of the writing, 
reverted to the said Elias because his father is deceased . . . 

Henry de la Bum .... 

Michael de Garderoha .... 

[^Document torn azvay.~\ 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 19 Edward I, No. 104. 



T . • • 

J nCJUlSltlOn taken on Tuesday next after the feast of 
X St. Scolastica the Virgin, 20 Edward I [1292], in the county 
of Wilts, of the lands and tenements which were of John de Bonn, 
by the oath of Richard le Bernir, John Gustard, John de Wodemuln, 
James de Erie, Thomas le Heyr, John de Molend' of Rusteshale, 
Imr' le Barnevile, Richard Doss, John Sahmneit, Richard de Aqua, 
William Carpentar, Simon de Molend' of Cherleton, and Walter 
Malewayn, who say that 

John de Bonn held nothing in chief of the lord the King in 
CO. Wilts on the day that he died, but he held the manor of 
Wylesford of the lord //. de Bonn, Earl of Herejord and Essex, by 
the service of one pair of gilt spurs and by tenure by socage, and 
the said manor is worth per annum, clear, £11. 

He also held the manor of Maningford of the lord H. de Boun, 
Earl of Herejord and Essex, by the service of the sixth part of half 
a knight's fee, and it is worth per annum, clear, ;^2o, and by 
homage. 

Henry de Boun, his son, is his next heir, and is aged 1 5 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 20 Edward I, No. 7. 



asoger De Cale^ton* 



•^r • • • 

I n(jmSltlOn made at Devyses on Tuesday in the feast of 

X St. Edward, King and Martyr, 20 Edward I [1292]. of the 

lands and tenements which were of Roger de Calestone, by the oath 



190 Wilis hire 

o^ Adam U Chaumherlayn, Walter de Bryddesherd, Hugh le Schetere, 
William de Brudesyer, Roger de Estrop, Thomas de Mere, William 
Haymund, Walter Lof, Adam Welybond, William Beythine, John 
Richer, and John Pye, who say that 

Roger de Calestone held in Calestone and Camersford one 
messuage and 2 carucates of land at fee farm by socage of the 
lord the King in chief, paying therefor yearly at the King's 
Exchequer 581. at Michaelmas, and it is worth per annum, clear, 
;^io. The said Roger held nothing else of the King in chief on 
the day that he died. He held one meadow and a certain pasture 
of the Treasurer of Salisbury by knight's service, paying to the 
said Treasurer by the year 20s., and they are worth per annum 20s. 

The said Roger held one knight's fee in Lyttlecote oi Robert de 
London in chief by knight's service, and it is worth per annum, 
clear, £\o. 

He also held one hide of land, in Childhamton, of the Abbess 
of Wilton, in chief by knight's service, and it is worth per annum 
50J. ; also one carucate of land, in Parva Derneford, of the Earl of 
Lincoln, by knight's service, and it is worth per annum, clear, \oos. 
He also held, in Ebbelesburne Wake, \oos. of rent oi Ingram Beneg 
]^Ingelram Bennger'], by knight's service. 

Roger, son of the said Roger de Calestone, is his next heir, and is 
aged I year and a quarter. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 20 Edward I, No 14. 



IHoger De Calejston. 

■_■ • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn taken at Aundeuore on Saturday next after 

X the feast of St. Gregor5', 20 Edward I [1292], hy John le Poor, 
William Syfryde, Henry le Slyke, John de Monck, John de Bulkeputt, 
John de Wynion, John le Pre, Henry Yserne, Walter Conenaunt, John 
le Syr, John Wymbeldon [_?'], and Roger Selyde, who say that 

Roger de Calyston had a certain yearly rent of ;^io in the vill of 
Enham Militis [co. Hants], which said vill is held of the heirs of 
Matthew de Columbar, and the said heirs of the King in chief hold 
the said vill, and the said rent of ;^io is paid at the four principal 
terms of the year by the hands of the Bishop oi Bath, who holds 
the said manor of Enham Militis in fee. The advowson of the 
Church of Enham Militis belongs to the heirs o^ Roger de Calyston. 

Roger, son of the said Roger de Calyston, is his next heir, and 
is aged one year and a quarter. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 20 Edward I, No. 14. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 191 

laoger De Calejstone. 

I nOUlSltlOn taken at New Sarum on Saturday next before 
X the day of St. Gregory the Martyr, 20 Edward I [1292], 
of the lands and tenements which were of Roger de Caleston in 
CO. Wilts, by the oath of William Herdman, Thurstan Attehalle, 
Henry le Freys, William Beschyve, Richard de Midleston, John le 
Lange, William le Rughe, Reginald le Frankelayn, Waller Dauwe, 
William Seman, Robert Justice, and Walter Legal. 

[This Inquisition is a duplicate of the one taken at Devyses 
on Tuesday in the feast of St. Edward, King and Martyr, 
20 Edward I (1292), given above.] 



I nOUlSltlOn made on Thursday in the feast of St. Valentine, 
X 20 Edward I [1292], at Sarum, of the lands and tenements 
which were of Peter Spileman, by the oath of John Dumbdale, 
William de la Hegge, Peter de la Stishele, Roger le Peyn, William de la 
Beidenhulle, John de la Mere, Richard de la Waterdich, Hamond de 
Niwetone, Symon Wyther of Burchalke, Simon Wyther of Gerarde- 
stone, John de Molind", and Richard Berner, who say that 

The said /V/er had in Coulesfeld i^ hides of land, and held the 
same of the King in chief, and it is a member of Brokenhuste, and 
is worth per annum £%, and there is serjeanty. 

The said Philip had in Chalke one hide of land, and holds the 
same of Sir Pder Skudemor, and it is worth per annum los. 

He also had in Laneford one acre of meadow, and held the 
same oi Johti de Lye, and it is worth per annum \id. 

He also had in Winterbume Madinton \%s. of yearly rent, and 
which are held of Sir Godfrey Giffard, of the manor of Bovtone. 

He had in Shaghe the third part of one knight's fee, and holds 
the same of Henry de Thisteldene by homage, and it is worth per 
annum 40^-. 

Matilda, the wife o{ John de Grimstede, and Katharine, the wife 
of Richard Testavode, are the next heirs of the said Piter. The 
said Matilda is of the age of 30 years, and the said Katharine 
25 years. 

The said Peter nn.rried Isabel, daughter of Ralph Skurci, but it 
is not known whetlic: she is pregnant or not. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 20 Edward I, No. 21. 



l^ . Wiltshire 

l&eter He la flgare- 

Inquisition made at Stipellavinton, in co. Wilts, on 
Friday in the vigil of the feast of All Saints, 20 Edward I 
f 1292], of the lands and tenements which were o^ Peter de la Mare^ 
deceased, by the oath of William Malewayn, John Philip, William 
Dalerun, Geoffrey Moryz, Robert de la Sale, Thomas Culle, William de 
la Hale, Robert Carpunter, William Clericus, John Wlf, John Qambo, 
and John de Wdebrigg, who say that 

The said Peter de la Mare held in the manor of Stupellavinton on 
the day that he died of the King in chief 3 carucates of land, 
to wit, 88 acres of sandy land, of the which each acre is worth 3^. : 
sum 21S. Also 20 acres in another tillage of deep land, and the 
acre is worth %d. : sum 13J. j\.d. There are there 374 poor acres 
upon the hill, and the acre is worth 2d. : sum 62^'. ^d. Also 
7 acres of meadow, and the acre is worth zs. : sum 14^. There 
is there of the rent of freemen by the year i$s. Also of the rent 
of villeins by the year ^21 2s. ^d. There is there pasture for 
300 sheep, and it is worth per annum 1 2s. td. ; also pasture for 
f 6 oxen, and it is worth by the year zs. ; also pasture for 6 plough 
horses, and it is worth by the year zs. There is there a certain 
underwood, and it is worth by the year bd. The pleas and 
perquisites are worth per annum 6j. %d. Also the easements of 
the court with the garden 6s. Sd. 

Sum-total in all issues, ;^i8 igs. ^d. 

The said Peter held the said lands in Stupellavinton of the King 
in chief for one knight's fee, and by the service of 205'. to be paid 
each year at the Castle of Devizes at the feast of St. Michael, 
or keeping the ward in the said castle for 40 days at his own costs 
in the time of war. 

The said Peter held in Cnabbewlla next Draycote 2 virgates of 
land of the lord Henry, Earl of Lincoln, in capite by the service 
of doing suit at the court of Trobrigge from 3 weeks to 3 weeks, 
and it is worth per annum, clear, 20J. ^ 

Robert de la Mare is the eldest son and next heir of the said 
Peter de la Mare : the said heir will be 18 years of age at the feast 
of the Purification of the Blessed Mary, and the marriage of the 
said heir is worth ;^i5o. Sum, 20s. 

Sum-total, £ig igs. 4^. besides the marriage. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 20 Edward I, No. 39. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 193 

Cl^e aibbe^^ anD Consent of ^t, iHar^ of 
22Hnton* 

Inquisition made before/ de m//tf«^, sheriff of Wilts, on 
Friday next before the feast of St. Michael, 13 Edward I 
[1.285], by William le Frend, John de Esscote, Richard Dwelie, Thomas 
le £yr, Richard de Wik, Richard Ennoc, Gilbert de Aula, John Gustard, 
Richard- le Bernir, Adam de la Rivere, Walter Malewayn, James de 
Erlege, and Bartholomew de Hethelhampton, who say that 

If the lord the King should grant that John de la Provendre, 
of Alecaninges, may give to the Abbess and Convent of the Church 
of the Blessed Mary of Winton one messuage and 18 acres of land 
in Erchefunte, to hold for ever, it is not to the damage or prejudice 
of the King or others, because that messuage and land are of the 
fee of the said Abbess and are held of her in chief. 

The said messuage and land are worth per annum 33^. \d. in all 
issues. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 13 Edward J No. 142. 



' 3Io]^n De caitDecumbe* 

I nqUlSltlOn made before R. de Cumhe, sheriff of Wiltshire, 

X at Schorston, on Thursday next after the feast of St. Hilary, 

20 Edward I [1292], by the oath oi Adam Hardy ng, Roger Bubbe^ 

Jordan de Aqua, Osbert Ruffyn, Hugh Roylli, John Hubert, William 

Percehay, John de Bourlee, Roger de Pekynghull, Walter de Ba, Walter 

Willam, Robert de la Boxe, and Richard Kaynel, who say that 

It is not to the hurt or prejudice of the lord the King or of others 
{[John de Wydecumbe shall give and assign half a virgate of land in 
Bremel, and William de Wotton 10 acres of land in Barewc, and 
William la Wayie 7 acres of land in Kyngton to the Abbot and 
Convent of Malmesbury, to hold to them and their successors 
for ever. 

The said John holds the said half-virgate of land in Bremel of 
the lord Abbot o^ Malmesbury in chief by the rent of is. ^d., and by 
making suits at his court of Bremel, and the Abbot of the King 
in chief. The said land is worth per annum \os. 

The said William de Wotton holds the said 10 acres of land in 
Barewc of the lord Prior of Farlegh by the rent of 3^. \d., and 
by doing suits at his court, and the said Prior of the King in chief. 
The said land is worth per annum 5^. 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. n. I* 

1 k 



194 Wiltshire 

William la Wayie of Chippeham holds the said 7 acres of the 
lord Abbot of Glastoii by the rent of \d. only, and the said Abbot 
of the King in chief. The said land is worth per annum 3^. bd. 

The lands and tenements i-elating to^ them, besides the said gift 
and assignment, sufi&ce to do the customs and services as well 
for the lands given as for those retained, and to sustain all 
other charges as is contained in all the articles contained in the 
original writ. 

The said assignments are to the advantage of the King on 
account of the vacancies when they shall happen. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 20 Edward /, No. 92. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Tissebury on Thursday next after 
X the feast of St. Augustine, 21 Edward I [1293], by 24 jurors 
as well of the hundred of Wermenistre as of the hundreds of 
Doneworth and Chalk, to wit, by Sir Hugh le Chamberlayn, William 
de Wodemanton, Robert Russel, John Durneford, John Petyt, John 
Herherd, John Sonnygges, Robert Goscelyn, John de Lye, Robert Swayn, 
John Botiller, Symon Colston, Roger Purbyk, John Nipred, John de 
Asjold, Edward de Wyke, Walter de Okele, Bartholomew Atte Ford, 
. . . Macyn, Ralph de Marisco, Reginald de Colyngeburne, Roger 
de Ashurst, Thomas Wurston, and Robert Manger, who say that 

Peter de Escudamor held nothing of the King in chief on the day 
that he died. He was seised of the manor of Norton and held the 
said manor of Sir John Traygoz in chief, and paid by the year to the 
said/o>^« Traygoz for the ward of Euwyas 17J. i\d., and it is worth 
per annum £\o. 

He held also the manor of Fithyde of the said John Traygoz, and 
paid per annum to the said John i is. for the ward of Euwyas, and 
it is worth per annum £\o. 

He also held a certain tenement in Trowe of the Abbess of Wilton, 
and pays to the said Abbess \os., and it is worth \os. 

He also held at Binle a certain tenement and one virgate of land 
of Sir Eustace de Hache, and pays to the said Eustace \s. id., and it 
is worth — . 

Alice de Beaumont, daughter of the said Peter, is his next heir, 

and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 1 Edward I, No. 4. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 195 

Writ dated at Westminster, 7th June, 21 Edward I [1293]. 

The King to Malculm de Hark, escheator on this side the Trent. 
Because we understand that Dionisia de Stokes and Robert her son 
have alienated from us 3 knight's fees, which are immediately held 
of Edmund Earl of Cornwall as of the honour of Walingford : we, 
wishing to be certified therein, command you by the oath of good 
and lawful men of your bailiwick diligently to inquire whether the 
said Dionisia and Robert held the said three fees of the said Earl 
or not, etc., etc. 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at New Sarum, in co. Wilts, on Monday 
A next after the Translation of the Blessed Thomas the Martyr, 
21 Edward I [1292], concerning knight's fees alienated in the 
hundred of Cheggelewe, which are held immediately of the lord, 
Edmund Earl of Cornwall, [as] of the honour of Walingford, by 
the oath of John de Hanckynton, Richard de la Lee, Walter de Ba, 
Thomas Scolace, Hugh Doili, J. le Palmere, William Jonkyns (?), 
Gilbert Franceys, William de Teukyden, /. de Clatford, J. de Brumel- 
ham, and John Huberd, who say that 

Five and a half virgates of land are held of the honour of 
Walingeford, in the vill of Cheggelewe, which Adam de Puriton 
at one time held of the fee of Apptlton, and which the said Adam 
gave in pure and perpetual alms for the support of one chaplain 
for his soul for ever. Clement, vicar of Alston, now holds the said 
5^ virgates of land. 

Dionisia de Stokes and Robert her son hold the fee of Appelton, 
in CO. Cornwall, of the honour of Walingeford. 

The said 5 virgates of land are held for the fourth part of one 
fee, and are worth per annum, clear, \os. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 21 Edward 1, No. 2Sa. 



IT • • • 

I nQUlSltlOn made at Tokham on Thursday next before 
JL the feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 21 Edward I [1293], 
of the lands and tenements which were of Silvester Doygnel, by the 
oath of Thomas Tyeys, Thomas Bernard, William Seymor, Robert 
Toky, William de Dodde/ord, Richard Berner, John Rochele, John 
de MolindifH , William Carpentar, John Lilebon, Edmund Chese, and 
Nicholas de Stowell, who say that 



196 Wiltshire 

The said Silvester held certain lands and tenements in Hywysch 
of the King in chief by the service of 13J. \d. by the year, to be 
delivered into the Exchequer by the hands of the sheriff of 
Wiltshire, and to be paid yearly to the said sheriff at the feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, by reason of which service the 
said Silvester and his ancestors were in the wardship of the King 
and his ancestors. 

There are there 80 acres of land, price of the acre ^d. : sum,. 
zts. Sd. Also 40 acres of poor land, price of the acre 2d. : 
sum, 6s. 8d. Also 6 acres of meadow, price of the acre iid. : sum, 
6s. The pasture there is worth per annum i2d. There is there 
of the rent of the freemen and villeins with their services by the 
year 75^. Sd. The easements of the court with the garden are 
worth per annum izd. The pleas and perquisites of the court are 
worth per annum zs. Sum, iigs. There is there a certain church 
the advowson whereof belongs to the said Silvester, and the said 
church is worth per annum 5 marks. 

Peter, son of the said Silvester, is his next heir, and was aged 
14 years on the feast of St. Leonard last past. 

The said Silvester and Margaret his wife were jointly enfeoffed 
and seised on the day the said Silvester died hy John Doignel and 
Simon de Ordeston of one virgate and one acre of land in Hywysch, 
paying therefor by the year to the said John and Simon one rose, 
and the said land is worth per annum i6s. -jd. ; and by Cristiana 
Spileman of 3 virgates of land in West Tokham, paying therefor 
per annum 2\s. to the said Cristiana, and the said 3 virgates of 
land are worth per annum 30J. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 21 Edward I, No. 283. 



^ilteMer J^o^gnel ann imargaret l^tis tnife* 

^F • • • 

I nC[UlSlllOn made at Hywys, in co. Wilts, on Sunday in 
X the vigil of the Blessed Margaret the Virgin, 21 Edward I 
[1293], of the lands and tenements which were oi Silvester Doynel, 
deceased, and Margaret his wife, of the which the said Silvester 
and Margaret were jointly enfeoffed, by the oath o{ Peter le Champion, 
William de Setimor, fames de Erie, William Doddeford, junior, Adam 
de la Rivere, Thomas Bernard, Robert Tonky, Adam de Colecote, 
Edmund Chuse, John Lylehon, Robert atte Waterdich, and Nicholas 
de Stowell, who say that 

Silvester and Margaret were jointly enfeoffed of one virgate and 
one acre of land in Hywys, and that they continued their seisin 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 197 

thereof until the death of the said Silvester, to wit, for 15 years 
before the death of the said Silvester, of John Doynel and Simon de 
Ordeston, by the service of one rose per annum. 

The said Silvester and Margaret were also jointly enfeoffed of 
3 virgates of land in Westokham, and continued their seisin thereof 
until the death of the said Silvester, to wit, for 24 years, by the 
service of 24J. per annum of Cristiana Spileman in chief. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 21 Edward I, No. 283. 



-^^ • • • 

I nC[UlSl tlOn made at Netheraven, in co. Wilts, on Thursday 
jL next after the Nativity of the Blessed Mary, 21 Edward I 
{1293], of the lands and tenements which were of Richard de Cumbe, 
deceased, by the oath of John de Lyilecote, William de la Dene, 
John le Frankelayn, John Maundeverr, John Lucas, Adam . . . 
Simon Clericus, John Beamund, John le Felawe, Philip . . . 
who say that 

The said Richard de Cumbe on the day that he died held 
{Lee] farm, paying at the King's Exchequer 12s. 8d. . . . 
in the same vilj of the Prior of Novo Mercato one messuage 
. . . of silver by the year, and the said land is worth 
. . . in fee in the vill of Cumbe of the lord, John Bishop oi 
Winchester, one messuage and one carucate of land . . . 
knight's fee, and the said land is worth per annum, clear, loos. 
The said Richard also held ... in the vill of Cumpden 
one messuage and 6 bovates of land of the heirs of John de 
Bremmor by the service . . . and the said land is worth per 
.annum, clear, £a^. 

The said Richard de Cumbe and Richard his son [jointly held] 
one messuage and one carucate of land of Sir John Lovel, of 
Snotescumbe, by the service of \d. per annum, and they are worth 
per annum, clear, ... 

They also held in the vill of Tod[eworth] ... of Sir Henry 
de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, by the service of half a knight's fee, and 
it is worth per annum, clear, . . . 

And be it known that the said Richard de Cumbe and Richard 
his son held the said tenements jointly enfeoffed to them and the 
heirs of the said Richard the son. 

Simon de Combe is the son and next heir of the said Richard, 
and is aged 1 8 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 21 Edward I, No. 29. 

\This Inquisition is in a very bad state.'] 
1 4 • 



198 Wiltshire 

Kobett iBurnell, ^Bi^l^op of 'Batl^ anD mt\\$. 

IF • • • 

I nQUlSltlOn made at»Kyvele, in co. Wilts, on Monday next 
X after the feast of St. Nicholas, 21 Edward I [1292], of the 
lands and tenements which were of Robert, Bishop of Bath and 
Wells, by the oath of Richard le Blund, Walter de Edyndon, William 
de Langhurste, William de Testwode, John atte Lese, John Burel, John 
Frankelayn, John Wyger, John Beneyt, John de Alryntone, Robert de 
Aula, and Ralph le Teyn, who say that 

The said Robert on the day that he died held jointly with 
Sir Philip Bumel the manor of Magna Chyverel of the inheritance 
in fee of Sir Reginald de Balun and his heirs, by the service of one 
knight's fee, and it is worth per annum, clear, £\%. 

The said Robert held the manor of Kyvele of the lord, Richard 
Earl oi Arundel, for the term of 12 years, and it is worth per annum, 
clear, £to. 

Sir Philip Bumel is the next heir of the said Robert, and is aged 
25 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 21 Edward I, No. 50. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Timberhurst, in the forest of Braden,. 
X by the precept of the King, on Sunday next after the feast of 
St. Michael, 21 Edward I [1293], before Roger de Molis, keeper 
of the said forest, if it be to the damage or hurt of the said 
forest if the King shall grant to Hugh le Despenser that he may 
enclose 30 acres of his wood which is within the metes of the said 
forest for the enlargement of his park of La Fasterne, by the oath 
of the foresters and verderers and of Roger de Corjton, Nicholas 
Dunars, John de Grantebrig, John de Hardinton, Thomas Malewardf 
John de la Rochel, Richard Stine, William de St. Maur, Robert Toki, 
Thomas Bernard, John Goykin, and Reginald Wace, who say that 

It is not to the damage or hurt of the King or of the said forest 
or of any other if the said Hugh should enclose 30 acres of hi* 
wood for the enlargement of his park and should hold the same 
so enclosed. 

There is there no resort of the beasts of the King. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 1 Edward I, No. 78* 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 199 

Etcl^atD De la l^oissterne. 

^r • • • 

I nC][mSltlOn made at Chippeham on Monday next after 
X the feast of St. John ante Portam Latinam, 21 Edward I 
[1293], befprethesheriflf of Wilts, by the oath oi Roger de Pekynghull, 
hhn Huberd, William Pater noster, John de Clat/ord, Matthew Roylli, 
Richard Kaynel, Roger Buhbe^ William Perchay, John de Bourleet 
Richard de Comere Welle, Nicholas Seyleman, Thomas de Pedewrthe, 
and Henry William of Budestimere, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or of others 
\{ John de la Hulk should give one messuage and 2 virgates of land 
in Coleme to the Abbot and Convent of Malmesbury, to have to 
them and their successors for ever. 

The said John holds the said messuage and land of the -said 
Abbot and Convent of Malmesbury by the rent of lis. and the 
carriage of 2 cartloads of hay in socage and suits at their court of 
Iwerygge : they are worth per annum, clear, los. 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if 
Richard de la Posterne should give to the Abbot and Convent of 
Malmesbury one messuage and 60 acres of land in Thornhulle next 
Malmesbury : to hold to them and their successors for ever. 

The said Richard holds the said messuage and land of the said 
Abbot by the rent of 19^^. in socage, and by suit at their hundred 
of Malmesbury from 3 weeks to 3 weeks : they are worth per 
annum, clear, 13J. 4^. 

The said John and Richard have tenements remaining beyond 
the said gift and assignment to sustain all customs and services 
and all other charges whatsoever. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 1 Edward /, No. 1 1 6. 



Cl^omas De mt^t ^toinnone* 

M— • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Chyppeham, ist August, 22 Edward I 
X [1294], of the goods and tenements which were of Thomas 
de West Swyndone on the day that he died, by the oath of Reginald 
Krok, Adam Harding, Nicholas Seliman, John de Burle, Reginald 
Bobbe, John de Bamptone, Geoffrey le Clerk, William de Perhamy 
Richard Bruton, Walter de Comptone, Walter Aljrich, and Ralph de 
Hortone, who say that 
The said Thomas held nothing of the ICing in chief in co. Wilts 



200 Wilis hire 

on the* day that he died, but he held half a virgate of land in the 
vill and in the fields of Quemerford, with the bedellary of the 
hundred of Calne, as well foreign as intrinsic, of the Lady Milicent 
de Monte Alto, in chief by the service of i lb. of cummin, yearly to 
be paid to the said Lady Milicent and her heirs. 

The said land with the bedellary is worth per annum, clear, 15J. 

John Elys, brother of the said Thomas, is his next heir, and is 
aged 40 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 22 Edward I, No. 3. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Hardene, 26th October, 22 Edward I 

A [1294], of the lands and tenements which were oi Richard de 

Harden on the day that he died, by William de Stocke, William 

Dakesman, Ralph de Malewayn, Robert Pypel, Richard Couenaunt, 

John de Stockes, William Russell, John le Selir, Richard Russell, 

Walter Seymer{}), John Fynamor, and Geoffrey Sauuage, who say that 

Richard de Harden held of the King in chief on the day that 
he died one acre and a half of land in Harden, together with 
a certain bailiwick of the King's forest of Sauernake which is 
called Broyl de Bedewynd, by the service of 8j. yearly to be paid at 
the Castle of Marleborough. 

The said i\ acres of land are worth per annum 3c/., and the 
said bailiwick %s. 

The said Richard also held a certain ... in Harden of 
William de . . . hy the service of finding one man with one 
horse and a certain sack for cloths at his own costs for 40 days 
in the time of war. 

Theje is there one messuage, and it is worth per annum 3^. 
There are there 14?. g^d. of rent to be paid at the feasts of 
St. Michael and the Nativity of the Lord, at Easter (?), and the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist. There are there 80 acres of arable 
land, price of the acre 2d. ; also 2 acres of meadow, and they are 
worth per annum 2s. There is there a common pasture for oxen 
and also a common pasture for sheep, which are worth per 
annum 2s. 

Roger de Harden, brother of John de Harden, father of the said 
Richard, uncle of the said Richard, is the next heir of the said 
Richard, and is aged 30 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 22 Edward I, No. 4. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 201 

T • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn made at Stepellauinton on Friday next after 
A the feast of St. Giles, 22 Edward I [1294], of the lands and 
tenements which were of Philip Burnel, by the oath of William 
Perham, Simon le Free, William de Slok, Simon Buhbe, William Ace, 
William Goule, Robert de Aula, Ralph de Saun/ord, Hugh Drueys, 
Geoffrey le Clerk, Walter de Camera, and John de Wodebrugge, who 
say that 

The said Philip was seised in his demesne on the day that he 
■died of certain lands and tenements. in Magna Cheneverel, and held 
the same of the King in chief by the service of one knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage which is worth in herbage 
and the fruit of the garden by the year 6s. Sd. There are there 
200 acres of land, price of each acre 2d.: sum, 33J. ^. Also 
12 acres of meadow, price of each acre iSd. : sum, iSs. The 
several pasture there is worth per annum i ^s. ^d. There is there 
pasture for sheep, and it is worth per annum 25J. There is there 
of the rent of the freemen at Easter and Michaelmas 14J. ^d. ; also 
of the rent of customars and cottars at Michaelmas 58^. lod., and 
at Easter 385. 4(f. The said customars give to the larder of the 
lord at the feast of St. Martin ids. 8d. ; also at the feast of 
St. Martin of church scot (chyrecheto) 40 hens, price of each id. : 
sum, 3J. 4^. Also the plea and perquisites are worth per annum zs. 
Sum, ;£i I igs. gd. 

The said Philip had 20 marks of early rent in Budeston, to 
be taken of the said manor, the moiety at Michaelmas and the 
moiety at le Hokeday. 

Edward, son of the said Philip, is his next heir, and is aged 
7 years as they understand. 

Chan. /fig. p.m., 22 Edward I, No. 45. 



pi)ilip Vnxnzh 

T • • • 

I nCIUlSltlOn made at Magna Cheverel on Sunday next 
JL before the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist, 22 Edward I 
[1294], of the knight's fees and advowsons of churches which were 
of Philip Burnell, by the oath of Johti le Frend, Simon le Fre, 
Richard Dwelye, Nicholas de Cruk, Geoffrey Moriz, Robert de Grange, 
William the Clerk, John de Wodebrigge, Richard Blunt, Robert de 
Aula, William Goule, and Robert Golding, who say that 



202 Wiltshire 

William de Wautone held of Philip Bumel on the day that he 
died the fifth part of one knight's fee in the vill of Fennyesottone^ 
and that fifth part is worth per annum, clear, zos. 

The advowson of the Church of Fennysotton belonged to the 
said Philip on the day that he died, and that Church is worth by 
the year, clear, 20 marks. 

The advowson of the Church of Magna Cheverel belonged to 
the said Philip, and that Church is worth by the year, clear,. 
ID marks. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 22 Edward I, No. 45^. 



anam De ^ttattotr* 

T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Magna Cheleworth before the sheriff 
A of Wilts, on Sunday next after the Purification of the Blessed 
Mary, 22 Edward I [1294], by Nicholas de Abindon, William Brian, 
John Ace, James le Paumer, Thomas Maleward, William Cryps, John 
de Hardinion, John de Graniebrig, John le Frie, Peter de Walecote, John 
Ede, John le French, Henry Emald, Thomas le Wythe, Richard de 
Fortheie, and Henry de la Burne, who say that 

Nine messuages and 10 virgates of land in Stratton juxta Altam 
Swyndon, which Adam de Stratton, who is disinherited for the 
felony which he made, held, were in the King's hand for one year 
and one day, and still are in the King's hand. The said Adam de 
Stratton held the said messuages and lands oi John Walerand and 
his heirs. 

And Richard de Cumb, then sheriff of Wilts, ought to answer for 
the waste day and year. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 22 Edward I, No. 67. 



abbot ne ^tanlegi^* 

IT • • • 

I n(^UlSltlOn taken before Matthew son of John, keeper of 
X the forest of Chyppeham, in co. Wilts, on Friday next before 
the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary, 22;, Edward I [1294], 
by the oath of Alexander de Bokyngham, Geoffrey Reed, Robert Daly, 
foresters, Laurence de Stodleye, Thomas le Theyn, William le Escryuayn, 
and Nicholas le Eyr, verderers, Roger Babbe, Adam le Chamberleyn, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 203 

William de Chel/urste, Robert del Ebrigge, Alan de Lacham, Adam 
Hardyng, and Nicholas le Blund, who say that 

It is not to the damage or hurt of the King or of his forest of 
Chyppeham nor of any other whomsoever if the Abbot of Stanleye 
and the Convent of the same place, in their demesne lands within 
the metes of the said forest outside the cover, may dig iron-ore 
and make iron thereof, and take and carry it away thence whither 
they will. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., -22 Edward /, No. 73. 



cnmunD, Carl of CotniajalU 

Inquisition made before T. de Si. Emero, sheriff of Wilts, 
by writ of the lord the King, on Monday in the feast of 
St. Peter in Cathedra, 22 Edward I [1294], concerning one garden 
and one croft in the vill of Mere, by the oath of Philip Slrug, 
Roger de Caneford, John de Immere, John Cleymond, Roger Cleymond, 
John de Hampstede, John son of Peler de Burthon, Edward Boddeg, 
Walter Trenchejent, Reginald le Tannere, Walter Rodd, and Walter 
AttemuUe, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of others if the King shall 
grant to Edmund, Earl of Cornwall that he may give and assign to 
the Dean and Chapter of Sarum and their successors for ever the 
said garden and croft, except to the damage of the King, for that 
the said garden and croft are held of the King : they are worth 
per annum, clear, 135'. 4^. 

There remains to the said Earl in the said vill of Mere 40 
librates of yearly land, which suffice in all things for the customs 
and all other charges as they were wont to sustain. 

The country by the said grants will not be charged with a 
larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. p.m. t 22 Edward I, No. \ii. 



l^l^ilip le iffrauncerj5. 

Writ dated 12th July, 22 Edward I [1294]. 

Trie King to Malcolm de Harleye, his escheator on this side 
the Trent, greeting. Whereas you lately took into our 
hand one messuage and 40 acres of land in Lokerigge, which 
Philip le Fraunceys gave to the Prior of the house of St. Margaret 



204 Wiltshire 

outside Marleberg and to the brethren of the said house, and one 
messuage in the same vill which Richard le Eyr gave to the said 
Prior and brethren because the said Prior and brethren, without our 
licence, entered into the said tenements after our statute published 
concerning lands and tenements not to be put to mortmain, and 
held the same until at our parliament last past you at our command 
repledged \_replegiasseiis] the said Prior and brethren : we, wishing 
to show the said Prior and brethren our abundant grace in this 
behalf, command you that if the said Prior shall find sufficient 
security to answer to us in our parliament next coming for the 
issues thereof forthcoming in the meantime, if we shall wish to 
have them, you shall cause the said tenements to be repledged 
to the said Prior and brethren by the said security, and by the oath 
of good and lawful men of your bailiwick you shall diligently 
enquire if it be to the damage of ourselves and others if we shall 
grant the said tenements to the said Prior and brethren, etc., etc. 



Inquisition made at Marleberg, in co. Wilts, 19th August, 
22 Edward I [1294], of the lands and tenements which were 
oi Philip Franceys and Richard le Heer in Lokerygg, whereof the 
Prior and brethren of St. Margarets are enfeoifed, by the oath of 
Reginald IVaz, John de Hardynton, William Crespyn, Philip de 
Stanhurn., Peter de Lavynlon, Waller Blake, Waller del Hampslall, 
Gilbert de Bosco, Walter Syward, Richard le \Vyte, Roger Page, and 
John de la Mere, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King, because the Prior does the 
services to the King thereof due and accustomed, and it is not to 
the prejudice of others, because the Earl of Herdford [sic], of 
whom they hold in chief, confirmed their feoffment for zs. to be 
paid every year. 

The said tenements are worth per annum, clear, zs. 

The residue of the land of the said Philip which remains in the 
possession of the heir of the said Philip is worth per annum 6oj. 

The said Prior and brethren hold the house with a curtilage and 
small croft of the gift of Richard le Eyr, and they are worth per 
annum zs. 

The lands which remain in the possession of the said Philip and 
his heirs and Richard fully suffice for all the other charges and 
services which before were wont to be done. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 22 Edward I, No. 139. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 205 

€l^oma0 ne ^t 'Figore. 

"^r • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
A Thomas de St. Vigore, made at Upaven on Thursday next after 
the feast of the Exaltation of Holy Cross, 23 Edward I [1295], by 
William Asser, William the Clerk, Hugh le Shetere, William de 
Taseworth, Gilbert of the same, Richard de la Forde, William of the 
same, William Schort, Richard Sthurstein, John le Frie, John de 
Holecumb, and Richard de Remmesbyr, who say that 

Thomas de St. Vigore held certain lands and tenements in Stock, 
in the hundred of Calne, of the King in chief by the service of half 
a knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth per annum 4-y. 
There are there 128 acres of arable land which are worth zis. ^d. : 
price of the acre zd. There are there 10 acres of meadow, and 
they are worth los. ; also 12 acres of pasture, and they are worth 6s. 
There is there a certain grove containing 3 acres, the profit whereof 
is worth per annum iid. There is there of rent of the freemen by 
the year i6s. ^d. And of rent of certain freemen i lb. of pepper 
and 3 lbs. of cummin, and they are worth iid. There is there of 
the rent of one customary tenant 3^. Sum, 62^. 6d. 

Thomas, son of the said Thomas, is his next heir, and is aged 
27 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 23 Edward I, No. 12. 



jeicl^olais De Tiarbeflet- 

T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Merleberg on Monday next after the 

A feast of St. Michael, 23 Edward I [1295], of the lands and 

tenements which were of Nicholas de Barbeflet, by Reginald Waz, 

John atte Mere, Roger Page, William Crispyn, Peter de Lazyjiton, 

William Frank, Richard le Wyie, Peter Wymark, Henry le Yonge, 

William ate Brygge, John Tunnere, and John Brenyng, who say that 

Nicholas de Barbeflet held two water-mills in the barton of 
Merleberg in chief of the King, and pays per annum to the King 
one pair of gilt spurs. The said mills are worth per annum \oos. 

The said Nicholas held of the Templars 42 acres of arable land 
in la Berton, and they are worth per annum 26J. 8^., of the which 
he pays per annum to the said Templars 16^-., and so there remains, 
clear, \os. Sd., and he owes suit to the King at the barton. 



2o6 ' Wiltshire 

The said Nicholas held of Henry Tyes in Manton half a knight's 
fee, and it is worth per annum los., of the which he pays to the 
said Henry the service of half a knight's fee when scutage 
shall run. 

Nicholas, son of the said Nicholas, is his next heir, and is of 



full age. 



Chan. Inq. p.m., 23 Edward I, No. 26. 



CHilltam le iHotngne. 

I nCJUlSl tlOn made at Wynterbum Maydynton, in co. Wilts, 
X on Monday next after the Epiphany of the Lord, 23 Edward I 
[129s], of the lands and tenements which were of William le 
Moyngne, by the oath o{ John Burel,John Baiham, Richard Peytevyn, 
Thomas Dauheney, John Faber, Hugh de Lye, Walter le Frye, John 
Edmund, William le Neet, Richard Alward{?), Gilbert Atte Stone, and 
Richard Hupehulle, who say that 

The said William held in chief of the King in the manor of 
Wynterbum Maydynton one capital messuage, and it is worth 
per annum with the curtilage iid. ; also of rent of villeins by 
the year 13J. ^d., to wit, at Michaelmas 6s. Sd. and at Easter 6^. 8^. 
He also held in the same manor one carucate of land, to wit, 
100 acres, price of the acre 2d. : sum, i6,y. 8^. Also one acre 
of meadow, price of the acre 6d. : sum, 6d. Also pasture for 
100 sheep, and it is worth by the year 6s. 8d. : sum, 6s. Sd. Sum 
of the whole, 37J. 6d. 

The said William le Moynge held the said tenements of the King 
in chief by serjeanty, to wit, by the service of being the buyer 
of the kitchen and keeper of the larder of the King, and he held 
nothing of others. 

Henry le Moyngne is the son and next heir of the said William, 
and is aged 40 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 23 Edward I, No. 32. 



i^enr^ De ^torm^. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Borbach on the day of St. Clement 

X the Pope, 24 Edward I [1295], concerning the lands and 

tenements whereof Henry de Stormy died seised in his demesne as 

of fee, etc., etc., by the oath of William de Harden, Peter de Forsehur\ 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 207 

William del Illebon, Nicholas Dymars, John de Berewik, Roger Page, 
William le Chaumberleing, William Gerberd, Geoffrey Droweys, Walter 
le Blak, Adam de Rammebur', and Henry de Bourne, who say that 

The said Henry held of the King in chief the manor of Borbach, 
with the members of Durleygh and Couelesfeld, by the serjeanty 
of finding in the army of the King in Wales one esquire armed, 
and keeping the bailiwick of the King's forest of Savernak. 

There are at Borbach 5 carucates of land, which are worth per 
annum £10. There are at Durleygh 2 virgates in villeinage, and 
they are worth by the year los. And there are i^s. \d. of rent by 
the year in Borbach and Durleye. The bailiwick of the said forest 
is worth per annum 40J. There are at Couelesfeld 8 virgates of 
land, which are worth per annum £\. And 55J. of rent of assize 
by the year. Sum, £ro is. \d. 

Henry, son of the said Henry de Stormy, is his next heir, and is 
^T'^d ?o years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 23 Edward I ^ No. 51. 



i^entt 0on oC auger* 

Writ dated at Aberconewey, 4th April, 23 Edward I [1295]. 

Edward, etc., to the sheriff of Wilts. We command you by the 
oath of good and lawful men of your county diligently to enquire 
whether it be to the damage of us or others if we grant to Henry 
son oi Auger that he may give and assign to the Prior and Convent 
of the brethren of the order of the Preachers of Sarum i\ acres 
of meadow in Fyssherton towards the enlargement of the place 
|]/>/a«(?] of the said brethren in Sarum, to hold to them and their 
successors for ever, or not ; and if so, to what damage, etc., etc. 

^F • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Fissertone on Friday next before the 
X. feast of the Apostles Philip and James, 23 Edward I [1295], 
before Thomas de St. Omer, then sheriff of Wilts, by Edmund Falke, 
John Chamherleyn, Hugh Schyreman, Geoffrey Waryn, Peter Crey, 
Peter de Wodejord, William Oydenot, Adam WilybendiJ), John Richer, 
William le Schonnere, William le Hattere, and Richard le Rinter, who 
say that 

Henry son of Auger is the chief lord and can give that acre and 
a half of meadow to whomsoever he will, and the said Henry holds 
the same of the fee of the Earl of Lincoln, and owes scutage for all 
the tenement which he holds in the said vill when it shall happen. 



2o8 Wiltshire 

And if the said Henry shall happen to die the heir of the said 
Henry ought to remain in the wardship of the Earl oi Lincoln, and 
then the said Earl will lose the value of 2^. by the year for the same 
meadow, and it is not to the damage of the King, neither do they 
know what damage it is to any other, nor in what way any damage 
can occur. 

The lands and tenements remaining to the said Henry suffice for 
the ser\'ice due, because the lands remaining are worth beyond the 
said gift 20 marks yearly, and all other charges, to wit, customs, 
services as well for the said meadow given as for the said lands 
retained, which they sustained nr were wont to sustain as in suits, 
views of frankpledge, aids, tallages, vigils, amercements, con- 
tributions, and other charges whatsoever. And that he may be 
put on assizes, juries, and other recognizances whatsoever, as was 
wont to be done before the said gift. Neither is the country hurt 
by the gift of the said Henry. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 23 Edward I, No. 96. 



— ■ • • • 

I nQUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
X Hugh PrcereU made at Cheleworth on Wednesday next 
before the feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, 24 Edward I [1296], 
by John de Crantebrugg, William Crysp, Thomas Maleward, John 
Nony, William de Molendin\ John Hubbescori, Richard Costard, Henry 
dt Burne, John Colemed . . . , John le Fry, Hugh Chayer, and 
Alexander Bronn, who say that 

The said Hugh held certain lands and tenements in Chelesworth, 
in the hundred of Stepel- [Staple], of the King in chief, by the 
serjeanty of finding one esquire in the King's war for 20 days at his 
own costs. 

There is there a capital messuage with a curtilage . . . , 
and they are worth per annum s^- There are there 97 acres of 
arable land, and they are worth per annum 32J. 4//., price of the 
acre 4^/. Also 33 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum 
66j., price of the acre zs. The pasture there is worth per annum 
6 J. %d. There is there of rent of assize by the year £■] qs. iid., to 
wit, at the feast of St. . . . £4. i^s. bid., at the Nativity of 
the Lord its. i,\d., at Easter zis. 5i</., and at the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist 171. s\d. The works of [the customary 
tenants.'] are worth per annum 32J. The profit of the wood is 
worth per annum with the pannage 20J. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 209 

He held also the moiety of the hundred of Stapele, and it is 
worth per annum i y. \d. 

Sum of the whole extent [blank]. 

The said Hugh in his lifetime gave to . . . oi John Pneral, 
son of the said Hugh, in the name of her dower, the said manor 
except the wood and hundred, paying to him yearly for the said 
manor besides ... 2^. at the four principal terms equally. 

Thomas Peverel, son ol John Peverel, son of the said Hugh, is his 
next heir, and will be i8 years old on the day of St. Dionisius 
next coming. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.^ 24 Edward I, No. 30. 



I nC[UlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
X Fulk de Penbtygge made at Boscumbe on Monday next before 
the feast of St. James, 24 Edward I [1296], by Richard h Heyr, 
Henry Trussehare, William Sylle, John de Bakesham, William le Frye, 
Adam de Adyngton, Richard le Clerk, Robert de Donynlon, Thomas 
Tolle, Robert Alexandre, Alexander Denys, and Henry le Blake ^ who 
say that 

The said Fulk held on the day that he died certain lands and 
tenements in the vill of Tudeworth of the Earl of Oxjord, as of the 
inheritance of the wife of the said Earl, by the service of paying 
\d. yearly at Easter. 

There is there the site of a certain messuage, and it is worth 
per annum \d. There are there 89 acres of arable land, and they 
are worth per annum zis. id., price of the acre id. There is there 
one acre of meadow, and it is worth per annum bd. The pasture 
there is worth per annum z\s. 8d. There is there of rent of 
customary tenants by the year £6, at the four principal terms 
equally. The perquisites of the Court are worth per annum zs. 
Sum of the whole extent, £S 6s. gd. 

Fulk, son of the said Fulk, is his next heir, and will be 5 years 
old on the third day next after the feast of St. Bartholomew next 
coming. 

Isabella, who was the wife of Fulk de Penbrigge, lately deceased, 
who held nothing of the King or others by knight's service, prays 
that the King will give to her the wardship of all the lands and 
tenements which were of the said Fulk and which he held in 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. II. I 4 

1 5 



2IO Wiltshire 

socage, which wardship belongs to her because the next heir of the 
said Fulk is within age, being 5 years old, which said lands and 
tenements were lately taken into the King's hands by the escheator. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.y 24 Edward I, No. 3 1 . 



I nOUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
JL Henry de Ceme, made at Draycote, in the hundred of Sterkele, 
on Wednesday next after the feast of St. Michael, 24 Edward I 
[1296], hy John de Hanekerion, Walter Ryson, Henry Vigerus, John 
de Segre, Richard Bailemundy William Bailemund, John Sturmy, 
Robert ate Boxe, Philip Frye, Thomas Theyn, John de Clatjord, and 
William de Wotton/^hb say that 

The said Henry held certain lands and tenements in the vill of 
Draycote of the King in chief, by the service of paying yearly to 
the King at the feast of St. Michael £-] bs. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden and dovecote, 
and it is worth per annum 10s. There are there 160 acres of 
arable land, and they are worth per annum 40J., price of the acre 
$d. There are there 30 acres of meadow, and they are worth per 
annum 30J. The pasture there is worth per annum los. There 
are there 4 acres of wood, and the profit of the said wood is worth 
by the year 1 2d. There is there of the rent of customary tenants 
by the year, at the feasts of Easter and Michaelmas equally, 
£6 IS. 6d. The works of the customary tenants are worth per 
annum 6s. 8d. The pleas and the perquisites of the court are 
worth by the year is. There is there one water-mill in Winter, 
and it is worth i$s. /{d. Sum, £\i i\s. td. 

John de Ceme, son of the said Henry, is his next heir, and is 

aged 27 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 24 Edward /, No. 39. 



(Gilbert De Clare^, cBarl of d^loucejster ann 
J^ereforD^ 

^r • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 

A Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, in co. Wilts, 

made at Wexcumbe on Monday next after the feast of the Epiphany, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 211 

24 Edward I [1296], by Richard Couenaunt, Robert Oppetras, Richard 
Geruqys, Peter Oliver, Stephen Bayeman, Geoffrey le Cornmangere, 
William le Kalewe, Geoffrey Dol, Walter Semer, As Griffin, John de 
Woltone, and/ohn le Tayllor, who say that 

The said Gilbert held the manor of Wexcumbe and the vill of 
Bedewynde together with the hundred of Kinewardeston of the 
King in chief, by the service of paying into the King's Exchequer 
by the year £-^z. 

There is at Wexcumbe a certain capital messuage with a garden 
and curtilage and a certain small grove, and they are worth per 
annum 6j. %d. There are there 1 64 [? 804] acres of arable land, and 
they are worth per annum £\i %s., each acre \d. Also 15^^ acres of 
meadow, and they are worth per annum is. ^d., price of the acre 6d. 
The pasture there is worth per annum bos. There is there of rent 
of freemen by the year i los. Also of rent of customary tenants by 
the year 104?. id., to be paid at the four principal terms of the 
year equally. 

The works of the said customary tenants are not extended, 
because if they work they will be quit of their rent. Their pleas 
and perquisites by the year are worth 53J. ^d. Sum, £^0 gs. 1 id. 

There is at Bedewynde of rent of assize by the year 40J. gd., to 
be paid at the four principal terms of the year equally. Also of toll 
of the market by the year 22s. Sd. The pleas and perquisites per 
annum are worth 20s. Sum, £^ js. ^d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the hundred of Kynewardeston by 
the year are worth ;^2o. Sum-total, £$^ 14.S. \d. 

Gilbert, son of the said Gilbert, is his next heir, and is aged 
4 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 24 Edward I, No. 107. 



iftm8]&t*0 iffee^ of tl^e €wc\ of dO^louce^ter 

In the Bailiwick of the Honour of Gloucester. 

TnG heirs of William de Sancto Martino hold half a fee in 
Knut, in co. Wilts. 
The heirs ol fohn de Okeling hold 4 parts of one fee there. 
The heirs of Walter de Stormy hold 4 parts of one fee there. 
The heirs of the same William hold one fee in Ordeston, in 
CO. Wilts. 

The heirs of Matilda de Cantelupe hold one fee in Midleston 
in the same. 



2 1 2 Wiltshire 

The heirs of Richard de Dauntsy hold half a fee in Winterborne 
Dauntsey in the same. 

The heirs of Ralph Caluet hold one fee in Eston. 

The heirs of Symon de Eston hold one fee in Eston. 

The heirs oi Richard de Gunyelde hold one fee in Stony Eston. 

The heirs of Richard de H . . . . hold s parts of one fee in 
Tyckenham of the fee of Maresc' in Somerset. 

The heirs of Robert de Meysi hold half a fee in Octon, in 
CO. Wilts, and half a fee in Merston, in the said county. Also one 
fee in Octon, which the heirs of William Tandefeld hold, and one 
fee in Parva Okeburn without Marleberwe, which the heir of Robert 
de Meysi of F . . . . holds. 

The heir of William son of John holds 3 fees in Stanford, in 
CO. Gloucester, and Cemecote, in co. Wilts. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 24 Edward I, No. 107. 



Laurence He ^ncto iHauro. 

I nC[UlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 

X Laurence de St. Mauro made at Malmesbury on Sunday next 

before the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, 

25 Edward I [1297], by John de Kauntebryge, William de Chele, 
Richard de la Coue, Richard Peruaunt, Thomas de Langeforde, William 
de la Hoke, Walter atte Halle, William Baron, Robert de Templo, Roger 
Hasard, Thomas Blakemor, and Robert Aunger, who say that 

The said Laurence held certain lands and tenements in the vill of 
Pulton next Creckelade of the King in chief, by the service of half 
a knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden and a dovecote, 
and it is worth per annum i^s. ^d. There are there 220 [? 420] acres 
of arable land, and they are worth per annum £1, price of the acre 
4</. Also 8 acres of meadow, and they are worth by the year Ss. 
The pasture there is worth by the year 2s. There is there of rent 
of assize by the year at the four principal terms equally, to wit, at 
the Nativity of the Lord, the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, 
the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and St. Michael, ^10 13.?. ^d. 
There is there one windmill, and it is worth per annum i6s. The 
pleas and perquisites of the Court are worth 2s. Sum, ;^i9 14J. Sd. 

Nicholas, son of the said Laurence, is his next heir, and is aged 

26 years and more. 

Chan. Ing. p.m., 25 Edivard I, No. 13. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 213 

T^ • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 

A John de Gola/re on the day that he died, made at Bluntesdone 
■on Sunday in the morrow of the Apostles Peter and Paul, 25 
Edward I [1297], by John Ace, James de Grundewell, James de la 
More, Rolert de Lusteshull, Richard Aylmer, Waleran de WidihuU, 
James le Palmere, Peter de Waletote, John Not, John le Nyiue, Bryan 
Rolerd, Roger Bishop, William de Hyneton, and Hugh Bryan, who 
say that 

The said John held certain lands and tenements in the vill of 
Burybluntesdon of the King in chief of the fee of Curtys, by the 
service of half a knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, and it is worth 
per annum %s. There are there 64 acres of arable land, and they 
are worth per annum z\s. \d., price of the acre 4^.; also 6 acres 
of meadow, and they are worth per annum ts. There is there of 
rent of the free tenants 34^., to wit, at Easter and Michaelmas, by 
equal portions. Also of rent of customary tenants by the year, to 
wit, at Christmas, Easter, Midsummer, and Michaelmas, ^s. The 
works of the same are worth per annum \os. id. The pasture is 
worth per annum zs. The pleas and perquisites are worth per 
annum 2^-. Sum of the whole extent, iioj. 5^. 

Thomas, son of the said John, is his next heir, and is aged 
27 years and more. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 22. 



fiatDertne ^aatnelL 

InCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Katherine Paynel, made at Purynton on Wednesday next after 
the feast of St. Katherine the Virgin, 25 Edward I [1296], by 
Thomas Maleward, Thomas Tyes, William Cryps, John le Frye, Hugh 
Chag, Alexander Bron, Nicholas Archer, William Aubrey, William 
de Molend, John Hobeshort, Richard Costard, and Adam Emald, 
who say that 

The said Katherine held certain lands and tenements in the vill 

of Chelleworth and the eighth part of the hundred of Stapele of the 

King in chief, by the serjeanty of finding one horseman armed 

in the army of the King in Wales at his own costs for 5 days. 

1 5 • 



214 Wiltshire 

There are there 20 acres of arable land, and they are worth per 
annum half a mark. Also 8 acres of meadow, and they are worth 
izs., price of the acre 18^. There is there of rent of assize by the 
year at three terms equally 8^., and at the feast of St. Michael \qs^ 
The works of 2 customars are worth per annum 3^. There is there 
of chersete at the feast of St. Martin 1 2 hens, and they are worth 
ltd. The profit of the wood is is. The perquisites of the hundred 
are worth per annum 3^. The pasture there is worth 3^. 

The said Katherine held certain lands and tenements in the vill 
of Purynton of Robert de Keynes, by the service of paying yearly to 
the said Robert at the feasts of St. Andrew and St. Peter ad 
Vincula xs. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, and it is worth 
per annum half a mark. There are there 64. acres of arable land, 
and they are worth per annum z\s. 4^., price of the acre \d. Also 
10 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum 15^. There is 
there of rent of assize by the year at the feast of St. Michael and at 
hockday 41J. The works of 4 customars are worth per annum 
\y. \d. The pasture there is worth per annum 3^. The pleas and' 
perquisites zs. Sum of the whole extent [blank]. 

Philip Paynel, son of the said Katherine, is her next heir, and is 
aged 25 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edivard I, No. 29. 



2BilUam De iHol^un. 

EXlGnt of the manor of Myldehale, formerly of William de 
Mohun, made there on Wednesday next before the feast of 
St. Laurence, 25 Edward I [1297], hy John de Berwyk, Reginald 
Waz, John de Hardyngton, Peter de Polton, Adam Barbost, Richard 
de Calton, Walter Blak, Thomas Cusyn, Hamo Virgile, Walter Sywardy 
William Frank, William Joup, and John Ate Mere, who say that 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth 13J. i^d. There 
are there 360 acres of arable land, and they are worth per annum 
45 J., price of the acre \\d. Also 24^ acres of meadow, and they 
are worth per annum 49^., price of the acre zs. The pasture there 
is worth per annum 34?. 10^. There is there a certain wood, and 
the profit is worth per annum 4?. The fishing there is worth per 
annum \id. There is there of rent of freemen at the four principal 
terms equally 38J. Also of rent of customars at the said terms 
56X. \\d. And of the rent of cottars at the said terms 42,j'. And 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 215 

of rent of other cottars at the said terms 4J. There are there 4 free 
tenants, and they pay per annum at the said terms yj. bd. The 
works of the customars and cottars are worth per annum 45^. 6^. 
The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth per annum 20s. 
There is also of tallage of 14 cottars at the feast of St. Peter ad 
Vincula 5^. 10^. Also 60 hens of chersete at the feast of St. Martin, 
and they are worth per annum 5^. Also 200 eggs at Easter, and 
they are worth bd. The ploughing of custom is worth per annum 
5 J. 4^. Sum, ^18 1 7 J. \\d. 
There is there the advowson of the Church, and the Church is 

worth per annum £\o. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 43. 



iSicl^arD 0on of 9Io]^n» 

InOUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Richard son oi John, made at Wynterslegh on Saturday next 
before the feast of the Apostles Simon and Jude, 25 Edward I 
[1297], by John the Clerk, Thomas de Gomeledon, William le Nohle^ 
John de Canestede, John le Neyuile, John Sweuynam, William Seuer, 
John Prat, John Cole, John de Cruce, Thomas Walrand, and John 
Goudchild, who say that 

The said Richard held certain lands and tenements in the vill of 
Wynterslegh of the King in chief, by the service of paying yearly to 
the Earl of Cornwall £20, to wit, at Easter and Michaelmas equally. 

The capital messuage with the garden there is worth 8j. There 
are there 190 acres of arable land, and they are worth per annum 
63J. \d., price of the acre 4^. Also 120 acres of poor land, and 
they are worth per annum zos., price of the acre id. Also 9 acres 
of meadow, and they are worth per acre i %5. The pasture there is 
worth per annum 40J. The profit of the wood is worth per annum 
40J. Of rent of freemen and customars at Christmas, Easter, Mid- 
summer, and Michaelmas, equally £q gs. gd., and at Michaelmas 
of rent of one free tenant 4J. The works of the customars are 
worth per annum £6 ys. ii^d. Also of tallage of the same at 
Michaelmas 35^. $d. Also of Tethyngpeny at the view of Hockday 
and at the feast of St. Martin 40J. There is there a certain wind- 
mill, and it is worth per annum los. Also of chersete at the feast 
of St. Martin 88 hens, and they are worth per annum 7^. ^d. The 
pleas and perquisites of the court are worth per annum los. Sum 
of the whole extent ^30 1 3^. yid. And so the said manor is worth, 
clear, ;^io i$s. -jid. 



2i6 Wiltshire 

Concerning the heirs of the said Richard and their heirs, thej 
(the jurors) are ignorant. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward /, No. $oa. 



iStcl^arti ison of 31o]^n» 

TT • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
A Richard son of John, made at Chyriel, in co. Wilts, on 
Monday next after the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist, 25 Edward I 
[1297], ^y Adam le Chamberlayn, Walter de Brudegherd, Gilbert de 
Fynamor, Robert Alfrych, William Coych, Richard Ate/orde, Hugh 
Scheiere, Walter Reymund, William Schoyrt, Robert Thurleby^ Richard 
Thursteyn, and Robert Shetere, who say that 

The said Richard held certain lands and tenements in the vill 
of Chyriel of the King in chief, by the service of one knight's fee. 

The capital messuage there, with the dovecote, garden, and park 
\vivario'], is worth per annum los. There are there 400 acres of 
arable land, and they are worth per annum ;^2o, price of the acre 
lid. Also 35 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum 
70J., price of the acre is. The pasture there is worth per annum 
60^. The profit of the wood there is worth per annum bs. 8d. 
There is there a certain water-mill, and it is worth per annum 40J. 
There is there of rent of free tenants at the feast of St. Michael 
13J. lod. Also of the rent of the same at Easter 13J. ^.d. Also of 
rent of customars at four terms, viz., the feasts of St. Andrew, the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist, and St. Michael, £11 i6s. 4^. The works of the same 
are worth per annum 49^. 8d. Also of tallage of the same at the 
feast of St. Michael 40J. Also of the gift of the same at the view 
of Hockday and the feast of St. Martin zos. There is there of 
chersete at the feast of St. Martin 72 hens, and they are worth 6s. 
There is there i lb. of pepper and 3 lbs. of cummin, and they are 
worth i$d. The pleas and perquisites of the courts are worth 
per annum 6s. 8d. Sum of the whole extent, £^S i^s. -jd, 

Matilda, the eldest of the sisters of the said Richard, whom 
William de Bello Campo, Earl of Warwick, married ; Joan, who was 
the wife of Tebald le Boteler, sister of the said Richard ; Robert de 
Clyfford, kinsman of the said Richard ; Richard de Burgo, Earl of 
Ulster, nephew \jiepos'\ of the said Richard; and Idonea, who was 
the wife of Roger de Leyborn, nephew of the said Richard, are his 
next heirs, and are all of the age of 26 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 50a. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 217 

iHicIjarD J301T of Sloljn. 

"W • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn of the fees and advowsons of Churches 
JL which were of Richard son of John in co. Wilts, made at 
Wilton on Monday next after the feast of St. Michael, 26 Edward I 
1^1298], by William Alaleweyn, Richard le Chauncelur, Robert Burdon, 
Philip le Wolf, John de Molend'' of Merdene, John le Eyr of Patenye, 
William Jordan^ Peter Burgeys, Richard le Blont of Cheverel, John 
■de Molendino, Henry le Vras, and Hugh le Jeuene, who say that 

Adam de la Ryuere held of the said Richard son o^ John on the 
day that he died one messuage and 6 virgates of land in Wode- 
berwe, for the fourth part and the eighth part, and so it will be 
half a knight's fee of one knight's fee by the service of paying 
scutage when it shall happen. 

The capital messuage with the garden and curtilage is worth 
per annum 6s. Sd. 

There are there 96 acres of land, and each acre is worth per 
annum 4^. Sum, 32J. 

Also 2 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth 2s. Sum, 4^. 

There are there 2 free tenants, to wit, John de Grymstede, and 
he holds for his life 18 acres of land and pays nothing, price of 
the acre ^d., sum 6s. ; and William de Schodewell, who holds one 
virgate of land there, to wit, 40 acres, price of the acre 8d. [? 4</.], 
and pays per annum to the said Adam id. at the feast of St. Michael, 
sum 1 3 J. ^d. 

Sum of the whole value of half a knight's fee, 62s. per annum. 

The said Richard son o^ John was the true patron of the Church 
of Wodeberwe, and it is worth per annum 10 marks; also of the 
Church of Wynterslowe, and it is worth per annum 25 marks. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward /, No. ^ib. 



Ctimunt):, €arl of lanca^tet:, brotl)et: of 

Extent of the lands which were o( Edmund, brother of the 
King of England, made at Euerle, in co. Wilts, on Sunday 
next after the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Mary, 
25 Edward I [1297], t>y Peter Croyleboys, Adam de Euerle, John son 
of the said Adam, Richard Gerueys, William Hopegras, John Hamelyn, 
Robert de Everle, William de Lyllebon, Ivo de Kepehulle, Thomas de 
Hurle, Walter Ategrene, and William Parker, who say that 



2 1 8 Wiltshire 

The said Edmund held in his demesne as of fee the manors of 
Everle and Colynggeburn Comitis. 

The capital messuage with the curtilage and dovecote at Everle 
is worth per annum 4J. There are there 524 acres of arable land, 
and they are worth per annum ^8 14J. 8(/., price of the acre 4//. 
Also 80 acres of poor land, and they are worth per annum 13^. ^d.,^ 
price of the acre id. Also 8 acres of meadow, and they are worth 
24J. The pasture there as well in several as in common is worth 
65^. 4</. The profit of the foreign wood and park there is worth 
per annum 35^. The rabbit warren there is worth per annum bos. 
There is there of the rent of free tenants by the year 775. Of rent 
of customars and cottars per annum £^ is. The works and 
customs of the same are worth per annum ;^io ts. id. Of cert 
tallage of the same at the feast of St. Michael 33J. 4^/. The pleas 
and perquisites of the court are worth per annum 63J. i^d. Sum, 
£\\ lys. -jd. 

The capital messuage with the curtilage and dovecote at 
Collynggeborn is worth per annum half a mark. There are there 
600 acres of arable land, and they are worth per annum 
£11 lbs. bd., price of the acre bd. Also 16 acres of meadow, 
and they are worth 40^., price of the acre 2s. bd. The pasture 
there as well in several as in common is worth per annum £j^.. 
The profit of the wood there is worth per annum bos. There is 
there of the rent of free tenants by the year 49J. 10^. Of the rent 
of customars and cottars per annum £^ iSs. ^d. The works of 
the customars and customs are worth per annum ;^i2 19^. s^d. 
The pannage of young oxen and pigs by the year is worth gs. 2d. 
Of tallage of customars at Michaelmas 4.0s. The pleas and 
perquisites of the courts are worth per annum loos. Sum,. 
£S2 igs. lo^d. 

Sum of these two manors, ;^94 17^. s|</. 

CAan. Inq.p.m.i 25 Edward I, No. 51a. 



CDtttunD, c^arl of Lancaster, btotl^er of 

Extent of the knight's fees and advowsons of churches 
which were of Edmund, brother of the King of England, 
made at New Sarum on Tuesday next after the feast of the Puri- 
fication of the Blessed Mary, 26 Edward I [1298], by Nicholas 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 219 

Trenche/oil, Richard Gerueys, Henry Duce, John de Neiherauene, 
Richard Rypon, Thomas le Heyr, John Bedel, Adam de Adyngton, 
William Warde, Hugh Ireys, William Sylle, and Philip de Nyweton, 
who say that 

Henry [^Ho^esey held the manor of Standon of the said Edmund, 
brother of the King, of the honour of Ferrar, by the service of one 
knight's fee, and it is worth per annum ;^2o. 

Emery \_Emericus~\ de Sancto Edmundo held of the said Edmund 
of the honour of Leicester 2 carucates in Hakenestok, by the 
service of the fifth part of a knight's fee, and they are worth per 
annum ^10. 

John de Flemyng held in the same vill of the said Edmund of the 
said honour 2 carucates of land, by the service of the fifth part of 
a knight's fee, and they are worth per annum £\o. 

John de Brommore held of the said Edmund of the said honour 
certain lands and tenements in Cumpton, by the service of the 
third part of a knight's fee, and they are worth per annum £ib. 

Simon de Combe held of the said Edmund of the said honour 
certain lands and tenements in the said vill, by the service of the 
sixth part of a knight's fee, and they are worth per annum tos. 

John Barit held of the said Edmund of the said honour certain 
lands and tenements in Aleton, by the service of half a knight's 
fee, and they are worth per annum loos. 

The said Edmund had no advowsons of churches in co. Wilts 
on the day that he died. 

Sum of the fees : 2 fees and the fourth part and the seventh part. 

Sum of the value of the same, £i\. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 51^. 



Writ dated at Westminster, 25th October, 25 Edward I [1297], 
commanding the sheriff to enquire if it be to the damage of the 
King or others if the King should grant to Isabella Pipard that she 
may give to the Abbess and Convent of Lacok the manor of Meg- 
hyndon : to hold to them and their successors for ever. 

T^ • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn made at Malmesbury on Tuesday next after 

JL the feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 26 Edward I [1298], 

before W. de Paveli, sheriff of Wiltshire, by Richard Baylemond, 

William Baylemond, Roger Bernard, William de Dudejord, Roger de 



2 20 Wiltshire 

Brade/eld, William Scolate, John de Molendino, Richard Hun/ray, 
John Bluet, Thomas le Hengleys, Reginald Koyli, Herrit de la 
Trouwe, William Tethyngedon, Philip le Frye^ Roger de la Lupe, and 
Gilbert Fraunceys, who say that 

If Isabella Pipard gave her manor of Meghyndon to the Abbess 
and Convent of Lacoc it would be to the damage of the King of zs. 
per annum for suits and services due at the hundred of Kingbrygge, 
and to the damage of Master John Gereberd of Edestoke, of whom 
the said manor is held, as in wards, marriages, reliefs, and other 
services, and to the prejudice of the heirs of William Gereberd, 
father of the said John Gereberd. 

The said manor is worth per annum loos. 

The said Isabella has no lands or tenements elsewhere except in 
dower, whereby the heirs of the said Isabella may or ought to be 
put on assizes or juries. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 54. 



miUiam De ^ancto iHauro^ felon, 

•w- • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made before Walter de Pavely, then sheriff of 
X Wilts, by writ of the lord the King at New Sarum, on Friday 
next after the feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, 25 Edward I [1297], 
by the oath of Roger Styue, Roger de Thornhull, William de Lyllebon, 
William de Stock, William de la More, Peter Croylleboys, Walter Duce, 
William le Chamberleyn, Philip Sturmy, William Waryn, Ivo de 
Kepehull, and John Atte Mulle, whether one messuage and the 
moiety of one virgate of land in Clyve Pypard which William de 
Sancto Mauro, who was outlawed for felony as it is said, held, 
were in the King's hands for one year and one day or not, and 
of whom he held that messuage and land, etc., who say that 

The said William oj St. Mauro was outlawed for felony, and that 
the said messuage and land were in the hand of the tithing man of 
Clyve Pypard for one year and one day, and still are, and that 
the said tithing man shall answer to the King for the issues. 

The said William held the said messuage and land of Roger de 
Cobeham, who is the chief lord of that fee. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 66. 



Inqtiisitiones Post Mortem. 221 

Writ dated at St. Edmunds, 12th November, 24 Edward I 
[1296]. 

Edward, etc., to Malcolm de Harley, escheator on this side the 
Trent. 

By the plaint of Margery, who was the wife of Hugh Peverel, we 
understand that whereas the said Hugh and Margery held on the 
day of the death of the said Hugh one messuage and one carucate 
of land in Parva Domberham of the inheritance of the said Margery, 
and were in full and peaceful seisin thereof on that day, yet never- 
theless you took the said messuage and land, together with other 
'ands and tenements whereof the said Hugh was seised in his 
demesne as of fee, into our hand by the death of the said Hugh, 
and unjustly detain them from the said Margery, to her no small 
iiurt. We therefore command you, as we wish to be fully certified 
;hereof and to do what is just to the said Margery, diligently to 
enquire whether the said premises are of the inheritance of the 
said Margery, as she says, and if the said Hugh and Margery 
were thereof seised when the said Hugh died, etc., etc. 



InCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which Hugh 
Peverel formerly held in Parva Domerham, made in the 
'f'ame vill on Thursday next after the feast of the Circumcision 
of the Lord, 25 Edward I [1297], by Robert Peytevyn, Robert de Aula, 
Robert de la Hyde, Robert de Horsile, Robert le Chamberlayn, Robert 
Faber, Geoffrey Co/, Nicholas le Wode, William Knytgh, Thomas le 
Long, Robert the Clerk, and Richard Vpehille, who say that 

The lands and tenements which the said Hugh held in Parva 
Domerham are of the inheritance of Margery Peverel, wife of the 
said Hugh, and that the said Margery continued her seisin therein 
together with the said Hugh her husband up to the day of his 
death. The said lands and tenements are held of Reginald de 
St. Martin by the service of the eighth part of a knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, and it is worth 
per annum zs. There are there 48 acres of arable land, and they 
are worth per annum %s., price of the acre zd. Also one acre of 
meadow, and it is worth per annum \zd. The pasture there is 
worth \zd. There is there of rent of assize by the year \bs. at the 
four principal terms. The works of 2 customars are worth zs. 
Sum of the whole extent, 30J. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 25 Edward I, No. 74. 



222 



Wiltshire 



mtlltam ue ^^utton. 

I* • • 
nqUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
William de Puttotiy made at the Cross of Dubenel on Wednes- 
day next before the feast of St. Clement, 26 Edward I [1297]* 
by Benedict de Clarugge^ Thomas Brykevile, John Flaundres, Richard 
atte Mere, Ralph Loueraz, John Dunz, Thomas Wale, Waller Lumbard, 
John de Lucy, Thomas de Benner, Thomas de Gomelodon^ John Hulon^ 
Hugh le Yonge, Adam Frankleyn, Henry de Heraz, and John de 
NeyvilCf who say that 

The said William held certain lands and tenements in the vill of 
Putton, in co. Wilts, of the King in chief, by the service of paying 
yearly to the bailiff of Claryndon, to the use of the King, los. at 
the feast of St. Michael, and by the service of keeping a certain 
wood which is called Bobhate(?), in the forest of Claryndon, and 
also keeping with one man the said forest of Claryndon. 

There is at Putton a certain messuage, and it is worth per annum 
i%d. There are there 40 acres of arable land, and they are worth 
per annum half a mark, price of the acre 2d. There is there a 
certain meadow, and it is worth per annum iid. The pasture 
there is worth per annum 5^. The profit of the said bailiwick in 
Claryndon is worth per annum 4J. 

The said William held in the field of Berghton, in co. South- 
ampton, of the King in chief, by the said service, 40 acres of land, 
and they are worth per annum \od. The pasture there is worth 
per annum 2^. The said William held in the said vill one messuage 
and 60 acres of arable land of Adam de Quercu and other divers 
lords, by the service of paying yearly to the said Adam and the 
other lords half a mark. The said messuage is worth per annum 
\s., and the said 60 acres of land los., price of the acre zd. There 
are there 2 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum zs. 

Sum of the whole extent, 39J. id. 

John de Putton, son of the said William, is his next heir, and is 

aged 26 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 26 Edward I, No. 17. 



iHiltcent De iHoute aito» 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Calne on Thursday next before the 

M. feast of St. Peter which is called Cathedra, 27 Edward I 

[1299], of the lands and tenements of the which Milisent de Monte 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 223 

Alto was seised in her demesne as of fee in co. Wilts, by the oath 
of Hugh de Carswille, Adam Chamberleyn, Walter de Compton, Robert 
Alfrich, Walter de Brudesherd, William de Chel/urste, Roger Bulbe, 
William Percehqy, Richard de Cumerwell, Roger de Pekyngill, Robert 
Bardeneye, and Adam Hardy ng, who say that 

Calstone. 

The said Milisent died seised in her demesne as of fee of the 
manor of Calstone in the said county, and held the same of the 
King in chief by the service of half a knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth per annum %s. 
There is there a dovecote, and it is worth per annum — . There 
are there 2 carucates of land containing 100 acres of land by 
the smaller number, and each acre is worth per annum \d. : sum, 
3 3 J. \d. Also 18 acres of meadow, and each acre is worth per 
annum \M.\ sum, 275. There is there a certain several pasture 
in divers places, and it is worth per annum \is. bd. Also a certain 
wood containing 6 acres, the profit whereof is worth per annum 4^. 
Also the rent of assize of the free tenants, to wit, William le Scriveyn 
holds freely half a virgate of land, by the service of paying by the 
year 5^. at the feasts of St. Michael, St. Thomas the Apostle, the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, and St. John the Baptist 
equally. Adam le Chamberleyn holds one carucate of land by the 
service of paying per annum at the feast of St. Michael 8j., at 
the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle 7^. qd., at the Annunciation 
of the Blessed Mary 7^-. qd., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist 
7^. qd. : sum, 31^. ^d. John de Lewestone holds one messuage and 
2 acres of land by the service of paying per annum 5^. at the said 
four terms equally. Philip son of Henry holds one virgate of land 
by the service of paying by the year loj. at the said four terms 
equally. William Asser holds one messuage by the service of paying 
per annum $s. at the said four terms equally. Hugh le Schetere holds 
one virgate of land by the service of paying per annum qs. at the 
said four terms equally, and at the feast of St. Michael for another 
tenement is. Walter de Bredeszerde holds one virgate of land by 
the service of paying per annum 7J. at the said four terms equally. 
Richard Pynel holds half a virgate of land by the service of paying 
per annum bs. at the said four terms equally. Ralph de la Bamdemulle 
holds one water-mill and one acre of land by the service of paying 
by the year i is. 4^. at the said four terms equally. John le Chenyr 
holds 4 crofts for the term of her life, paying per annum 6s. at the 
said four terms equally. The Earl of Warwick holds one meadow 
by the service of paying per annum at the feast of St. Michael id. 



224 Wiltshire 

Bartholomew atte Goych holds half a virgate of land and one acre 
of meadow by the service of paying per annum 34J. at the said 
four terms equally. There are there 6 holders of virgates \yirgatar\ 
each of whom pays per annum \os. at the said four terms equally: 
sum, 605-. Also 5 holders of half-virgates, each of whom pays 
per annum 5^. at the said four terms equally: sum, 255'. Also one 
holder of a virgate, and he pays per annum 7^. bd. at the said 
four terms equally. Also 2 holders of half-virgates, each of whom 
pays per annum y. 9</. at the said four terms equally: sum, 7^. 6</. 
There is there one holder of half a virgate, and he pays per annum 
4J. at the said four terms equally. There are there 6 customars each 
of whom pays by the year 35. \d. at the said four terms equally : 
sum, 20J. Also 2 customars each of whom pays per annum ^s. bd. 
at the said four terms equally : sum, 3J. There is there one servile 
tenant or cottar \coieruUus\ and he pays per annum zs. id. at 
the said four terms equally. Also 3 cottars, each of whom pays 
per annum izd. at the said four terms equally: sum, 3J. Also one 
cottar, and he pays per annum 3J. at the said four terms equally. 
Also one cottar, and he pays by the year at the said four terms 
18^. equally. Also one cottar, and he pays per annum 4^/. 
at the said four terms equally. Also one cottar, and he pays 
per annum 3J. zd. at the said four terms equally. Also one 
cottar, and he pays per annum is. at the said four terms equally. 
Also one other cottar, and he pays per annum 2^. at the said 
four terms equally. Thirteen of the said customars shall give 
chersete at the feast of St. Martin, to wit, each of them one cock 
and 3 hens, worth i\d. Fourteen of the said customars ought to 
mow the lord's meadow, and the mowing of the same is worth 3^. 6d. 
Also they shall carry the hay from the said meadow, or they shall 
give IS. ^d. Twenty-eight of the said customars shall reap in the 
Autumn for one day, and the work of each is worth beyond 
reprise id.: sum, is. ^d. The whole tithing gives yearly at the 
view of frankpledge at the feast of St. IMartin lo^., and at Hokeday 
10s.: sum, 10s. There is there one water-mill, and it is worth 
per annum los. The pannage of pigs is worth per annum at the 
feast of St. Martin i id. The pleas and perquisites are worth per 
annum iid. Sum of the whole value of the said manor, ;i^22 is. %^d. 
William la Soche is the son and next heir of the said Milisent, 
and was aged 21 years on the i8th day of December in the year 

abovesaid. 

Calne. 
The jurors above-named say that the said Milisent held of the 
King at fee farm on the day that she died the hundred foreign 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 225 

and intrinsic of Calne, and a certain part of the borough of Calne, 
and of a certain hamlet called Bor', for ;^i5, to be paid per annum 
at the King's Exchequer, to wit, at Easter and Michaelmas equally. 

The pleas and perquisites of the said hundred are worth per 
annum zos. There is there of the rent of assize of cert money 
belonging to the said hundred, to wit, 20J. at the feast of St. Martin 
and zos. at Hockeday equally. The toll of the market is worth per 
annum 30J, There is there a certain " fear," and it is worth per 
annum zs. Also a water-mill, and it is worth per annum 50J. 
Also a certain aid which is called sheriff's aid of cert money, \\s. 
at the feast of St. Michael. There are there 47 burgesses, who 
pay per annum at Michaelmas 33J. ^. 

There is at Bor' the rent of assize of free tenants, to wit, of 
William Scripior, who holds 20 acres of land by the service of 
paying per annum 7^. bd. at the feasts of St. Michael, St. Thomas the 
Apostle, the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, and St. John the 
Baptist equally. William de Chel/hurste holds 40 acres of land by 
the service of paying per annum 7^. 6d. at the said four terms 
equally. Roger Weybole holds the fourth part of one virgate of land 
by the service of paying per annum 2^. at the said four terms equally. 
Nicholas Asser holds one croft by the service of paying per annum at 
the feast of St. Michael is^d., at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle 
6f</., at the Annunciation 15!^., and at the feast of St. John the 
Baptist d^d. : sum ^s. g</. There are there 4 customars, each of 
whom holds one virgate of land, and pays per annum 10s. at the 
said four terms equally : sum 40J. There are there 4 acres of 
meadow, and each acre is worth is. : sum Ss. 

Sum of the extent, £12 i^s. id. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 JLdward I, No. 50. 



I nCJUlSltlOn made at Sarum on Wednesday next before 
J. the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, 27 Edward I [1299], 
of the lands and tenements of the which Alan de Plokenet was seised 
in his demesne as of fee in co. Wilts on the day that he died, by 
the oath of William le Dun, Thomas le Chamberleyn, Thomas le Rede^ 
Henry le Frye, Walter le Warde, Waller Thomas, Thomas de Benneyr, 
John Hulon, John de Caneford, Adam le Frankeleyn, John Cole, and 
Henry Haraz, who say that 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. II. I 5 



226 Wilts hire 

The said Alan was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day 
that he died of the manors of Langeford, Mobbevyle, Whaddene, 
and Westharham, in the said county. The said Alan held nothing 
of the King in chief in the said county, but he held the said manors 
of the heir of Robert Walrand, who is in the wardship of the King, 
for half a knight's, fee by knight's service. 

Langeford. 

The site of the court of Langeford, with the garden and curtilage, 
is worth per annum zs. There is there one carucate of land in the 
demesne containing 80 acres of land, and each acre is worth per 
annum \d. : sum 26^. %d. There are there 40 acres of land, and 
each acre is worth per annum id.: sum 6j. 8^. Also 14 acres of 
meadow in the demesne, and each acre is worth zs. per annum : 
sum z%s. There is there a certain several pasture in the demesne, 
and it is worth per annum 3^. There is there of the rent of assize 
of free tenants, to wit, of Walter Warde, who holds one virgate of 
land by the service of paying per annum at the feast of St. Michael 
I OS., and at the Nativity of the Lord i lb. of cummin : sum los. o\d. 
Walter atte Brigge holds freely half a virgate of land by the service 
of paying per annum at the feast of St. Michael ts. id., and at the 
Nativity of the Lord z\d. : sum 6j. ^\d. Walter Thomas holds freely 
9 acres of land by the service of paying per annum i lb. of pepper 
at the feast of St. Michael: sum \zd. John de Molendino holds 
freely 6 acres of land by the service of paying per annum 3J..at the 
feast of St. Michael, the Purification of the Blessed Mary, Hockday, 
and the feast of St. John the Baptist equally. John Aygnel holds 
5 acres of land freely by the service of paying per annum at the 
feast of St. Michael i zd. Margeria de Kyngesmull holds free one 
meadow by the service of paying per annum at the feast of 
St. Michael td. William le Dun holds freely 5 acres of land by 
the service of paying per annum at the feast of St. Michael izd. 
Henry de Glaston 15^ acres of land there by the service of paying 
per annum at the feast of St. Michael \\ lbs. of cummin : sum \d. 

There are there 3 customars, each of whom holds one messuage 
and 8 acres of land, and pays per annum at the feast of St. Michael 
5 J., and one of them pays at the same term 6d. more : sum \$s. bd. 
Also each of them gives at the feast of St. Martin for chersete 
one cock and 3 hens, and they are worth 4^. : sum i zd. There 
are there 10 cottars [coterelli\ and they pay per annum at the 
feast of St. Michael zos. Also each of them gives at the feast of 
St. Martin one cock and 3 hens, and they are worth per annum 4</. : 
sum 3^. ^d. There is there one water-mill, and it is worth per 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 227 

<innum i>s. Sd. The pleas and perquisites there are worth 2s. 
per annum. Sum of the value of the said manor by the year, 
jCt jSs. 2id. 

Whadden. 

The capital messuage of the said manor of Whaddene with the 
garden and curtilage is worth per annum zs. There is there one 
carucate of land in the demesne containing 100 acres of land, and 
each acre is worth by the year 2d. : sum 16s. Sd. There are there 
20 acres of meadow in the demesne, and each acre is worth per 
annum i2d. : sum 20s. There is there a certain several pasture in 
the demesne, and it is worth per annum 3^. There is there of the 
rent of assize of free tenants, to wit, Walter Tropynel holds half 
a virgate of land by the service of paying per annum at the feast of 
St. Michael i lb. of pepper: sum \zd. Roger Tropynel holds half 
a virgate of land by the service of paying per annum at the feast of 
St. Michael bd. William Louetok holds 3 acres of land by the service 
of paying per annum i zd. at two terms, to wit, at the Annunciation 
■of the Blessed Mary and at the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed 
Mary equally. Robert le Poleter holds freely one virgate of land by 
the service of paying per annum 13J. \d. at the said two terms. 
James Edmond holds half a virgate of land by the service of making 
two suits by the year. 

There are there 6 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate 
of land and pays per annum ^s. at the said two terms : sum 3CW. 
Each of them shall plough 2 acres of land at the winter sowing or 
at " ramag," or shall give Zd. : sum 4^. There are there 7 customars, 
€ach of whom holds 10 acres of land and pays at the said two terms 
of the year zs. td. : sum ijs. 6d. Each of them shall give at the 
feast of St. Martin one cock and 3 hens, and they are worth per 
annum ^.d. : sum zs. 4*/. Each of the said 6 and 7 customars shall 
give per annum for works in Autumn zs. : sum z6s. There are 
there 4 cottars, and they pay per annum at the said two terms 
equally 8^. Two of them owe for chersete, to wit, at the feast of 
St. Martin each of them one hen, price id. : sum zd. All the said 
customars and cottars shall give at the feast of St. Martin to the 
larder 6s. Sd. The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum 
2s. There is there a certain free chapel the gift whereof belongs 
to the lord, and it is worth per annum 5 marks. Sum of the 
value of the said manor, £-] i^s. zd. 

Westharham. 

The capital messuage of the said manor of Westharham with the 
garden is worth per annum 1 zd. There is there one dovecote, and 



228 Wiltshire 

it is worth per annum 3^. Also one carucate of land containing- 
142 acres of land, and each acre is worth per annum 4//. : sum 
47^. \d. There are there 14 acres of meadow in the demesne, and 
each acre is worth per annum zs. : sum 28J. There is there a 
certain several pasture in the demesne, and it is worth per annum 
17J. id. There is there the rent of assize of free tenants, to wit,. 
Richard Pynnok holds 4^ virgates of land, one water-mill, and one 
fulling-mill, by the service of paying per annum 40J. id., to wit, 
at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer equally. Robert 
Edmond holds 2 virgates of land by the service of paying per annum 
2 lbs. of wax at Michaelmas: sum \zd. Vincent Grount \J Gromet'] 
holds half an acre of land by the service of paying per annum at 
Michaelmas bd. Stephen de Bryghtmerstone holds 3 virgates of land 
by the service of paying per annum at Michaelmas \d. Richard de 
Lutegarshale holds 2 virgates of land by the service of paying id. 
at Michaelmas. Matilda Husee holds one place of land by the 
service of paying per annum 1 lb. of wax at Michaelmas : sum td. 
The Master of the Hospital of St. Nicholas of Sarum holds 
6 bovates of land at Gerardestone by the service of paying per 
annum dd. and i lb. of cummin worth \d. : sum 6^d. Henry Ancher 
holds one meadow and one pond by the service of paying per 
annum 7 sticks of eels and 7 " shafteles " or y. at the feast of 
All Saints, and by the service of ploughing one acre of wheat and 
one acre of barley, and the ploughing of the same is worth 4</. 
beyond reprise : sum 3 j. \d. John de Stanton holds 5 virgates of 
land for the term of his life by the service of paying per annum 
one gillyflower at Michaelmas. 

There are there three customars, each of whom holds 14 acres 
of land and pays per annum los. at Michaelmas, Christmas, 
Easter, and Midsummer equally ; one of them pays per annum i id. 
at the said four terms : sum 31J. There are there 9 holding half- 
virgates, each of whom pays per annum 5J. [} i5<^.] at the said four 
terms equally : sum 1 is. ^d. There is there one customar who holds 
one croft and 3 acres of land by the service of paying per annum 6^. 
at the said four terms equally. Also one customar who holds one 
acre of land by the service of paying per annum 1 8(/. at the said four 
terms equally. Also one cottar who holds one place of land, and 
pays per annum is. id. at the said terms. Also one cottar who pays 
per annum for one cottage 3J. at the said four terms. All the said 
customars and cottars give at the view of frankpledge by the year 
at the feast of St. Martin 2^., and at Hockday is. : sum \s. There 
is there one water-mill, and it is worth per annum 26J. %d. The 
pleas and perquisites are worth per annum is. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 229 

Sum of the value of the said manor, £\\ 10s. y^d. 
Alan de Plokenet is the son and next heir of the said Alan^ and is 
aged 22 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 Edward I , No. 54. 



aian De i^lofeenet 

•W- V • « 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Sarum on Wednesday next before 
-L the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, 27 Edward I [1299], 
of the manor of Saltertone in co. Wilts, of the which Alan de 
Plokenet was seised on the day that he died, by the oath of William 
le Dun, Thomas le Chamberleyn, Thomas le Rede, Henry le Frye, 
Walter Warde, Walter Thomas, Thomas de Beuver, John Hulon, John 
de Caneforde, Adam le Frankeleyn, John Cole, and Henry Haraz, 
who say that 

The said Alan held the said manor at the will of the King and 
of the demise of the King for the sustentation of John Walerand, 
heir o( Robert Walerand. 

The capital messuage of the said manor with the garden is 
worth per annum iid. There is there a dovecote, and it is worth 
per annum i8d. There are there 2 carucates of land containing 
140 acres of land, and each acre is worth per annum 2d.: sura 

2 3 J. 4d. There are there 18 acres of meadow in the demesne, and 
each acre is worth per annum 2s. : sum 36^. The demesne pasture 
on the hill is worth per annum 12^. There is there the rent of 
assize of free tenants, to wit, of William Rouk, who holds half a 
virgate of land by the service of paying bs. at the feasts of St. Michael, 
the Purification of the Blessed Mary, and Pentecost, equally. 
Clarice de Nywetone holds one virgate of land by the service of 
paying per annum at the said 3 terms los. equally. 

CUSTOMARS. 

There are there 15 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate 
of land containing 20 acres, and pays per annum $s. at the said 

3 terms equally : sum 75J. Also each of them gives for autumnal 
works 2S. Sd. at the feast of St. Michael : sum 40J. There are 
there 3 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate of land, and 
they pay in common 20s. at Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer 
equally. They also give by the year to the larder at the feast of 
St. Nicholas 3^. There are the 3 cottars, each of whom pays 
per annum 2s. at the feasts of St. Michael, the Purification of the 

1 6 • 



230 Wiltshire 

Blessed Mary, and Pentecost, equally : sum ts. One cottar of 
the aforesaid 3 cottars pays per annum ds. at the said 3 terms 
equally. Two of the said cottars give chersete at the feast of 
St. Martin, to wit, one of them one cock and 2 hens, and the other 
one cock and one hen, and they are worth ^d. Each of the 3 gives 
for autumnal works at Michaelmas %d. : sum 2^. There are there 
2 cottars, and each of them gives at the said 3 terms iid. : sum ts. 
Each of them gives at the feast of St. Martin one cock and one 
hen, and they are worth zd. : sum 4^. All the said customars- 
give yearly at the feast of St. Nicholas iSs. S^d. to the larder. 
All the said customars give yearly for a certain meadow 3J. at 
Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer. The pleas and 
perquisites are worth per annum izd. 

Sum of the value of the said manor, £1^ yj. ^^d. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 27 Edward I ^ No. 54. 



9Iot)tt CD^ifiarD^ of TirumejsfelD. 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Wilton before the King's escheator,. 
X 14th July, 27 Edward I [1299], by William de Bradefordy 
Hugh Cook, Reginald Kyng, Reginald le Erl, Walter Will, Henry de 
Comerwille, Thomas Roylly, John Bakham, Richard Petevyn, William 
Synnebury, William de Wyly, and Waller Skat, of the lands and 
tenements of the which John Giffard, of Brumesfeld, was seised in 
his demesne as of fee in co. Wilts on the day that he died, who 
say that 

The s?L\d/ohn died seised in his demesne as of fee of the manors of 
Scharenton, VVynterborne Eliston, Orchestone St. George, Aysstone, 
and Broztone, in co. Wilts. He held the said manors of Scharentone, 
Wynterborne Eliston, and one carucate of land in Orchestone 
St. George of the King in chief by the barony of doing for the 
King for the said manors, together with other manors in other 
counties, the services of 3 knights' fees in his Army. He held 
the manor of Aystone of John Mautravers by the service of half 
a knight's fee ; and the manor of Broztone of the heirs of Walter 
de Dunstervile by the service of paying per annum 6 barbed arrows. 

Scharenton. 

The capital messuage with the garden there is worth per annum 
4?. There are there 3 carucates of arable land containing 380 
acres, price of the acre ^d. : sum ^4 15 J. There are there 6 acres 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 231 

of meadow, which are worth per annum 6j., price of the acre \zd. : 
sum 6j. There is there one water-mill, and it is worth per annum 
ts. 8d. Also a certain wood, the profit whereof is worth per annum 
6s. 8d. There is there also the rent of assize of free tenants, to 
wit, Richard le Cu holds 2^ virgates of land, and the virgate 
contains 20 acres, by the service of paying per annum los. at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary and the feast of St. Michael 
equally, and id. at Easter, and he owes suit from 3 weeks to 
3 weeks. Joan Russel holds one virgate of land by the service of 
paying by the year bs. Sd. at the said 2 terms equally. William 
Auger holds one virgate of land by the service of doing suit as 
above. John le Ku holds 3 acres of land by the service of paying 
by the year i lb. of pepper, price td., at the feast of St. Michael, 
and he owes suit as above. Richard de Langeford holds one virgate 
of land by the service of paying by the year \os. at the said 2 terms 
equally, and he owes suit as above. Gilbert Molend' holds one 
messuage with a curtilage by the service of paying per annum is. 
at the said terms equally. Roger Cole holds one virgate of land 
by the service of paying per annum %s. at the said terms, and he 
owes suit as above. Alexander Oiffard holds 2 virgates of land and 
one wood by the service of paying per annum i -^d. at the feast of 
St. Michael, and he owes suit as above. John Bordeyn holds 
2 virgates of land and one water-mill by the service of paying 
per annum bd. at the said terms, and he owes suit as above. 
Sum, £"] i-js. id. 

Custom ARS. 

There are there 6 holding half-virgates, and each of them pays 
6d. at the said terms : sum 3^. And each of them shall give of 
chersete at the feast of St. Martin one cock and 5 hens, and they 
are worth 6d. : sum ^s. And each of them shall work every other 
day from the feast of St. Michael up to the gule of August, except 
the weeks of Christmas, Easter, and Pentecost, and except Sundays 
and feast days, and the work of each by the day is worth ^d. : 
sum 1 2s. ^d. And each of them shall work from the gule of August 
up to the feast of St. Michael each day, and the work of each is 
worth by the day ^d. : sum 8j. 9^. There are there 5 keepers of 
houses or farms (Wykenar), each of whom holds half a virgate 
of land, and each of them shall weed i\ acres, and the work of each 
is worth by the day ^d. : sum ']^d. And each of them shall wash 
and shear the lord's sheep, and the work of each is worth ^d. : 
sum z\d. And each of them shall mow the meadow and carry the 
hay for 7 days, and the work of each is worth by the day ^d. beyond 



232 Wiltshire 

reprise : sum i "j^d. And each of them shall give for their works 
in Autumn 1 8^. at the feast of St. Michael : sum 7 j. bd. There is 
there one holder of half a virgate, and he pays per annum 5^. at 
the said 2 terms equally, and shall give for chersete one cock and 
5 hens, price 6d., and shall wash and shear the lord's sheep, and 
the work is worth \d. And he shall mow the meadow and carry 
the hay for 7 days, and the work is worth by the day \d. 

There are there 4 cottars, each of whom pays per annum i %d. at 
the said terms : sum ds. And each of them shall give for chersete 
one cock and one hen, and they are worth 2d. : sum Zd. And 
each of them shall weed li acres, and the work of each is worth 
\\d. : sum 6d. And each of them shall wash and shear the lord's 
sheep, and the work of each is worth id. : sum 2d. And each of 
them shall give for his works in Autumn gd. : sum 3J. There are 
there 2 cottars, and each of them pays per annum 2s. at the said 
2 terms equally. And they shall give chersete and do in all things 
like one of the said 4 cottars. All the aforesaid, as well holders 
of half-virgates as cottars, shall give at Easter, to wit, each of them 
20 eggs, price id. : sum S^d. 

All of the aforesaid shall give at the feast of St. Michael to the 
larder 26s. Sd. The pleas and perquisites are wofth per annum 3^. 
There is there a certain church, the gift whereof belongs to the 
said manor, and it is worth per annum 10 marks : sum £4. gs. jd. 

Sum of the whole manor, ;^i2 6s. gd. 

Wynterborn Eliston. 

The capital messuage there is worth per annum 2s. There are 
there 2 customary lands containing 240 acres of arable land, and 
they are worth 40J., price of the acre 2d. Also 5 acres of meadow, 
and they are worth js. 6d., price of the acre iSd. There is there 
a certain several pasture, and it is worth per annum 33J. 4*/. Also 
the rent of assize of free tenants, to wit, Alexander Giffard holds 
2 virgates of land, containing 48 acres and one wood, by the service 
of paying per annum 13^. at the feast of St. Michael. John de 
Boham holds 4 virgates of land by the service of paying per annum 
1 2s. at the said term. Lawrence Tredegold holds a certain piece of 
land, and pays per annum 5^. at the said terms. 

Custom ARS. 

There are there 4 holders of virgates, and each of them pays by 
the year 73-. at the feast of St. Michael and at the Annunciation of 
the Blessed Mary equally : sum 28J. And each of them shall wash 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 233 

and shear the lord's sheep, and the work of each one is worth \d. : 
sum id. And each of them shall work from the feast of the Nativity 
of St. John the Baptist up to the gule of August every other day, 
except Sundays and feast days, and the work of each of them is 
worth by the day \d. : sum \%d. And each of them shall give for 
his works in Autumn \zd. : sum 4-r. 

There are there 12 holders of half-virgates, each of whom pays 
per annum zs. 6d, at the said terms equally, and shall work from 
the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist up to the feast of 
St. Michael every day, except Sundays and feast days, and the work 
of each by the day is worth \d. Sum of the rents 30J. ; sum of 
the works 15J. 

There is there one cottar, and he pays per annum iid. at the 
said terms, and shall work in all things like the said 12 holders of 
half-virgates: sum of the works i^d. All the said customars, as 
well holders of virgates as holders of half-virgates, shall give to 
the larder at the feast of St. Michael los. 

The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum ltd. 

Sum of the whole manor, £^i zs. lod. 

Orcheston. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth per annum 10s. 
There is there one carucate of land containing no acres of land, 
and it is worth iSs. ^d. : price of the acre id. There is there one 
acre of meadow, and it is worth per annum i%d. Also a certain 
several pasture, and it is worth per annum i^s. 4^. There is there 
the rent of assize of the free tenants, to wit, Walter Soher holds 
half a virgate of land by the service of doing suit for the lord of 
Orchestone at the hundred of Hetthdresburye. John de Brudemere 
holds one messuage and 4 acres of land by the service of paying 
per annum 6^. %d. at the said term, and doing suit at the hundred 
of Coleffeld. William Kyng holds 2 acres of land by the service 
of paying yearly is. 8d. at the said terms equally. Walter le Goldene 
holds one messuage with a curtilage by the service of paying per 
annum 3J. at the said 2 terms equally. Julian Poniieri{}) holds 
i^ acres of meadow by the service of paying per annum is. at the 
said terms equally. Simon Semer holds one messuage with a 
curtilage by the service of paying yearly bs. at the said terms 
equally. William Bisshop holds 1 1 acres of land by the service of 
paying per annum 16^/. at the feast of St. Michael. There is there 
a certain church, the gift whereof belongs to the said manor, and 
it is worth per annum 20 marks. 
Sum of the whole manor, 64^. lod. 



234 Wiltshire 

Broztone. 

The capital messuage with a garden is worth per annum ts. %d. 
There are there 3 carucates of land containing 310 acres of arable 
land, and they are worth per annum 77J. zd., price of the acre 3</. 
There is there a certain wood, the profit whereof is worth per 
annum los. Also a dovecote, and it is worth per annum zs. Also 
a water-mill, and it is worth per annum $s. There is there the rent 
of assize of free tenants, to vi'ii, John le Comerwille holds 2 carucates 
of land by the service of doing suit from 3 weeks, etc. Hugh le 
Cu holds one messuage and one virgate of land by the service of 
paying per annum id. at the feast of St. Michael, and he owes suit 
as above. Thomas atte Stonhuse holds one messuage and 2 virgates 
of land by the service of paying per annum one rose garland at 
Midsummer. John Petevyn holds one messuage and 7 acres of 
land by the service of paying per annum is. 6d. at the feast of 
St. Michael, and he owes suit as above. William Faber holds one 
messuage and 7 acres of land by the service of paying per annum 
5J. at the said term, and he owes suit as above. Adam Molend' 
holds one messuage and 10 acres of land by the service of paying 
per annum 55. bd. at the said term, and he owes suit as above. 
Walter Balk holds 16 acres of land by the service of paying per 
annum one fox's tail. John le Lange holds one messuage and one 
virgate of land by the service of paying per annum iid. at the said 
term. Henry le Frye holds 2 virgates of land by the service of 
paying per annum 5^. at the said term. Walter de la Gore holds 
2 virgates of land by the service of paying per annum ioj. at the 
said term, and he owes suit as above. Roger Arundel holds 7 acres 
of land by the service of paying per annum 7^. at the said term, 
and he owes suit as above. Robert the Clerk holds one messuage 
and \\ acres of land by the service of paying by the year \s. bd. at 
the said term. Nicholas Selyman holds one virgate of land by the 
service of doing suit as above. William Selymon holds half a 
virgate of land by the service of doing suit as above. Henry 
Corphinel{}) holds one messuage and 9 acres of land by the service 
of paying per annum gj. at the said term, and he owes suit as 
above. John Basset holds one messuage and 7 acres of land by the 
service of paying per annum 8j. at the said term. Sum, £"] 19J. <)d. 

CUSTOMARS. 

There are there 7 customars, and each of them pays per annum 
5^. at the feasts of St. Michael, St. Thomas, the Annunciation of 
the Blessed Mary, and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, equally : 



Inquisi Hones Post Mortem. 235; 

siun 3 5 J. And one of the said 7 pays %d. more for a certain over- 
land at the said terms. Each of them shall plough and harrow 
I acre of land at the Winter sowing in the name of chersete, and 
the ploughing of each with the harrowing is worth 6</. And each 
of them shall mow the meadow for 2 days, and the work of each 
is worth \d. beyond reprises. And each of them ought to reap^ 
for 2 days in Autumn, and the work of each is worth \d. Sum of 
the works, ts. ^d. 

There are there 1 1 holders of half-virgates, each of whom shall 
give for chersete one cock and 3 hens at the feast of St. Martin, 
and they are worth ^d. : sum 3^. 8d. And each of them shall work 
from the feast of St. Michael up to the gule of August every other 
day, except festival days and Sundays and the weeks of the Nativity 
of the Lord, Pentecost, and Easter, and the work of each is worth 
by the day id. : sum igs. ii^d. And from the gule of August up 
to the feast of St. Michael each day, and the work of each is worth 
by the day ^d. : sum 1 6.r. 6d. Three of the said 1 1 hold a certain 
overland, and one of them pays therefor by the year 2s. 6d., one 
pays i2d., and one pays gd., at the said 3 terms equally : sum 4^-. 3*/. 

Cottars. 

There are there 16 cottars, 5 of whom shall each work every 
Monday from the feast of St. Michael up to the gule of August, 
and the work of each is worth by the day id. : sum 4^. sd. Ten 
of the said 16 cottars pay 2s. each per annum at the said 4 terms : 
sum 2o.y. There is there one cottar, and he pays per annum iSd. 
at the said terms equally. There are there 6 cottars, each of whom 
pays per annum 3^. at the said 4 terms equally: sum iSs. One 
cottar pays per annum 2s. bd. at the said terms equally. One 
cottar pays per annum 2s. at the said terms. Three cottars each 
pay per annum 2od. at the said terms equally : sum 5^. One cottar 
pays per annum i2d. at the said terms. The pleas and perquisites 
are worth per annum 2s. Sum, £1 2s. loid. 

Sum of the whole manor, ;^i5 2s. "j^d. 

Aystone. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth per annum 2J. 
There is there one carucate of land containing no acres, and it 
is worth per annum i Ss. ^d., price of the acre 2d. There are there 
16 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum 24^., price of 
the acre iSd. There is there a several pasture, and it is worth 
per annum 2s. Also a water-mill, and it is worth per annum 6s. 
There is there the rent of assize of free tenants, to wit, Godfrey 



236 Wiltshire 

Giffard, now Bishop of Worcester, holds 2 virgates of land by the 
service of paying per annum 6j. at the feast of St. Michael and 
the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary equally, and he owes suit 
at the Court of Scherenton. Roger le Baker holds one virgate of 
land by the service of paying per annum 6j. at the said terms, 
and he owes suit from 3 weeks, etc. Sum, 64J. 4^/. 

CUSTOMARS. 

There are there 8 virgators, each of whom pays per annum 6^. 
at the said terms equally : sum 48^. Also one virgator, and he pays 
per annum 8^. at the said terms equally. And each of them shall 
harrow for two days, and the harrowing of each is worth zd. And 
each of them shall wash and shear the lord's sheep, and the work 
of each is worth \d. And each of them shall weed for half a day, 
and the work of each is worth \d. And each of them shall give 
for his works in Autumn i %d. Sum, 1 5 j. t\d. 

There are there 4 holders of half-virgates, each of whom shall 
work from the feast of St. Michael up to the gule of August every 
other day, except the weeks of the Nativity of the Lord, Easter, 
and Pentecost, and festival days, and the work of each is worth 
by the day \d. ; and from the gule of August up to the feast of 
St. Michael each of them shall work each day, and the work 
of each is worth \d. : sum \os. Sd. And each of them shall give 
for chersete one cock and 3 hens, and they are worth 4^. : sum 
1 6d. There is there one cottar, and he pays per annum 2s. at the 
said terms. 

All the above, as well the virgators as half-virgators, shall mow 
the meadow, and the work is worth in the whole 4J. Sd. All the 
aforesaid shall give at the feast of St. Michael to the larder los. 
The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum izd. Sum, 

;^6 I IS. 2\d. 

Sum of the whole manor, £() 1 5J. t^d. 

ESTONE. 

The said John Giffard died seised of the manor of Estone in the 
said county by the name of the wardship of Joan, daughter of 
Peter de Estone, father of the said Peter, and not in his demesne as 
of fee ; the said manor is held of the heirs of Matilda de Lengespey, 
and not of the King in chief. The capital messuage with the 
garden is worth per annum zs. There are there 2 carucates of 
land containing 190 acres of land, and they are worth 31^. %d., 
price of the acre id. Also 6 acres of meadow, and they are worth 
per annum gj., price of the acre i8</. There is there a certain 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. lyj 

wood, the profit whereof is worth zs. Also the rent of assize of 
the free tenants, to wit, John de Cromhale holds one messuage and 
half a carucate of land by the service of paying per annum one 
pair of gilt spurs, price id. William Edward holds half a virgate 
of land and half an acre of meadow by the service of paying per 
annum 4^. ^d., to wit, at the feast of St. Michael zs., at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary i%d., and at the feast of 
St. Thomas the Apostle 9^., and he owes suit from 3 weeks, etc. 
Roger Bolebury holds one messuage and half a virgate of land by 
the service of paying per annum 6j., and he owes suit as above. 
Adam de Cosham holds one messuage and 16 acres of land by the 
service of paying per annum iid. at the feast of St. Thomas the 
Apostle. Sum, 56^. zd. 

There are there 5 half-virgators, each of whom pays per annum 
6d. at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle : sum zs. bd. And each 
of them owes for chersete at the feast of St. Martin one cock and 
3 hens, and they are worth ^d. : sum zod. And each of them 
shall work from the feast of St. Michael up to the gule of August 
every other day except the weeks of Christmas. Easter, and 
Pentecost, and feast days, and the work of each is worth by the 
day \d. ; and from the gule of August up to the feast of St. Michael 
every other day except feast days, and the work is worth \d. 
Sum, iqs. ^\d. 

There is there one customar who holds one water-mill and 2 acres 
of land by the service of paying per annum ^s. at the feast of 
St. Michael and the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary equally. 
Also one cottar, and he pays per annum 4^. at the said terms 
equally. And one cottar, who pays per annum zs. at the said 
terms equally. The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum i zd. 

There is there a certain chapel, the gift whereof belongs to 
the said manor, and it is worth per annum 30J. 

Sum, 345-. bid. 

Sum of the whole manor, £^ los. ^\d. 

Sum of the value of the said manors contained within and without 
.... ;^S5 zs. 4</. 

John Giffard is the son and next heir of the said John Giffard, 
and was aged 12 years on the feast of St. John the Baptist 
last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., J7 Edward I, No. 35^. 



238 Wiltshire 



i^atgaret:, tcife of Slol^n ©ifiarDf* 

I nCJUlSltlOn taken at Scherentone before the King's 
X escheator, 5th August, 27 Edward I [1299], by Ralph 
Daungers, Nicholas le Hardener, Richard de Langeford, John de 
Bacham, William Bytlynnebury, Waller le Scout, John Elys, Peter de 
Wodeford, Robert le Bar, Adam Welyband, Richard Petevyn, and 
Philip le Cok, to enquire if Margaret, who was the wife of John 
Giffard, of Brumeffeld, who held of the King in chief together with 
the said John, formerly her husband, was jointly enfeoffed of 
certain lands and tenements in Orcheston St. George, and if she 
continued her seisin thereof up to the death of the said John or 
not, etc., etc., who say that 

The said Margaret was jointly enfeoffed together with the said 
John of one messuage and one carucate of land in Orchestone 
St. George, and that she continued her seisin thereof until the 
death of the said John, and that 3 years past before the death of 
the said John she was enfeoffed of the said premises by John le Bret, 
who enfeoffed thereof the said John and Margaret and their heirs 
for ever. 

The said land and tenement are held of the King in chief by 
the barony of making to the King for the said manor, together 
with other manors in other counties, the service of 3 knights' fees 
in his Army, and are worth per annum, clear, 64J. \od. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 Edward I, No. ssd. 



(5ttbttt Cl^rtTne antj otf^m for tl^t ptiotm, 
ttc.y of ^xabn^bmv* 

I nqUlSltlOn made at New Sarum on Monday next before 
X the feast of the Apostles Simon and Jude, 27 Edward I 
[1299], by the oath of Thomas de Beauvieer, Richard de la Chambre, 
John de Neyvill, John Michel, Henry le Tempter, John Louuer, Henry 
de Mundeyne, Robert le Cumyner, Peter de Andeuere, Hugh le Nhug, 
John Bishop, Elias le Wympler, Stephen Regat, and John de Brytjord, 
who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King if he should 
'^rant to the Prioress and nuns of Ambresbyr" that they may hold 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 239 

to them and their successors according to the form of the enfeoff- 
ments for ever one messuage in New Sarum, which they acquired 
to themselves in the said city by the enfeoffment of Gilbert Chynne, 
and one messuage in the same city which they acquired by the 
feoflfment of Peter, formerly Bishop of Exeter, except in this only, 
that in the time of a vacancy the King has the custody of the said 
city because the Bishop holds the said city of the King in chief; 
and if there shall happen an escheat of the said messuages in 
the time of the vacancy, which rarely or never happens, because 
the tenants of the said messuages hold the same to them and their 
heirs, and may, according to the custom of the said liberty, alienate 
those messuages to whomsoever they shall wish, saving neverthe- 
less to the said Prioress and nuns certain rents coming therefrom 
yearly, and to the Bishop, the chief lord of the said city, the rents 
and all other services due therefor; neither from henceforth can 
it be to the prejudice of the Bishop of Sarum, the chief lord, as 
the said Prioress and nuns have peacefully held the said messuage 
which they acquired from Gilbert Chynne for the last 1 6 years and 
more, and the messuage which they have of the feoffment of Peter, 
Bishop of Exeter, for the last 25 years and more ; nor to the 
damage of the city, because the said tenants are geldable with the 
other citizens in all manner of tallages and aids to the King, 
the Bishop, or the commonalty of the said city in what way soever 
emerging. The said Gilbert Chynne and Peter the Bishop had no 
other lands as they recollect which may happen to their heirs. 
The said tenements are held of the Bishop of Sarum for 6j. %d., 
and in 2 suits at 2 law days by the year. The said messuage that 
was of Gilbert Chynne is bound in zos. of silver of yearly pension 
to the church of Mellebyr', and is worth per annum, clear, 40J. 
The messuage that was of Peter, formerly Bishop of Exeter, is 
worth per annum, clear, one mark of silver. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 Edward I, No. 128. 



Cl^e ^riore00 of ambrejsburr* 

Writ dated at Westminster, 2nd August, 27 Edward I [1299]. 

Tine King to the sheriff of Wilts, commanding him to 
enquire whether it be to the damage of the King or others 
if he (the King) should grant to the Prioress and nuns of 
Ambresbury that they may hold to themselves and their successors, 



240 Wiltshire 

according to the form of the feoffments for ever, one messuage 
and one virgate of land in Dur)mgton, which they acquired by the 
feoffment of Robert Goiun, and one messuage and the moiety of 
one virgate of land in Induryngton by the feoffment of Emesius 
de Durynton, after the statute published concerning lands and 
tenements not put to mortmain, or not, etc., etc. 



TT • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made before the sheriff of Wilts at Ambum(?), 

A on Monday next after the feast of St. Michael, 27 Edward I 
[1299], by the oath o^ John Mychel, Henry le Templer, Robert le 
Frankeleyn, William Beyschyn, John Lower, Richard de Middleston, 

William Sylle, Henry Trussehare, Robert Mychel, Richard Bertholomeu, 
Henry le Vreys, and /ohn de Bottokesham, who say that 

One messuage and one virgate of land in Duryngton, which the 
said Prioress has of the gift of Robert Goion, is held in chief of 
John de Nevylle by the service of 5^., and moreover is worth per 
annum ioj. It is not to the damage of the country, because the 
residue demised to the heirs of the said Robert Goion suffices to do 
the customs and services which the said Robert was wont to do. 
One messuage and the moiety of one virgate of land in Hyndur- 
yngton, which the said Prioress and nuns have of the feoffment of 
Emesius de Duryngton, are of the fee of the said Prioress, and held 
of the same by the service of 5^. by the year, and moreover it is 
worth yearly 5^. The heir of the said Ernesius has sufficient to do 
the customs and services, so that there is no damage of any other. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 Edward I, No. 128. 



IriQUlSltlOn made at Lutegereshale on Sunday next after 
the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, 27 Edward I [1299], 
whether the wardship and presentation of the house of St. Mark 
of Bylleswyke next Bristol belong to the King by reason of the 
manor of Wynterburne Gonnore, which Brother Robert de Radynges, 
late Master of the said house, and the brethren of the said house, 
held of the King in chief, or to fohi Abbadam and Elizabeth his 
wife, and whether the brethren of the said house, when vacancies 
occurred among them, were wont to seek licence to choose from 
the King or his progenitors, or from the said John and Elizabeth, 
and the ancestors of the said Elizabeth, and to present the elect 



Inquisitiones Post Mortein. 241 

when chosen, and by what service the said manor is held of the 
King, by the oath of Thomas Bucher, Peter de Fortesbury, Peter 
Olyver, Richard Gerveys, William de Hugthe, Robert de Hareffeld 
William Warde, John Kuttewyne, Adam le Frangeleyn, John Michel,- 
William de Boscombe, and William Sylle, who say that 

The wardship of the said house in the time of a vacancy does 
not belong to the King by reason of the manor of Wynterbume 
Gonnore, which the said hroiher Robert de Radynes and the brethren 
of the said house hold of the King, but to the ^^xd. John Abbadam 
and Elizabeth his wife, because the said house is of the inheritance 
of the said Elizabeth. 

The brethren of the said house in the time of a vacancy ought 
to seek licence to elect from the said John and Elizabeth, and to 
present their clerk to them when they have chosen him, by reason 
that the said brethren and their predecessors from the time of the 
foundation of the said house were wont to seek such licence from 
the ancestors of the said Elizabeth, and to present their chosen 
clerk to them. 

The said Master and brethren of the said house hold one carucate 
of land in the said manor of Wynterbourne Gonnore of the King 
by small serjeanty, by the service of paying per annum 12^. at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, by the hands of the sheriff of 
Wiltshire, to the use of the King. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 27 Edward I, No. 132. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Calne on Wednesday next after the 
A Purification of the Blessed Mary. 27 Edward I [1299]. con- 
cerning the lands and tenements of the which Humphrey de Bonn 
±.arl of Herejord and Essex, was seised in his demesne as of fee 
m CO. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath of Walter Ruston (^) 
Henry Vygerous, John de Hakyngton, Adam Wyberd, Richard de la 
iHr), a ^' Mareschal, Richard Baylmound, William Baylmond 
William Scolas, William de Tedyngdon, Reginald Reyli, and Gilbert 
rraunceys, who say that 

The said Earl was seised in his demesne as of fee of the manor 
ot Wockesygh m the said county. 

The capital messuage with the garden and curtilage are worth 
per annum izs. There is there a dovecote, and it is worth per 
annum 2.. There are there in the demesne 4 carucates of land 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. II. , 

- „ 10 



242 



Wiltshire 



containing 300 [acres] by the lesser number, and each acre is worth 
per annum 4//. : sum loos. Also 80 acres of meadow, and each acre 
is worth per annum i id. because they are poor : sum £^. There 
is there in the demesne a cejtain several pasture, and it is worth 
per annum 465. id. Also the rent of assize of the free tenants 
per annum, viz. of Thomas U Engleys, who holds half a virgate 
of land by the service of paying per annum at Easter zs. Geoffrey 
Davy holds one virgate of land by the service of paying per annum 
5J. at the feasts of St. Michael, St. Andrew the Apostle, the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, and the Nativity of St. John 
the Baptist, equally. Robert Capell holds one virgate of land and 
one water-mill by the service of paying per annum 14^. %d. at 
the said 4 terms equally. Richard Bissop holds one virgate of land 
by the service of paying per annum ts. at the said terms equally. 
Walter de Buthom holds one virgate of land by the service of paying 
per annum loj. at the said terms equally. Gregory Est holds half 
a virgate of land by the service of paying per annum 3 j. at the said 
4 terms equally. Mager de Frome holds 5 acres of land by the 
service of paying per annum 3^. at the said terms equally. Thomas 
the Clerk holds 5 acres of land by the service of paying per annum 
idd. at the feasts of St, Michael and the Annunciation of the 
Blessed Mary equally. Robert le Porter holds one croft by the 
service of paying per annum zod. at the said 4 terms equally. 
Cristina Flynt holds one croft of land by the service of paying 
per annum 5^. at the said 4 terms equally. Juliana de Lond' holds 
one croft of land by the service of paying per annum \zd. at the 
said 2 terms equally. Alice Donee holds one croft by the service of 
paying per annum rod. at the said 4 terms equally. Alice Batekoc 
holds one messuage by the service of paying per annum 2J. at the 
said 2 terms equally. 

CUSTOMARS. 

There are there i o virg^tors, and each of them shall work every 
day throughout the whole year, except Sundays and feast days and 
the weeks of Christmas, Easter, and Pentecost, or shall give for 
each day a halfpenny between the feasts of St. Michael and the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and the works of the said 
10 customars for the said term are worth 45.r. \od. The works 
of the same between the feast of the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist and the gule of August are worth per annum 275. bd., and 
between the gule of August and the feast of St. Michael 51J. \d. 
Each of the aforesaid pays per annum besides the said works ^d. at 
the said 4 terms: sum 4J. id. There are there 18 half-virgators, 
each of whom shall work each day throughout the year, except as 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 243 

above, and their works are worth between the feasts of St. Michael 
and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 78J. 9^. ; and between the 
feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist and the gule of August 
24J., and between the gule of August and the feast of St. Michael 
48J. 9^. : sum £'j iis. bd. Each of. them pays per annum besides 
the said works id. at the said 4 terms : sum y. <)d. 

There are there 13 cottars, each of whom pays per annum iid. 
at the said 4 terms equally : sum 1 3^. Also 6 cottars, each of whom 
pays per annum 8</. at the said 4 terms equally : sum 4J. There is 
there one cottar, and he pays per annum lod. at the said 4 terms 
equally, and one who pays per annum bd. at the said terms, and 
one who pays by the year id. at Easter. All the said customars 
give per annum of aid at Michaelmas 40J. There is there a certain 
wood, 6 acres whereof may be sold per annum, and each acre 
is worth Md. : sum 6s. Also a windmill, and it is worth per annum 
13s. 4</. The pannage of pigs is worth per annum zs. The pleas 
and perquisites are worth per annum 6s. 8d., because they are only 
iield twice a year, to wit, at the feast of St. Martin and Hockday. 

Sum of the value of the said manor, ;^33 7^. 3^. 

Humphrey de Bonn is the son and next heir of the said Earl, and 
is aged 23 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 27 Edward I, No. 142. 



mtlUam -ffitf^raarin^ 



T • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
A William son of Warin in cos. Wilts and Southampton, made 
at Crofton by the King's escheator, on Wednesday next after the 
feast of St. Vincent, 28 Edward I [1300], hy Eustace Savage, John 
Fraunkelayn, John de Wulphale, John Channyn, Robert Braybeof, 
Geoffrey Commangere, William Galewe, John Burgoyllon, John le Eyr, 
Thomas de Meere{}), Robert LouJ, Henry Nyman, Reginald Totere, 
William de Ryngwude, and William ate Elme, who say that 

The said William son of Warin held nothing of the King in 
chief on the day that he died, but he held the lands and tenements 
underwritten of William Kaynel by the service of \d. in the vill of 
Crofton, of which said lands and tenements the capital messuage 
with a small close is worth per annum 6d. There are there 
1 80 acres of arable land, price of the acre per annum zd. Also 
2. acres of meadow, and the acre is worth per annum zs. There 
is there a certain pasture in common, and it is worth per annum 



244 Wiltshire 

zs. There are there 12 free tenants, each of whom holds one 
virgate of land, and they pay per annum 47T. ^^d. at the feasts of 
St. Michael and Easter by equal portions. Also 4 cottars, and 
they pay per annum Si. at the said 2 terms equally. 

Alan is the son and next heir of the said William, and is aged 

28 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 1 1. 



. I nOUlSltlOn made before the escheator at Wodebergh,. 
X nth June, 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Dionisia de Essex in co. Wilts on the day that she 
died, by the oath of William Durdant, John Edmund, Roger le Wyse, 
Adam le Coupere, John Kyng, William Hoghe, Hugh de Wyvelesjord, 
William le Val, Henry Algame, John Midewynter, John le Erode, and' 
William de Molend\ who say that 

The said Dionisia held a certain tenement in the vill of Wode- 
bergh of the King in chief by the service of the fourth part of one 
knight's fee. 

The capital messuage is worth per annum iid. There are there 
5 (?) acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 25^., price of 
the acre bd. Also 4 acres of meadow which are worth per annum 
8j., price of the acre 2J. There is there a certain common pasture 
which is worth per annum 3^. ^d. Sum, 37J. /^d. 

There are there 2 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate 
of land and pays per annum 4^., to wit, at Michaelmas, Christmas, 
Easter, and Midsummer. There is there a third customar, who 
holds half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 3^. zi^d. at the 
said terms. Also a fourth customar, who holds the eighth part of 
one mill and the eighth part of one virgate of land, and pays per 
annum g^c/. at the said terms. The said customars ought to do 
works in the Autumn which are worth per annum i3i</. Sum of 
the whole value, 50J. s^t/. 

William, son of the said Dionisia, is her next heir, and is aged 
16 years. 

The said Dionisia, who in this inquisition is called Dionisia de 
Essex, is called in the writ annexed to this inquisition [^no7V loni] 
Dionisia de Helvynton, and in my account to the King's Exchequer 
I answer for the lands of Dionisia de Essex, but it was the same 
Dionisia, and not a different one. 



I nquisitiones Post Mortem. 245 



^P • • • 

I nC^lllSltlOn made at Rowedone before the escheator, 
X 23rd May, 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Nicholas de la Hoose on the day that he died, by the 
oath of Roger Bubbe, Richard de Comerwell, John Keynel, John 
Fyzurs, Robert de Bardeneye, Robert de Hatte^ Thomas RoyUy Adam 
Bruton, John de Aula, William de Buduston, John Bubbe, and Roger 
de Chyverdene, who say that 

The said Nicholas de la Hoose held the manor of Rowedone, in 
CO. Wilts, of the King in chief by fee farm, paying at the King's 
Exchequer per annum £1 \os. at Michaelmas. 

The capital messuage of Rowedone, with the easement of the 
houses and 2 small gardens adjoining, are worth per annum 3J. 
There is there one dovecote, which is worth per annum zs. There 
are there 272 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 
78J., price of the acre 3</. Also 24 acres of meadow, which are 
worth per annum 485'., price of the acre zs. There is there a 
common pasture, which is worth per annum zs. There are there 
5 free tenants of whom Adam Hardyng holds one messuage and 
one virgate of land, and pays per annum %s. at Michaelmas, 
Christmas, Lady Day, and Midsummer, and owes suit ; Roger de 
Bokerwyk holds one messuage and one virgate of land, and pays 
per annum \zs. at the said terms, and owes suit; Roger Atte Haywe 
holds one messuage and one virgate of land, ^d pays per annum 
\zs. at the said terms, and owes suit; Walter Atte Yatte holds one 
messuage and one virgate of land, and pays per annum bs. at the 
said terms, and owes suit ; Nicholas Atte Barre holds one messuage 
and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 5^. \d. at the said 
terms, and owes suit. Sum of the rents of the free tenants, 43J. 4^/. 
There are there 10 customars, one of whom holds half a virgate of 
land, and pays per annum \os. td. at the said 4 terms ; one holds 
5 acres of land, and pays per annum zs. bd. at the said terms, and 
3 hens and i cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of the cock 
and hejis id. ; one holds 2 acres of land, and pays per annum 35-. 
at the said terms, and 3 hens and one cock, price as above, at the 
feast of St. Martin ; and 4 of them are of one tenure, each of whom 
holds 5 acres of land, and pays per annum zs. at the said 4 feasts, 
and 3 hens and one cock, price as above, at the feast of St. Martin ; 
and 3 of them are of another tenure, and each of them holds half 
1 7 * 



246 



Wiltshire 



a virgate of land, and pays per annum loi-. td. at the said terms- 
Six of the said customars eight to mow the lord's meadow, and 
that mowing is worth per annum is. Sum of the rent of the 
customars, 55^. td. Sum of .the works, ^s. Sum of the hens, 24. 
Sum of the value of the hens, zs. There are there 38 cottars, 
of whom one holds one cottage, and pays per annum zs. ^d. at the 
said 4 feasts ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 3J. at 
the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 2^. ^d. 
at the said terms; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum lod. 
at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum izd. 
at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
i6d. at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
2s. 6d. at the said terms; one holds one cottage, and pays per 
annum zs. at the said terms ; one holds one cottage with a curtilage, 



one holds one cottage^ 
one holds one cottage, 
one holds one cottage, 
one holds one cottage, 
one holds one cottage, 
one holds one cottage 



and pays per annum 5^. at the said terms 
and pays per annum 4^. at the said terms 
and pays per annum ^s. at the said terms 
and pays per annum 4^. at the said terms 
and pays per annum ^s. at the said terms 
and pays per annum 4J. at the said terms 
with a curtilage, and pays per annum 5^. at the said terms ; one 
holds one cottage with a curtilage, and pays per annum 6s. at the 
said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 3^. at 
the said terms; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum iSd. 
at the feasts of St. Michael and the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 1 8^'. at the said 
terms; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 12a'. at the 
said terms; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum izd. at 
the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum i^d. 
at the said terms; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum isd. 
at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum bd. 
at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
2s. 8^d. at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays per 
annum 6d. at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays 
per annum 1 ^d. at the said terms ; one holds one cottage, and pays 
per annum izd. at the said terms; one holds one cottage, and 
pays per annum i6d. at the said terms; one holds one cottage, 
and pays per annum 6d. at the said terms. There are there 
8 cottars of one tenure, each of whom holds one cottage and 
pays per annum zs. at Michaelmas and Lady Day : sum of the 
rents of the cottars ;^4 4^. o^d. There are there 2 water-mills 
which are worth per annum 40J., and one water-mill which is 
worth per annum los., and one fulling-mill worth per annum los^ 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. i^.y 

The perquisites of the Court with the third part of the foreign 
hundred of Chippeham are worth per annum one mark. 

Sum of the whole value of Rowedon, ^19 i^s. z\d., whereof 
there ought to be repaid at the King's Exchequer ^7 los., and so 
the manor is worth per annum, clear, £ii ^s. i\d. 

Peter de la Heose, nephew [riepos^ of the said Nicholas, is his next 
heir, and is aged 40 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 29. 



IriQUlSltlOn made at Combe before the escheator, 6th May, 
28 Edward I [1300"], of the lands and tenements -which John 
de Wotion held on the day that he died of the King in chief by the 
law of England of the inheritance of Ela Byset, formerly his wife, 
by the oath of Robert Gilberd, Thomas le Ryde, Henry le Frye, John 
Marlyn, Richard le Feng, John le Cok, John Stubard, John de la More, 
Philip Buterstyp, William le Hunte, Nicholas Bernard, John Sturmy, 
Thomas Baudewyne, John Heryng, Robert le Turnur, Peter Ingram, 
William le Pope, and Edward Cobbe, who say that 

The said John de Wotton held by the law of England of the 
inheritance of the said Ela, formerly his wife, of the King in chief 
the moiety of the vill of Combe, in co. Wilts, and the vill of 
Rokeborn, in co. Southampton, by the service of the fourth part of 
a knight's fee. 

There is at Combe a capital messuage with a small garden, which 
are worth per annum bd. There is there the moiety of one mill, 
and it is worth per annum half a mark. There are there 50 acres 
of arable land, and they are worth per annum 8^-. ^d., price of the 
acre id. ; also 6 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 9^., 
price of the acre i2>d. The perquisites of the Court are worth 
per annum izd. There are there 4 free tenants, one of whom 
holds one carucate of land, and pays per annum iid. at the feast of 
St. Michael ; another holds 2 virgates of land, and pays per annum 
half a mark at Michaelmas, Christmas, Lady Day, and Midsummer; 
one holds [one messuage with a curtilage, and pays per annum 25. 
at the said 4 terms; and one holds 14 acres of land, and pays 
per annum 4J. at the said terms. Sum of the rent of the free 
tenants, 13^. %d. 

There are there 13 customars, each of whom holds one virgate 
of land, and pays per annum ts. ^d. at the feasts of Michaelmas, 



248 Wiltshire 

Christmas, Lady Day, and Midsummer. And the said customars 
ought to reap in the Autumn for g days, or each of them shall give 
to the lord \%d. Sum of the rent of the customars, £^ is. -^d. Sum 
of the works, i qs. 6d. 

There are there 6 cottars, each of whom pays per annum 2s. Sd. 
at the said feasts. Sum of the rent of the cottars, 16s. 

Sum of the sums of the whole value, £"] 15X. $d. 

[Then follows extent of Rokebome, co. Southampton, which 
amounts to ;^i6 13^. id.'] 

Sum-total of Combe and Rokebome, £2^\. Ss. 6d. 

John Byset, son of the said John and Ela, is their next heir, and 
is aged 40 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 30. 



Cl^omaiEi J^eterel, of ^amforD, 

I nOlllSltlOn made at Domerham before the escheator, 

X. 3rd August, 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Thomas Peverel, of Samford [co. Devon], on the day 
that he died, by the oath of Robert Peytevyn, Reginald de Tudeputte^ 
Robert de la Sale, William le Knyth, Geoffrey Cof, Robert de la Hyde, 
Patrick Lambard, Robert Faber, John de Canlibrigg, Richard Costard, 
Richard de la Forthehegh, and John Wydejord, who say that 

Thomas Peverel held the moiety of the hundred of Stapele, in 
CO. Wilts, with the rent and wood to the said hundred belonging, 
of the King in chief, by the service of finding one esquire with one 
horse covered \_^cooperto'] in the King's army for 40 days at his 
own costs, for the said lands, and likewise for Samford Peverel and 
Aire, in co. Devon. 

He also held a certain tenement and one carucate of land in the 
vill of Domerham, in co. Wilts, of Reginald de Sancto Martino in 
chief, by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. 

The moiety of the said hundred of Stapele is worth per annum 
\os. The profit of the said wood as in pannage, attachments, and 
other perquisites is worth per annum \os. 

He had also £b %s. zd. of yearly rent in Magna Chylewerth, 
belonging to the said hundred, to be taken by the lands oi Matilda 
Peverel at the feasts of St, Michael, the Nativity of the Lord, Easter, 
and St. John the Baptist. Sum, £1 %s. id. 

The capital messuage of Domerham with the easements of the 
houses, with two small gardens adjoining, are worth per annum is. 



Inquisittones Post Mortem, 249 

There are there 57 acres of arable land, which are worth per 
annum 9^. dd., price of the acre zd. There is there one acre of 
meadow, which is worth per annum zs. There are there 4 acres 
of several pasture, which are worth per annum \bd., price of the 
acre \d. There is there the moiety of one mill, which is worth 
per annum ds. Sum, z\s. \od. There is there one free tenant 
who holds half an acre of land, and pays per annum 2 lbs. of wax, 
price of the lb. td., at the feast of St. Michael. There are there 
8 customars, of which 5 are of one tenure, and each of whom holds 
8 acres of land, and pays per annum zs. at the feasts of Michaelmas, 
Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer, and each of them pays at the 
feast of St. Martin 3 hens and one cock, price of the hens \d. 
And 3 of the said 8 customars are of another tenure, each of whom 
holds 4 acres of land, and pays \zd. at the said terms, and 3 hens 
and one cock, price of the hens \d., at the feast of St. Martin. 
There are there 2 cottars, one of whom holds "^ne cottage, and 
pays per annum 35. at the said terms, and the other holds another 
cottage, and pays per annum \zd. at the said terms. And 6 of the 
said customars ought to reap throughout the whole Autumn each 
day half an acre, except Sunday, and the work of each customar 
is worth y. for the whole Autumn. Sum of the rent, i8j. Sum of 
the works, \%s. Sum of the hens, 32. Sum of the money, zs. %d. 

Sum of the value of the moiety of the hundred of Stape!e, 
£1 8j. zd. 

Sum of the value of the lands and tenements of Domerham, 
60J. 6</. 

Margery^ aged 25 years, Joan, aged 24 years, and Di'onisia, 
aged 2 1 years, sisters of the said Thomas Peverel, are his next heirs. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 39. 



IBdiXinw iHauDutt 

TT • • • 

I riQUlSltlOn made at Wermeinstre before the escheator, 
A 17th November, 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and 

tenements which were of Warin Mauduit on the day that he 

died, by the oath of Robert Goscelyn, John le Botelyr, Robert Mauger, 
William de Molend\ Symon Northman, William Wyneband, Robert 

. . . geant, Symon H . . . edal, Roger atte Well, John le Free, 

Roger Wyneband, and Roger de Upton, who say that 

Warin Mauduyt held the manor of Wermeinstre and 2 carucates 

of land at Westbury, in co. Wilts, of the King in chief by the service 

of one knight's fee. 



250 Wiltshire 



Warminster. 

The capital messuage of Wermeinstre, with the easements of the 
houses and 2 gardens adjacent, is worth per annum one mark. 
There are there 240 acres of arable land, which are worth per 
annum £6, price of each acre bd. Also 30 acres of meadow, 
which are worth per annum bos., price of each acre zs. There is 
there a common pasture, which is worth per annum 25^. Also 
a certain rabbit warren, which is worth per annum is. ; sum 
£11 OS. ^d. There is there a water-mill, which is worth per 
annum 26^. %d. There are there 35 free tenants, of whom Nicholas 
de la Mare holds 2 carucates of land, and pays per annum 3^., 
to wit, at the feasts of St. Michael, the Nativity of the Lord, 
Easter, and St. John the Baptist, by equal portions. Robert 
Maudut holds one carucate of land, and pays per annum \d. at 
Easter, Joan de Anne holds one carucate of land, and pays at the 
feast of St. Michael 5^. \o\d., at the Nativity of the Lord \zs. 9^., 
at Easter is. \o\d., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist ^s. \o\d. 
Robert Goscelyn holds one carucate of land, and pays per annum 
30J. 8«/., viz., at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer, 
by equal portions. John de Sonnynyges holds 2 virgates of land, 
and pays at Michaelmas 2^-. bd., at Christmas 5^., at Easter zs. bd., 
and at Midsummer zs. bd. Symon Northman holds one virgate 
of land, and pays at Michaelmas 15^^., at Christmas zs. 9^/., at 
Easter i^d., and at Midsummer 15^. Cecilia la Vynetere holds 
one carucate of land, and pays at Michaelmas 4^. 7J<f., at 
Christmas ^s. ^d., at Easter 4J. ']\d., and at Midsummer 4J. i\d. 
Matilda la Botelere holds half a virgate of land, and pays at 
Michaelmas 9^., at Christmas zs. 3^., at Easter ^d., and at Mid- 
summer f^d. John Bernard holds 8 acres of land, and pays per 
annum 4^. %d. at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer, 
by equal portions. Walter de Cheyny holds one carucate of 
land, and pays per annum 10s. at the said terms. John le 
Botelyr holds one messuage with a curtilage, and pays per 
annum \zd. at the said terms. Roger de Hanckston holds 
6 acres of land, and pays per annum \%d. at the said terms. 
Robert atte .... holds one mill, and pays per annum 18^. 
at the said terms. William de Molend' holds one virgate of land, 
and pays per annum 5^. bd. at the said terms. William de Berwyk 
holds one virgate of land, and pays per annum 7^. bd. at the 
said terms. Alice de . . . . holds a certain pasture, and pays 
per annum zs. at the said terms. Gilbert Franceys holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays per annum %d. at the said terms. 



Inquisiti07ies Post Mortem. 251 

Emma de Radenhurste holds one messuage, and pays per annum 
IS. at the said terms. Adam de Werin holds half a virgate of land, 
and pays per annum xs. \d. at the said terms. Richard le Tannere 
holds one messuage, and pays per annum $s. at the said terms. 
William Wyneband holds 2 virgates of land, and pays at the feast of 
St. Michael i8(/., at the Nativity of the Lord 4-r. bd., at Easter i%d., 
and at the feast of St. John the Baptist 18^. Cuistancia, the relict 
of the smith [relicta ffabr.\ holds one virgate of land, and pays 
at Midsummer bd. William le Noreys holds one messuage, and 
pays at Christmas 14^. Walter Cristine holds one acre of land, 
and pays bd. at Michaelmas. Richard de la Holeweye holds a certain 
pasture, and pays at Michaelmas i^d. and at Easter ^^. William 
le Woel holds three acres of land, and pays \^d. at Midsummer. 
Henry de Tydoleside holds 9 acres of land, and pays at Christmas 
12^. and at Easter \id. The Prior of Middeldon holds a certain 
pasture, and pays is. at Michaelmas. William Blundel holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays c)\d. at Midsummer. Henry Lagheffull 
holds a certain pasture, and pays i id. at the feast of St. Michael. 
Walter de Parco holds a certain pasture, and pays \rd. at Christmas. 
Thomas de Farenhull holds one acre of land, and pays bd. at 
Midsummer. Roger Ramesholt holds one messuage, and pays at 
Easter \d. William Pydeman holds one pasture, and pays bd. at 
Michaelmas. Richard Richeman holds half a virgate of land, and 
pays per annum -js. bd. at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and 
Midsummer: sum of the rent of the free tenants £<:) i^s. lo^d. 

There are there 7 customars, each of whom holds one virgate of 
land, and pays at Michaelmas is. b^d., at Christmas 3^. b^d., at 
Easter 14ft/., and at Midsummer i5j</. And each of them shall 
do one work 3 days in the week from the feast of St. Michael 
up to the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula, and the day's work is 
worth ^d. And each of them shall do one work each day, except 
Sundays and feast days, from the said feast of St. Peter ad Vincula 
up to the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, viz., for 2 1 days, and 
the day's work is worth id. There are there 5 customars, each of 
whom holds 4 acres of land, and pays per annum gd. at Christmas, 
and 3 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of the 
hen id. And each of them shall w^ork every day throughout the 
year, except Sundays and feast days, and the day's work is worth ^d. 
Sum of the rent of the customars, 63J. lod. Sum of the works, 
1 14J. ^d. Sum of the hens, 20. Sum of the money, 20^. 

There are there 6 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and 
pays at Michaelmas id., at Christmas Sd., at Easter id., and at 
Midsummer j^d. And 5 of the said cottars pay 3 hens and one 



252 Wiltshire 

cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of the hen id. Sum of the 
Tent of the cottars, 6x. lo^d. Sum of the hens, 20. Sum of the 
money, lod. The pleas and perquisites of the hundred are worth 
per annum £\. The pleas and perquisites of the Court are worth 
per annum (yos. There is there a fair at the feast of St. Laurence, 
which is worth with the toll of the market i^s. by the year. 
Sum of the whole value of Wermeinstre, ^40 los. ii\d. 

Westbury. 

The capital messuage of Westbury, with the easements of the 
houses and the gardens adjoining, is worth per annum 4^. There 
is there a dovecote, which is worth per annum zs. There are there 
160 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum ^4, price 
of each acre dd. Also 15 acres of meadow, which are worth per 
annum 305., price of each acre is. There is there a common 
pasture, which is worth per annum zos. : sum £(> \6s. There are 
there 8 free tenants, of whom Walter de Pavelly holds half a virgate 
of land, and pays per annum at Michaelmas y. $d., at the feast 
of St. Thomas the Apostle 2s., at the feast of the Annunciation 
of the Blessed Mary zs., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist is. 
Robert Plogenet holds one virgate of land, and pays at Michaelmas 
IS. "jd., and at the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary i^d. Symon 
Herkedal holds one virgate of land, and pays at Michaelmas 2^. bd., 
at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle is., at the feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary is. bd., and at the feast of 
St. John the Baptist is. Walter de Brocweye holds half a virgate of 
land, and pays at Michaelmas i8</. Roger Wynehand holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays at the feast of St. Michael bd. Savericus 
de Fifhok holds 5 acres of land, and pays at Michaelmas 3^. and at 
Lady Day 3^. John le Rous holds half an acre of meadow, and pays 
at Michaelmas bd.: sum of the rents of the free tenants 31X. $d. 
There are there 5 customars, of whom Nicholas de Hauekrigg holds 
one virgate of land, and pays at Lady Day is. bd. and at Midsummer 
IS. 7i</., and 3 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price 
of the hen \d. And he shall do one work for 3 days in the week, 
from the feast of St. Michael up to the feast of St. John the Baptist, 
and the day's work is worth \d. And he shall do the work each 
day, except Sundays and feast days, from the said feast of St. John 
the Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael, and the day's work 
is worth \\d. Another holds one virgate of land, and pays at 
Michaelmas is. and 3 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, 
price of the hen \d. And he ought to reap in the Autumn 2 acres, 
and the work is worth bd. Three of the said customars are of one 



I 



Inquisitiones Post Morteiit. 25^ 

tenure, each of whom holds half a virgate of land, and pays 3 hens 
and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of the hen as above. 
And each of them ought to do one work every day throughout the 
year, except Sundays and feast days, and the day's work is worth \d. 
Sum of the rent of the customars, \zs. id. Sum of the works,. 
44J. -j^d. Sum of the hens, 20. Sum of the money, zod. 

There are there 28 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and 
they pay altogether at the feast of St. Michael 17^. sd., at the feast 
of St. Thomas the Apostle 3^. id., at the feast of the Annunciation 
of the Blessed Mary %s. id., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist 
4-y. id. : sum of the rents of the cottars 32J. qd. The pleas and 
perquisites of the Court are worth per annum 6s. Sd. 

Sum of the whole value of Westbury, £1^ 5^. id. 

Sum of the whole value of Wermeinstre, £^0 los. i i^d. 

Thomas, son of Wan'n Matidut, is the next heir of the said Wan'tif 
and is aged 14 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I., No. 41. 



T • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn made before the escheator at ... . 

X 27th June, 29 Edward I [1301], of the knight's fees and 
advowsons of churches which were of John Tregoz on the day that 
he died, by the oath o^ John de Seggree, Simon de Forde, Roger BouUe, 

William Maleivayn, John Felyp, Hugh Druays, William de Dodejorde, 
Edmund Swyji, William Styward, William de Mordone, William 
Baillemound, and Richard de Comerivelle, who say that 

Walter de Eskydemour held of the said John Tregoz in Upton 
Skydemour 2 fees and a half belonging to the Castle of Ewyas, 
and they are worth per annum in the time of wardship 505. Also 
3 fees in Norton and Fyshyde, which are in the wardship of the 
King by reason of the minority of Roger de Bavent, and are worth 
per annum 60^. Reginald Hose held half a knight's fee and the 
fourth part of a knight's fee in the vill of Teffonte Ewyas, and they 
are worth per annum 8.?. Joceus Forestarius held the fourth part of 
one fee in the said vill of TefFonte, and it is worth per annum 
2X. 6</. Stephen le Druays held half a fee in Allecanyng, and it is 
worth per annum los. Also Nicholas Poynz held one fee in Roukley, 
and it is worth per annum ly. ^d. John de Seggree held one fee in 
Somerford Ewyas, and it is worth per annum 1 3^. ^d. Roger Boulle 
held one fee in Tuderyngton Lucas, and it is worth per annum loj. 

William de Dodejoi-d held one fee in Cl}ve Wancy, and it is worth 



254 Wiltshire 

per annum los. William, son of William Wyisond, and Simon Waz 
held half a fee in Haydonewyk, and it is worth per annum 6s. Sd. 
William de Mordone, and Robert de Mordone, and Robert de Wyke held 
one fee in Mordone, and it is worth per annum loj. Philip le Gay 
held one fee in WestwydyhuUe, and it is worth per annum 20j. 
There are no advowsons of churches in co. Wilts. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 43. . 



I n(][UlSltlOn made before the escheator, 25th October, 
X 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and tenements which were 
•of John Tregoz in co. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath 
of Humphrey de Merghden, Hugh le Droeys, Reginald Waz, John 
Felype, Walter Malewayn, Henry de Okebume, Gilbert de Stobynton, 
Walter le Blak, Walter atte Brigg, Hamond Virgile, Walter Syward, 
and John de Erdynton, who say that 

John Tregoz held the manor of Alyngton, in the said county, of 
the King in chief, belonging to the barony of Ewyas, and the 
hamlet of Estkenete of Reginald de Sancto Martino, and the prebend 
of Ichene, in chief by the service of paying to the said Reginald 
20s. at the feast of St. Michael, and to the said prebend of Ichene 
26s. 8d. at the said feast. 

Alington. 

The capital messuage of Alyngton, with the easements of the 
houses, is worth per annum zs. There is there one dovecote, 
which is worth per annum 2s. There are there 340 acres of land, 
which are worth per annum £1^ y. \d., price of the acre \od. 
Also 3 pieces of meadow containing 10 acres, which are worth 
per annum 20J., price of the acre zs. There is there a pasture for 
24 sheep, which is worth per annum izs., price of the capitage td. 
Also pasture for 400 sheep, which is worth per annum 50J., price 
of the capitage \\d. There are there 4 free tenants, of whom 
James de Pendok holds one messuage and 5 acres of land, and pays 
per annum 4^., viz., at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Mid- 
summer, by equal portions. John Peres holds one messuage and 
8 acres of land, and pays per annum ^s. ^d. at the said terms. 
William Pyeres holds one messuage and 1 5 acres of land, and pays 
per annum 6j. 3^. at the said terms. Richard de Stredewy holds 
one messuage with a curtilage, and pays per annum zs. at the said 
terms. Sum of the rents of the free tenants, i6j. There are there 
1 1 customars of one tenure, each of whom holds one virgate of 
land, and pays per annum \od. at the feast of St. Michael. And 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 255 

each of them shall do one work every day throughout the year 
except Sunday, and the day's work is worth \d. There are there 
8 customars of another tenure, each of whom holds 8 acres of 
land, and pays 3 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, 
price of the hen \d. And each of them shall do one manual work 
every day throughout the year except Sundays and feast days, and 
the work of each customar is worth per annum 3^. 6</. Sum of 
the rents of the customars, qs. 2d. Sum of the works, £^ igs. bd. 
Sum of the hens, 32. Sum of the money, 2^. 8t/. There are there 
4 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
%\d. at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer. Sum of 
the rent of the cottars, is. lod. The pleas and perquisites of the 
Court are worth per annum 2^. Sum of the whole value, £2$ is. 6d. 

Est Kenet. 

The capital messuage of the hamlet of Estkenete, with the close 
adjacent, is worth per annum 5^. There are there 80 acres of land, 
which are worth per annum 20^., price of the acre ^d. There is 
there half an acre of meadow, which is worth per annum i8d. Also 
a certain common pasture, which is worth per annum los. There 
are there 4 free tenants, of whom Avi'ce de Litlecote holds one 
messuage and 2 virgates of land, and pays per annum 8j. at the 
4 principal terms of the year. Augustine de Glyndon holds one 
messuage and one virgate of land, and pays per annum %s. at the 
said terms. Hamond Virgile holds one messuage and 2 virgates 
of land, and pays per annum 5^. at the said terms. William .... 
holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 
\s. at the said terms. Sum of the rents of the free tenants, 2\s. 
There are there 1 2 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage at the 
will of the lord, and they pay altogether per annum 19^. "i^d., at 
the feasts of Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer. 
Sum of the rents of the cottars, i^s. j^d. Sum of the value of the 
lands and tenements of Estkenete, yjs. i^d. 

Sum of the value of the said manor of Alyngton, £2$ is. 6d. 
Sum of the value of the hamlet of Estkenete, 77^. i^d. And thereof 
are owing, as appears above, 46^. 8^. And so the said hamlet is 
worth, clear, 30J. 5^^. 

/o/in la Warre, son and heir of Clarice la Warre, first-born 
daughter of the said John Tregoz, who is dead, and Sibill de 
Graunteson, second daughter of the said John Tregoz, are the next 
heirs of the said John Tregoz : the said /o/in la Warre is aged 
24 years, and the said Sibill 30 years and more. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 43. 



256 Wiltshire 



d^Dmuuti (Earl of CorniajalU 

I nC[UlSltlOn made before the King's escheator at Mere, 
X 1 8th November, 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and 
tenements whereof Edmund Earl of Cornwall died seised in his 
demesne as of fee, by the oath of John Cleimond, Waller de 
Horsinton, John de Imtnere, John de Hamslede, John de Burton, 
John Hodel, William Wiking, Thomas Wikinfr, William M . . . s, 
Adam le Taillur, Robert de la Legh, and Walter Rudel, who say that 

The said jE!dmund Earl of Cornwall held of the King in chief the 
manor of Mere in his demesne as of fee, by what service they 
know not. 

There is there a certain castle, the issues whereof are worth 
nothing per annum. There is there a certain capital messuage 
outside the castle, with a grange, ox-house, stable, and sheep- 
walks, and the profits and easements thereof are worth per annum 
2J. There are there in the demesnes 39 1^ acres of arable land, 
which are worth per annum £■] ibs. 2d., price of each acre of 
146^ acres, wjiich are under the hills of Wodecombe and Chate- 
combe and beyond, %d., and the price of each acre of 1 39 which are 
upon the hills zd., and the price of each acre of 106 which are 
in a certain old assart ^d. There are also there in the demesnes 
98 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum £b, price of 
each of 33 acres in Westmed 2od., and of 65 acres in Estmed and 
in la Brech and in the meadow de la Conewich iid. There are 
also there in the demesnes 43 acres upon Mapeldarehulle of land 
and pasture and in the close of la Conewich and Horscroft and 
47 acres of pasture, and they are worth per annum zzs. bd., price of 
the acre ^d. There is there in the demesnes a certain pasture 
in Swenecombe and beyond upon the hills for oxen, cows, and 
steers, and it is worth per annum 33J. ^d. And there is also there 
a certain pasture in the demesne upon the hills for the support of 
1200 sheep with several pasture in Wodecombe and Chatecombe, 
and it is worth per annum 100s. There is there a certain park 
called the park of la Conewich, in the which there are no beasts, 
and the herbage and pannage thereof are worth per annum £4., 
saving the maintenance of the hedge and the tithe of the herbage. 
There is also there another park called Deverlingewode, in the 
which there are no beasts, and the herbage and underwood thereof 
are worth per annum 10^. There are there 2 water-mills, and they 
are worth per annum £'j, saving the tithe. There is also there one 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 257 

fulling-mill, and it is worth per annum 26J. %d., and so is to farm, 
so, nevertheless, that the lord shall find the large timber for the 
repair of the same. There is there a certain mill-stone which 
is called Stanegrist, and it is worth per annum td. Sum of the 
value of the whole lordship, ;^34 ws. zd. 

There are there free tenants in socage, who pay per annum at 
the Nativity of the Lord, Easter, the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist, and the feast of St. Michael, of rent of assize £^ 3^. qd., 
and 3I lbs. of pepper, i lb. of cummin, and one pair of white 
gloves, which are worth per annum 3^., and at the feast of 
St. Martin of aid to the larder 1 3X. 2^^., and at the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist and the feast of St. Michael for certain works 
2S. 3^., of the which John de Pimperlegh holds in socage 3 virgates 
of land, one messuage, and one croft, and pays therefor per 
annum at the said 4 terms 23^., and at the feast of St. Martin of 
aid to the larder id., and he shall do suit at the hundred from 
3 weeks to 3 weeks, and he shall give heriot and relief when 
they shall happen. Roger Wiking holds by socage 3 virgates of 
land, and pays therefor per annum at the said 4 terms 13^. td., 
and at the feast of St. Martin 8^. of aid, and he shall do suit and 
give heriot and relief like the said John. Eustace de Barton holds by 
socage 2 virgates of land and 2 pourprestures, and pays therefor 
per annum at Easter i lb. of pepper and at Michaelmas %s. 7^/., and 
shall do suit and give heriot and relief like the above. Walter de 
Horsinton holds by socage 2^ virgates of land, one croft, and one 
pourpresture, and pays therefor per annum at 3 terms 6f(/. in 
equal portions, and at the feast of St. Michael 2^. 3^^., i^lbs. of 
pepper, and one pair of gloves or 6^/., and at the feast of St. Martin 
3</., and he shall do suit and shall give relief only for all service. 
John Cleimond holds by socage one virgate of land, one pourpresture, 
and half an acre of land, and pays therefor per annum at Easter 
i^d. and at Michaelmas zd., and he shall do suit and give heriot 
and relief. John de Hamstede holds by socage half a virgate of 
land, one messuage, 2 acres of land, and 2 stalls [seldas], and pays 
therefor per annum at Michaelmas zs. 6d., i lb. of pepper, and 
I lb. of cummin, and he shall do suit and give as above. John 
Hodel, junior, holds by socage half a virgate of land, one stall 
[seldom], z pourprestures, and pays therefor per annum los. 4^., 
to wit, at Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer, 7J. o%d. by equal 
portions, and at Michaelmas ^s. i\d., and he shall do suit as above 
and shall give relief only. John de Borton holds by socage one 
furlong of land, and pays therefor per annum zs. at Michaelmas, 
and he shall do suit and shall give relief only for all service. 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. H. ly 

1 8 



258 Wiltshire 

Robert de la Legh holds by socage 2 virgates of land, and pays 
therefor per annum at the said 4 principal terms 14^. by equal 
portions, and at the feast of St. Martin of aid to the larder 3^., and 
at Midsnmmer and Michaelmas for certain customs and services for 
carrying hay and com i M. proportionably, and he shall do suit and 
shall give heriot and relief as above. Alice and Agnes Martin hold 
half a virgate of land, and pay therefor at the 4 principal terms 
3J. \d. proportionably, at the feast of St. Martin of aid to the larder 
i9<f., and at Midsummer and Michaelmas for customs and services 
for carrying hay and com <)d., and they shall do suit and give as 
above. Richard Smert holds one messuage, and pays therefor 
per annum ibd. at the 4 principal terms, and shall do suit twice in 
the year at the view and shall give heriot and relief when they 
shall happen. Walter le Tannere holds one messuage with one 
meadow and one rood of land and one stall \jeldam\, and pays 
therefor per annum at the 4 terms \zd. and at the feast of 
St. Martin \\d., and he shall do suit twice in the year and shall 
give heriot and relief. Robert de Mere holds one pourpresture, and 
pays therefor per annum at Michaelmas 4</. Walter Rudel holds 
one pourpresture, and pays therefor per annum at Michaelmas zd. 
Adam le Dun holds one house, and pays therefor per annum \d. at 
Michaelmas. Alice la Mercere holds one house, and pays therefor 
per annum at Michaelmas 4</. William Wicker holds one stall, and 
pays per annum at Michaelmas 4<f. William le Marays holds one 
stall, and pays therefor per annum at Michaelmas bd. Richard 
Gomme holds 2 stalls, and pays per annum at Michaelmas 8</. The 
same Richard holds one house next the prison, and pays per annum 
at the 4 terms i6</. John Springot holds one stall, and pays per 
annum at Michaelmas bd. Hugh Carter holds one stall, and pays 
at Michaelmas ifd. Adam Imme {? Immere) holds one pourpresture, 
and pays per annum at Michaelmas \d. Juliana de la Legh holds 
one pourpresture, and pays per annum at Michaelmas zd. Roger 
Wiking, John de Borton, and William Wiking hold a certain part of 
land of the tenement which was of Richard de Burton, and pay per 
annum at Michaelmas iSd., and each of them shall give relief when 
it shall happen. 

There are there 2 virgators, 23 half-virgators, 10 furlongators, 
and 22 cottars holding in villeinage, who pay per annum at the 
4 principal terms of rent of assize £"7 i6s. ii^d., and at the feast 
of St. Martin of aid to the larder 59^. ii^d., and 140 cocks and 
hens for chersetum, which are worth per annum i is. Sd., price per 
head td., and at Midsummer and Michaelmas for customs and 
services remitted £S i$s. S^d.: of whom Crisiina Atte Welle^ 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 259 

William Ingeram, and William le Sopere hold i^ virgates of land in 
-villeinage, paying therefor per annum at the said 4 principal 
terms 1 is. 4^., at the feast of St. Martin of aid to the larder 4J. 4</., 
and one cock and 3 hens for chersete, and at Midsummer and 
Michaelmas for customs and services 3J. gj^. Agnes Attemersse 
holds one virgate of land, and pays at the said 4 terms 6j., at the 
feast of St. Martin 3^. for chersete, and at the said 2 terms for 
works 3^. rd. John Atteconewich holds half a virgate and one 
furlong of land and one house, and pays per annum at the 
3 principal terms f>s. %d. and at Michaelmas is. \\d., at the feast 
of St. Martin of aid 3^. \d. and chersete as above, and at the said 
2 terms for their works 6j. i^. Geoffrey Galye holds half a virgate 
of land, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms 4J., at the 
feast of St. Martin 19^. and chersete as above, and at the said 
2 terms for works is. bd. Nicholas Biestebrok holds half a virgate 
of land, and pays per annum at the 4 terms 45-., and at the feast of 
:St. Martin 19^. and chersete, and at the said 2 terms for works 
ts. Tfd. Nicholas Galye holds half a virgate of land, and pays per 
annum in all things like the said Nicholas. Reginald Biestewaiere 
holds half a virgate of land, and pays in all things per annum like 
the said Nicholas. Ellen Kinich holds half a virgate, and pays in 
all things per annum like the said Nicholas. William le Wice holds 
half a virgate of land and one pourpresture, and pays in all things 
per annum like the said Nicholas, and id. besides at Michaelmas 
for the said pourpresture. Walter Attebarew holds half a virgate of 
land, and pays in all things like the said Nicholas. Robert Atte- 
conewich holds half a virgate of land, and pays per annum in all 
things like the said Nicholas. William Goodrich holds half a virgate 
of land and one pourpresture, and pays in all things per annum 
like the said Nicholas, and id. more at Michaelmas for the rent of 
the pourpresture. Alice la Grant holds half a virgate of land, and 
pays per annum in all things like the said Nicholas. Hugh le Cuppe 
holds half a virgate of land, and pays in all things like the said 
Nicholas. John Flemeng holds half a virgate of land, and pays in 
all things per annum like the said Nicholas. Nicholas le Sweint 
holds half a virgate of land, and pays per annum at Christmas i6J^., 
at Easter \b\d., at Midsummer \i\d., and at Michaelmas nothing 
for a certain meadow of his tenement taken in the demesne, at the 
feast of St. Martin of aid for the larder is. id. and chersete as 
above, and at Midsummer and Michaelmas for his works 6s. $d. 
William Gomme holds half a virgate and certain pieces of land, and 
pays per annum at the said 4 terms 6s. 6d., at the feast of St. Martin 
iSd., and one cock and one hen for chersete, and at the said 



26o Wiltshire 

2 terms for works 6j. -^d. William Bouewater holds half a virgate 
of land and one croft, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms 
4J., at the feast of St. Martin rs. 7^., and one cock and 3 hens, and 
at the said 2 terms for works f>s. 3^. Richard Gomme holds half 
a virgate of land and one pourpresture, and pays per annum at 
Christmas \id., at Easter \id., at Midsummer ?>d., and at Michael- 
mas id. of the rent of the pourpresture, and not more, for a certain 
meadow taken in the demesne, at the feast of St. Martin ig^/. and 
one cock and 3 hens, and at the said 2 terms for his works 6s. $d. 
John Huthe holds half a virgate of land, one house, and 2 pour- 
prestures, and pays per annum at 3 terms y if\d., and at Michael- 
mas ibid., at the feast of St. Martin igd., and chersete as above, 
and at the said 2 terms for his works 6s. \d. Nicholas Martin holds 
half a virgate of land except one acre, and pays per annum at the 
4 principal terms is. 3 J., at the feast of St. Martin igc/., and 
chersete as above, and at the said 2 terms for his works 6s. ^d. 
Ralph Hach holds half a virgate of land, and pays per annum at 
Christmas 12c/., at Easter i2</., at Midsummer 9^., and at Michael- 
mas nothing for a certain meadow of his tenement taken in the 
demesne, at the feast of St. Martin igt/., and chersete as above, 
and at the said 2 terms for his works 6s. ^d. John Aiiehrok holds 
half a virgate of land, and pays per annum in all things like the 
ssLid Ralph and id. more at Midsummer. Nicholas Kinich holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms 4^., 
at the feast of St. Martin 19^/., and chersete as above, and at the 
said 2 terms for his works %s. j^d. Sibilla Galye holds one furlong 
of land, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms zs., at the 
feast of St. Martin for aid to the larder 9^., one cock and 3 hens 
for chersete, and at the said 2 terms for her works zs. Thomas 
Galye holds and pays per annum in all things like the said Sibilla. 
Alice Henton holds and pays in all things per annum likewise. 
Amulphus Attemulle holds and pays per annum in all things like- 
wise. Alice Precator holds and pays in all things likewise. Edmund 
Red holds and pays likewise in all things per annum. John Cole 
holds one furlong of land, one pourpresture, and pays in all things 
per annum like the said Sibilla, and id. more at Michaelmas of 
the rent of the pourpresture. William Attebrigge holds one furlong 
of land, and pays per annum in all things like the said Sibella, and 
14^. more for his works proportionally at the said 2 terms. William 
Hymek holds one furlong of land, one stall, and one water-mill, 
and pays per annum at the 3 principal terms "^s. 6d., and at the 
fourth term, to wit, Michaelmas, 3^. id., at the feast of St. Martin 
3J., one cock and one hen for chersete, and at the said 2 terms for 



I 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 261 

his works \ifd. Adam Atteharewe holds one messuage and one 
croft, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms \bd., at the 
feast of St. Martin of aid to the larder td., one cock and 3 hens 
for chersete, and at the said 2 terms for his works zs. zd. Adam 
Red holds one messuage with crofts, and pays per annum at the 
4 principal terms i?>d., at the feast of St. Martin 6d., and chersete 
as above, and at the said 2 terms for his works iid. Reginald 
Alwine holds one messuage with crofts, and pays per annum in all 
things like the said Adam. William Precator holds one messuage 
with crofts, and pays in all things per annum like the said Adam. 
William Imeston holds one messuage with crofts, and pays per 
annum at the 4 principal terms 8</., at the feast of St. Martin of 
aid lid., one cock and one hen for chersete, and at the said 2 terms 
for his works 1 2d. Roger Atlebrok holds one cottage with a curti- 
lage, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms lod., at the 
feast of St. Martin of aid to the larder 6<f., and at the said 2 terms 
for his works ibd. Thomas Harding holds one cottage with a 
curtilage, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms bd., at the 
feast of St. Martin bd., at the said 2 terms for his works izd. 
William le Maf holds one cottage with a curtilage, and pays per 
annum at the 4 principal terms izd., at the feast of St. Martin 
3^. id., and at the said 2 terms for his works \zd. Goscelin Uppe- 
linche holds one cottage, and pays per annum at Michaelmas zd., 
and at the said 2 terms for his works i^d. Walter le Carpenter holds 
one cottage with a curtilage, and pays per annum at the 4 principal 
terms lod., at the feast of St. Martin bd., and at the said 2 terms 
for his works \id. Hugh Attelupegate holds one cottage with crofts 
and one pourpresture, and pays per annum at ^ terms b^d., and at 
the fourth term, viz., at the feast of St. Michael i\d., at the feast of 
St. Martin ^d., and at the said 2 terms for their works bd. Geoffrey 
Attermerse holds one cottage with a curtilage and one plot of land, 
and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms iid., at the feast of 
St. Martin ^d., and at the said 2 terms for his works z^d. Walter 
le Stodhurde holds one cottage with a curtilage and one pour- 
presture, and pays per annum at the 3 principal terms 42^., and at 
Michaelmas ^d., at the feast of St. Martin i^d., and at the said 
2 terms for his works z^d. Nicholas Mongo holds one cottage, and 
pays per annum at the 4 principal terms \d, Anketil Biestebrok 
holds one croft, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms 18^., 
at the feast of St. Martin 4^., and at the said 2 terms for his works 
z^d. Avice de Houteneford holds one house, and pays per annum 
at the feast of St. Michael id. Agnes Braibon holds one cottage 
with a curtilage, and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms i M. 
1 8 • 



262 Wiltshire 

Robert Goding holds one cottage and one pourpresture, and pays 
per annum at the 3 principal terms /{d., and at Michaelmas i^d. 
Thomas le Carpenter holds one cottage with a curtilage, and pays 
per annum at the 4 principal" terms iid. Geoffrey le Tannere holds 
one cottage with a curtilage, and pays per annum at the said terms 
2J. Nicholas Belamy holds one cottage with a curtilage, and pays 
per annum at the said 4 terms 8^., at the feast of St. Martin zd. 
Edith Prior holds one house, and pays per annum at Michaelmas 
bd. Robert Galye holds one house, and pays per annum at 4 terms 
4//., and \d. for works. Nicholas Gomme holds the demesne which 
was of Richard de Barton to farm, to wit, one messuage, 49 acres 
of land on the hills, 7^ acres under the hills, 3 acres of meadow 
and pasture for sheep, which is worth 6j. per annum, and he pays 
therefor per annum at Easter and Michaelmas 31J. 

Sum of the whole rent of assize and larder, with chersete and 
customs and services, ^zb i-js. bd. 

There is there a certain custom of the merchants which is called 
Scottale at the feast of St. Michael, and it is worth per annum 
6s. Sd. There is there a certain hundred which is worth in cert 
money for aid and the tourn of the sheriff and tethingpem (.-*) 
;^4 3^. id. per annum, of the which the tithing of Kingeston pays 
per annum at the feast of St. Martin 2s. 6^d., at the feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary Ss., and at Hokeday 2s. 6^d. 
The tithing of Chadenwich pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Martin 2s. 6^d., and at Hokeday 2s. 6^d. The tithing of 
Cuowei pays per annum at the feast of St. Martin 2s. bd., at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 3^. 8^., and at Hokeday 3J. bd. 
The tithing of Sturton pays per annum at the feast of St. Martin 
5J. id., at the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 7^., and at Hokeday 
5^. id. The tithing of Seles pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Martin loj. 2d., at the Annunciation of the Blessed I\Iary 5^., 
and at Hokeday 10s. 2d. The tithing of la Wodelande pays per 
annum at the feast of St. Martin 3^. bd. and at Hokeday y. bd. 
The tithing of Mere pays per annum at the feast of St. Martin 
zs. Sd. and at Hokeday 2s. 8d. John de Burton and Eustace de Borton 
pay per annum at the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary \%d. The pleas and perquisites of the said hundred and of 
the halemote with the fines and heriots are worth per annum loos. 

Sum of the hundred with the Scotall and perquisites, £cj gs. lod. 

Sum of the whole value of the said manor, ;^7o iSs. bd. 

The lord Edward King of England is the next heir of the said 
Edmund, and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 44 (7). 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 263 

CEDtnunD (Earl of CorntoalL 

T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Cosham before the King's escheator, 

J. isth November, 28 Edward I [1300], of the lands and tene- 
ments of the which Edmund Earl of Cornwall was seised in his 
demesne on the day that he died, by the oath of Richard le Marker, 
Elias Pruet, Richard de Cumerwell, Walter Willam, Henry Willam, 
Richard de Hacte, Alan Bruton, Robert the Clerk, Robert de Gaston^ 
William de Gudeston, Robert . . . , and Henry the Clerk, who 
say that 

Edmund Earl of Cornwall held the manor of Corsham in his 
demesne as of fee of the King in chief, by what service they 
know not. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with 2 small gardens, 
and it is worth per annum iid. Also the third part of a certain 
meadow which is called Mintesmed, which contains i^ acres, and 
is worth per annum is. There is there a vivary, and it is worth 
per annum iid. Also a certain park called Estpark, in the which 
there are 6 wild beasts, which is worth per annum £^ 10s. Also 
another park called Westpark, in the which are wild beasts, and 
it is worth per annum i^s. 4*/. There are there 2 water-mills, 
and they are worth by the year io6j. 8^., nevertheless the lord shall 
find the large timber for the repair of the same, and the said mills 
are at farm in the hands of the serfs. There are there i zs. b\d. of 
rent of assize newly arented, to be paid at the feasts of Easter and 
St. Michael, of the which the vicar of Corsham holds one small 
place and pays per annum ibd. Felicia la Herre of the increase of 
the rent of her tenement 3^. td. Adam de Scalera holds one cottage 
with a curtilage and 2 acres of land, and pays per annum zs. 
William de Schenpehouse holds 4 acres of land, and pays per annum 
3^. Andrew Tuf holds 4. acres of land, and pays per annum \zd. 

William Lomkyn holds one curtilage, and pays per annum bd. 

William de Goude and Ralph le Parker hold one ditch, and pay per 
annum zd. Gilbert de Westrop holds a certain house, and pays 
per annum zd. Nicholas le Taillour holds a certain house, and 
pays per annum id. Peter de Soterwik holds one place, and pays 
per annum id. Isabella la White holds one place, and pays per 
annum i^d. William Degwyne holds one place, and pays per 
annum 4^. Walter Danyel holds one place of land, and pays per 
annum i\d. William Elys holds one place, and pays per annum 

\\d. There are there 22 customars, each of whom if he shall have 
at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 7 pigs shall give to the lord 



264 Wiltshire 

one, and they are estimated one year with another as 6 pigs, which 
are worth 2^., price of the pig 4^. There are there 24 customars, 
each of whom if he shall have pigs of his own bringing up on the 
day of St. Martin shall give for each pig which he shall kill or sell 
id., and they are worth per annum iid. There are there certain 
fairs in the feast of St. Bartholomew, and they are worth per annum 
40J. The pleas and perquisites of all the courts of Cosham are 
worth per annum, together with fines, reliefs, and heriots, ;^io. 
Sum, ;^2 3 9 J. (i\d. 

There are there 345 acres i rood of arable land, 29 acres of 
meadow in the demesne with one dovecote, and 62 virgates of land 
of villeinage at Corsham, and at Stratton 9 virgators likewise of 
villeinage, and 2 free tenants, of whom Robert de Gatesturd holds 
3 virgates of land by socage, paying per annum 40J., and he shall 
give heriot relief when it shall happen, and shall make suit at the 
court of Corsham from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. Alice de Thyngeley 
holds I i virgates of land by socage, pays per annum los., and 
shall give heriot, etc., as above. And the villeins of Corsham 
and Stratton hold the said lands, meadow with the dovecote, 
villeinage, and the rent of the said freemen in rack rent, by the 
charter o{ Richard ioxxner\y Earl of Cornwall, to have to them and 
their successors for ever, they paying therefor per annum no 
marks at Easter and Michaelmas. Sum, £']^ 6s. Sd. 

Sum of the sums aforesaid, £g6 16s. z\d. 

The said Edmund was seised in his demesne as of fee of ;^2o of 
yearly rent to be taken by the hands of the Abbot of Malmeshury 
at Easter and Michaelmas, which the said Abbot was wont to pay 
into the Exchequer, and which the lord Henry King of England, 
father of the now King, gave to Richard formerly Earl of Cornwall, 
father of the said Edmund. 

The lord Edward King of England is the next heir of the said 
Edmund, and is of full age. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 44 (8). 



CDmunn Carl of CotntoalU 

TT • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made before the King's escheator at Wylton, 
X 4th December, 29 Edward I [1300], of the lands and tene- 
ments of the which Edmund Earl of Cornwall was seised on the 
day that he died, by the oath of Robert Beede, Hugh Coterel, John 
Goldron, Henry de Netherbur\ Michael le Tanneri, William le Escriveyn, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 265 

John le Revere, Robert Maddok, Robert Curteys, Thomas le Prute, 
Richard Maddok, and Nicholas Ragenyl, who say that 

The said Edmund held the borough of Wylton, in co. Wilts, of 
the King in chief, by what service they do not know, which said 
borough Henry King of England, father of the now King, gave to 
Richard King of Germany, father of the said Edmund. 

There are there certain burgesses and free tenants, of whom 
Peter Belegamb holds divers burgages and tenements, and pays 
therefor per annum at the feast of St. Andrew of landgable 5^. ']\d., 
and at Easter and Michaelmas of rent of assize .... 4^/. 
John Goldron holds divers tenements, and pays therefor per annum 
of landgable at the feast of St. Andrew zi\d. Robert le Nedlere 
holds divers burgages, and pays therefor per annum at the feast 
of St. Andrew of landgable \%d. The rector of the church of 
St. Michael holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum at the 
feast of St. Andrew of landgable .... \d. Peter Goldron 
holds divers tenements, and pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Andrew of landgable lod., and at Easter and Michaelmas of 
rent of assize . . s. 6d. William de Button holds divers tenements, 
and pays per annum at the feast of St. Andrew of landgable ']\d. 
Ralph Hervy holds a certain burgage, and pays per annum at the 
feast of St. Andrew of landgable r\d. William le Escriveyne holds 
a certain tenement, and pays per annum at the feast of St. Andrew 
of landgable i\d. Roger le Tannere holds a certain tenement, and 
pays per annum at the feast of St. Andrew of landgable z\d. 
Richard Russel holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum at 
the said feast of landgable ihd. Cristina la Vyntere holds a certain 
tenement, and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable ^d. 
Michael le Tannere holds a certain burgage, and pays per annum 
at the said feast of landgable 5^. John de la Mare holds a certain 
tenement, and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable 10^. 
Nicholas Ragenyl holds a certain tenement, and pays therefor per 
annum at the said feast of landgable 5^. John le Mous holds divers 
tenements, and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable 15^^. 
Matilda de Bedejord holds divers tenements, and pays per annum 
at the said feast of landgable 15^. Philip the Cook and Robert de 
Brudecumb hold divers tenements, and pay per annum at the said 
feast of landgable 15^^. The rector of the church of St. Nicholas 
in West street holds certain tenements, and pays per annum at the 
said feast of landgable dd. Nicholas Laurence holds divers tene- 
ments, and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable i^^d. 
Thomas le Repere holds a certain tenement, and pays at the said 
feast of landgable zhd., and at Easter and Michaelmas of rent of 



266 Wiltshire 

assize is. Robert de Brudecumh holds divers tenements, and pays 
per annum at the said feast of landgable i\d., and at Easter and 
Michaelmas of rent of assize 8^. %d. The Warden of the Hospital 
of St. John without the gate of Wylton holds divers tenements, 
and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable 4-r. (^\d. Hugh 
Coterel holds divers tenements, and pays at Easter and Michaelmas 
of rent of assize 8</., and of landgable at the feast of St. Andrew 
2J. \\d. Laurence Coleman holds a certain tenement, and pays 
per annum at the feast of St. Andrew of landgable i\d. Robert 
Curteys holds a certain burgage and divers tenements, and pays 
per annum at the said feast of landgable 9^^. John le Clerk holds 
divers tenements, and pays per annum at the said feast of land- 
gable 5c/. Robert Maddok holds divers tenements, and pays per 
annum at the said feast of landgable 5^. Richard de Staun/ord 
holds a certain burgage, and pays per annum at the said feast of 
landgable ']\d. The lepers of St. Giles hold a certain tenement, 
and pay per annum at the said feast of landgable 3^. John le Reede 
holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum at Easter and 
Michaelmas of rent of assize bd. Robert Beede holds divers tene- 
ments, and pays per annum at the feast of St. Andrew of landgable 
%^d. John le Wolf holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum 
at the said feast of landgable i^d. Henry de Netherbury holds 
divers tenements, and pays at the said feast of landgable iz\d. 
John Co/" holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum at the said 
feast of landgable id. The convent of the Abbey of Wylton holds 
a certain tenement, and pays per annum at the said feast of land- 
gable td. Sarra la Tanner holds a certain tenement, and pays at 
the said feast of landgable i^^d. William de Werminstre and Peter 
Belegaumbe hold divers tenements, and pay per annum at the said 
feast of landgable t\d. Henry Thorand holds a certain tenement, 
and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable ijf^. Philip 
Cocus, Robert de Brudecumbe, Robert de Wormanhale, and Peter Wyppe 
hold certain tenements, and pay per annum at the said feast of 
landgable t\d. Richard Maddok holds a certain tenement, and 
pays per annum at the said feast of landgable sd. Philip Cocus, 
Robert de Brudecumbe, and John Pycot hold divers tenements, and 
pay per annum at Easter and Michaelmas of rent of assize bd., 
and at the feast of St. Andrew of landgable is. id. Alice Coyjyn 
holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Andrew of landgable 5^. Edith Nutrix holds a certain tene- 
ment, and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable \\d. 
William de Button, Thomas le Prute, and John le Revere hold divers 
lands, and pay per annum at the said feast of landgable -jd. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 267 

Margery Pycot holds a certain tenement, and pays per annum at 
Easter and Michaelmas of rent of assize s^-., and at the feast of 
St. Andrew of landgable z\d. Henry de Netherhury holds a certain 
burgage and tenement, and pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Andrew of landgable 17ft/. John Walleraund holds a certain 
tenement, and pays per annum at the said feast of landgable 5^. 

Sum of the rent of assize, 29^. zd. 

Sum of the landgable, \%s, i\d. 

There is there a certain place which was in the hand of the said 
Earl for default of tenant, which is worth per annum ^d. Also 
a certain place, the moiety whereof was of the said Earl, and 
it is worth per annum rod. Also a certain market 3 times in each 
week, to wit, on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, whereof the 
toll with the toll of tangabul, flesgabul, stoggabul, and stallage, 
is worth per annum \zs. 

The said Earl took a certain toll each year at the bridge of 
Ayleswode, outside New Sarum, of fish and salt crossing over 
the same belonging to the said borough, which is worth per 
annum 6j. %d. There is there a certain fair at the feast of 
St. Matthew lasting from the hour of 9 on the vigil of St. Matthew 
up to the hour of 9 on the day of St. Matthew, which fair is of the 
Abbess of Wylton and the said Edmund the Earl, and the toll of the 
Earl is worth 6c/. Sum, z\s. \d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court with brewgable are worth 
per annum 40^. 

Sum of the whole value of the said borough per annum, 
£b I2J. \\\d., of the which the lepers of St. Giles without Wylton' 
take each year £\ of the gift (of the ancestors of the) Kings of 
England, and so the said borough is worth per annum, clear, 
l%s. \\\d. The said Earl died seised in his demesne as of fee of 
40J. of . . . . to be taken by the hands of William Cheynduit 
for his tenement in Bereford in the said county. Sum, \os. 

Sum of the sums of all the extents in co. Wilts, £\<i^ fs. "j^d., 
subtracting £4. which the lepers without Wilton take by the year of 
the gift of the ancestors of the King. And so the sum is, clear, 
;^I92 7^. 7f</. 

Edward, now King of England, kinsman of the said Earl, is his 
next heir .... years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward /, No. 44 (9). 



268 Wiltshire 



CDttiunD cBarl of Corntcall. 

In(][UlSltlOn made at Chippenham, 25th November, 
28 Edward I [1299], before the King's escheator, of the 
lands and tenements whereof Edmund Earl of Cornwall was seised 
in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died, by the oath 
of John son of Walter, John Rugebek, Robert son of Walter, Hugh 
de Alto/tes, William Adens, Robert son of Thomas, John le Messer, 
Thomas Andreu, John le White, William le Neweman, Richard de Stoke 
of Eton, and William de Clavering, who say that 

Chippenham. 

The said Edmund held in his demesne as of fee the manor of 
Cippenham of the Abbot of Westminster in chief by the service 
of 50J. per annum, to be paid to the said Abbot and his successors 
at the feasts of St. Michael and the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary. 

There is in the same manor a capital messuage with 2 gardens, 
which is worth per annum, with the fruits and herbage and fishing 
in the ditches about the manor, 13J. 3^. Also a certain place with 
osiers, which is worth per annum loi-. There are there 450 acres 
of arable land by the lesser hundred in the demesne, which are 
worth per annum £\i ^s., price of the acre bd. Also 40 acres 
of meadow, which are worth per annum bos., price of the acre \%d. 
There is there a certain park next to the manor without beasts, 
the profit whereof as in herbage is worth per annum 30J. Also 
a certain other park without beasts which is called Horteleye, with 
a certain foreign wood, the profit whereof in herbage and heath 
within the said park and wood is worth per annum 4^. There is 
there a certain pasture which is called Eldefeld, which is worth per 
annum i-]\d. There are in the said manor certain free tenants, 
who pay per annum of rent of assize £10 lis. lod., of whom 
John de la Penne holds one messuage and one virgate of land, 
and pays per annum 1 3^., to wit, at the feasts of St. Michael and 
the Annunciation of the Blessed INIary by equal portions. John 
de Ashele holds one messuage and 2 virgates of land, and pays 
per annum \y. %d., viz., at the feast of St. Michael %s. bd., at the 
feast of St. Thomas the Apostle zs. 'jd., and at the feast of the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist is. ']d. And John son of Walter 
holds 3 parts of one virgate of land, and pays per annum zs. id. at 
the 2 terms aforesaid, and at the Nativity of the Lord i lb. of 
cummin, price \\d. And John de Ruggebek holds one messuage 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 269 

and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum \os. \d. at the same 
terms. And Robert son of Walter holds one messuage and 2 virgates 
of land, and pays per annum izs. ^d. at the same terms, and i lb. of 
cummin at the Nativity of the Lord, price i^d. Simon de Forwele 
holds one messuage and one virgate of land and 3 cottages, and 
pays per annum i^d. at the said terms. Simon de Merewynkey holds 
one croft, and pays per annum a halfpenny at the feasts of St. Thomas 
the Apostle and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist by equal 
portions. Hugh West holds one croft, and pays per annum 5^. 
at the same terms. Ralph atte Grove holds one piece of land, and 
pays per annum i\d. at the same terms. Alice Petit holds one 
messuage and one virgate of land, and pays per annum 10^. \d. 
at the feasts of St. Michael and the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary. John Athelard holds one messuage and half a virgate of 
land, and pays per annum i zd. at the said terms. Richard Mayn 
holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 
i8</. at the same terms. William le Newman holds one messuage 
and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 135-. at the same 
terms. Hugh de Altoftes holds one messuage and one virgate of 
land, and pays per annum 7J. 5a'. at the same terms. John le White 
holds one messuage and the fourth part of one virgate of land, and 
pays per annum \s. at the same terms. Ralph Lewis holds one 
messuage and the fourth part of one virgate of land and one piece 
of land, and pays per annum 4^. \d. at the said terms. Adam 
Gurdon and Henry Garland hold 2 messuages and half a virgate 
of land, and pay per annum los. lod. at the same terms. John 
Tuhelin holds one croft, and pays per annum zs. zd. at the same 
terms. Thomas Andreu holds one messuage and half a virgate of 
land, and pays per annum zs. at the same terms. Robert son of 
Robert holds one messuage and one virgate of land, and pays 
per annum i zs. $d. at the same terms. John atte Grove holds 
5 acres of land, and pays per annum \bd. at the same terms. 
Richard Andreu holds 3 cottages, and pays per annum %d. at the 
same terms. Margery, the relict of Walter son of Robert, holds one 
messuage and \\ virgates of land, and pays per annum \d. at 
the feast of St. Michael. Philip de Hastyng holds one messuage 
and 2 virgates of land, and pays per annum zs. at the same terms. 
John Crome holds half a virgate of land, and pays 6s. at the 
said terms. Thomas Andreu holds half an acre of land, and pays 
S</. at the said terms. Silvester Broun holds 2 crofts, and pays 
zs. zd. at the same terms. The Abbess of Burnham holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays \os. at the said terms. John le Parke re 
holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays izs. at 



270 Wiltshire 

the same terms. Stephen le Mareschal holds one messuage and 
half a virgate of land, and pays \d. at the feast of St. Michael. 
John le Maysier holds one messuage and one virgate of land, and 
pays ltd. at the same terms. William Adens holds half a virgate 
of land, and pays 4J. at the said terms. Robert son of Thomas holds 
one messuage and one virgate of land, and pays izs. at the said 
terms. Alice, who was the wife of Robert le Clerk, holds 3 acres 
of land, and pays 2^. id. at the said terms. Thomas de StonehuUe 
holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 
los. at the said terms. Matilda Norreis holds half a virgate of land, 
and pays per annum is. at the said terms. John le Tayllour holds 
4 acres of land, and pays per annum i8</. at the said terms. Ralph 
atte Naldren holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and 
pays per annum is. i \d. at the said terms. Andrew Rohilard holds 
one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 3^. bd. 
at the said terms. Walter Bromeland holds half a virgate of land, 
and pays per annum lod. at the said terms. Geoffrey atte Dene holds 
one cottage and one acre of land, and pays per annum i id. at the 
said terms. John Ayrewyn holds 3 cottages and 2 acres of land, 
and pays per annum 3^. at the said terms. Walter Vallet holds one 
messuage and one acre of land, and pays per annum \%d. at the 
said terms. Walter Reynyld holds one messuage and one virgate of 
land, and pays per annum -js. at the said terms. Emma Edward 
holds one messuage and one acre of land, and pays per annum ^d. 
at the said terms. John Knyght holds one messuage and half an 
acre of land, and pays per annum ^d. at the said terms. Robert atte 
Dene holds one acre of land, and pays per annum \id. at the 
said terms. Matilda Waryn holds one messuage and \\ acres of 
land, and pays per annum \%d. at the said terms. Matilda atte 
Naldre holds one messuage and i^ acres of land, and pays per 
annum 1 8i. at the said terms. 

There are in the said manor 16J virgates of land in villeinage, 
which pay per annum of rent of assize 28^. 2\d. at the feasts of 
St. Michael and the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary by equal 
portions, to wit, each virgate loy. And they give per annum 
looj. \^d. of tallage, viz., at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, 
each virgate ds. id. And they shall do likewise certain works 
and customs which are worth per annum £1$ -js. sH, to wit, 
each virgate its. i\d. There is there one virgate and the fourth 
part of one virgate of land of another tenure, which pay per 
annum of rent of assize ziid., and of tallage ']s. bd. at the said 
terms. And they do works and customs which are worth per 
annum 31 J. o\d. There is there one virgate and a half of land 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 271 

of the third tenure, which pay per annum of rent of assize 4J. 6(/., 
and of tallage gj. \\d. at the said terms, and they do works 
and customs which are worth per annum \zs. \\\d. Moreover, 
there are there z\ virgates of land of various tenures, of the 
which one virgate pays per annum of rent of assize zs., and of 
tallage ts. id. at the said terms, and does works and customs which 
are worth per annum loj. s^d. And half a virgate of land which 
pays per annum of rent of assize lod., and of tallage 3X. o^d. at 
the said terms, and does works and customs which are worth 
per annum 4.S. 5|«/. And one half-virgate of land which pays per 
annum of rent of assize iSd., and of tallage $s. at the common 
terms, and gives 8 eggs at Easter which are worth id. And the 
fourth part of one virgate of land pays per annum of rent of assize 
I3</., and of tallage iSd. at the common terms, and gives at Easter 
4 eggs, price half a farthing. 

Also there are there certain cottagers, who pay per annum of 
rent of assize 7^. 3d?, at the 2 principal terms by equal portions, 
whereof Geoffrey Kolle/ot{}) holds one cottage and pays per 
annum 6d. at the said 2 terms. Thomas le Mileward holds one 
cottage, and pays per annum 6d. at the said terms. Roger 
Wrennehale holds one cottage, and pays per annum iid. at the 
said terms. William Ruddok holds one cottage, and pays per 
annum at the feast .... Waller son of Walter holds one 
cottage, and pays per annum id. at the same term. William de 
Tayllour holds one garden, and pays per annum 2^-. at the same 
^erms. Nicholas de Cannok holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
5</. at the said terms. Edyth Lewyn holds one cottage, and pays 
TDer annum iid. at the said terms. William atte . . . mete holds 
one cottage, and pays per annum 18^. at the said terms. There 
are there certain tenants at the will of the lord, who pay per annum 
of rent of assize %s. at the said 2 terms, of whom Isabella atte Brome 
holds a certain parcel and pays per annum \od. at the said terms. 
Matilda le Long holds a certain pasture, and pays per annum is. \d. 
at the same terms. Peter Beretisham holds a certain place of land, 
and pays per annum bd. at the same terms. Laurence Aired holds 
one cottage, and pays per annum %d. at the said terms. Ralph 
Faber holds a certain pasture, and pays per annum i\d. at the same 
terms. Cecilia Alisaundre holds one piece of meadow, and pays 
per annum ^d. at the said terms. John atte Garden holds a certain 
piece of meadow, and pays per annum \\d. at the said terms. 
Mahil atte Naldre holds a certain pasture, and pays 9^. per annum 
at the said terms. Richard atte Gerston holds one piece of land, 
and pays per annum zod. at the same terms. The heir of William 



272 Wiltshire 

atte Wyk holds half an acre of land, and pays per annum \id. at the 
said terms. Richard Gilbert holds 4 acres of heath, and pays per 
annum Afd. at the said terms. There is there of cert view per 
annum 20J. at the feast of St. Michael. The pleas and perquisites 
of the court, with the view of frankpledge, are worth per annum 
26^. 8^. 

Sum of the value of the extent of Cippenham, ;^55 15J. 'i\d. and 

half a farthing. 

Eton and Wyndelesover. 

The said Edmund held in his demesne as of fee on the day that 
he died 38^. ^d. of the yearly rent of divers free tenants in the vill 
of Eton and Wyndelesover of the King in chief, but by what 
services the jurors know not, of \\\iOXi\ John Andreuy of Eton, holds 
one messuage, and pays per annum 2^. zd. at the 2 principal terms 
by equal portions. William de Clavering holds one messuage, and 
pays per annum \s. at the said terms. John le Bakere holds one 
messuage, and pays per annum iid. at the same terms. William le 
Brethere holds one messuage, and pays per annum i6</. at the said 
terms. Hugh Hardewyn holds the moiety of one messuage, and 
pays per annum %d. at the same terms. Dionisia, the relict of 
John le Bakere, holds one messuage, and pays per annum \\d. at 
the same terms. The heir of John Openore, of Wyndelesor, holds 
one messuage and half a carucate of land, and pays per annum 
zos. 6d. at the same terms. Robert le Gardiner holds the moiety of 
one messuage, and pays per annum bd. at the same terms. Ralph 
Bausan holds the moiety of one messuage, and pays per annum 
2^. td. at the same terms. John le Viker holds one messuage, and 
pays per annum i zd. at the same terms. Hugh le Brest holds the 
moiety of one messuage, and pays per annum \2id. at the same 
terms. Dionisia Blaunkpomel holds the moiety of one messuage, 
and pays per annum 9*/. at the same terms. The relict of Ralph 
atte Wik holds the moiety of one messuage, and pays per annum 
8^. at the same terms. There is there \s. of the cert view of Eton 
by the year, to wit, at the feast of St. Michael. The pleas and 
perquisites of the court there are worth per annum 13J. ^d. The 
toll of Eton is worth per annum \os. 

Sum of the value of the extent of Eton, 65 j. id. 

Sum of the sums, £^() os. ()\d. and half a farthing, of the which 
in rent resolute to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster for the 
manor of Cippenham, 505-. per annum. And to the Prior of 
Bermundeseye for alms to the monks of Bermundeseye, bos. And 
to the lord of Dachet for a certain place in the park next the 
manor, bs. %d. by the year. And to the lord of Huntercoumbe for 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 273 

a certain tenement which John de Asshele holds of the King, 4^. per 
annum. And to the lord of Hugelegh for a certain tenement 
which Robert son of Walter holds of the King, ds. per annum. And 
to Ralph de Bumham for a certain tenement which Silvester Broun 
holds of the King, zs. per annum. And to the farmers of the vill 
of Wyndelesovere for the tenements of Wyndelesovere contained 
in the extent of Eton, 3^. And in the allowance of the reeve of 
Cippenham io\d. And in the allowance of the park-keeper next 
the manor io\d. And in the allowance of the park-keeper of 
Hertelegh loi^. And in the allowance of the beadle of Cippenham 
^id. And in the allowance of the villeins of Cippenham for a 
certain custom which is called Medeshipe, 4J. bd., with one quarter 
of wheat, price 4^. 

Sum of the said reprise is £•] ^s. i\d. And there remains, clear, 
£si i-js. 8i^* 

Sum of the reprises £b i is. 8d., and so the sum is, clear, 
£51 gs. t^d. and half a farthing. 

Of knights' fees and advowsons of churches there they know 
nothing. 

[Heir as above.] 

Chan. Ing. p.m., 28 Edward /, No. 44(22). 



(EDmunD (Earl of CorntoalL 

The honor of Walingeford in divers counties. 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Walingeford before the King's 
X escheator, 20th December, 29 Edward I [1300], of the foreign 
rents belonging to the honor of Walingeford in divers counties, of 
the which Edmund Earl of Cornwall was seised on the day that he 
died, by the oath of Robert de Verney, Ralph Broun, etc., etc., who 
say that 

The said Edmund held of the King in chief 16^. iid. of rent 
belonging to the said honor in co. Oxon. 

The said Earl likewise held i6j. %d. of cert view belonging to 
the said hundred at the term of Easter, in co. Wilts, viz., of the 
town of Mayden Wynterburne of part of the said honor 6d. ; of 
the town of Haselburweye for the same 2s. ; of the town of Chilton 
for the same ds. Sd. ; of the town of Manynton for the same dd. ; 

* It is uncertain whether the lines from " And in the allowance," etc., to 
" £s^ ^7^' 8i(/." are intended to be crossed out, or merely underlined. 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. ti. 1 8 

1 9 



274 Wiltshire 

of the town of Parva Okebume for the same bd. ; of the towns of 
Draycote and Kokkabergh for the same 2S. ; of the town of 
Walcote for the same 18^. ; of the town of Redburne for the same 
2S. ; and for the town of Chaggely for the same iid. 

The same Earl held once a year one view in co. Wilts, after 
Easter, to wit, the view of Okeburne, whereof the pleas and 
perquisites are worth per annum %s. ^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward /, No. 44 (26). 



(CDmunt) c^arl of CorntoalL 

The honor of St. Wallericus in divers counties. 

Inquisition taken at North Oseneye before the King's 
escheator, 3rd December, 29 Edward I [1300], of the foreign 
rents in divers counties to the honor of St. Walericus belonging, 
of the which Edmund Earl of Cornwall vizls seised in his demesne 
as of fee on the day that he died, by the oath of Waller de Wyghthull, 
Stephen de Abyndon, Henry de Grey, etc., etc., who say that 

The said Edmund held in his demesne as of fee of the King in 
chief, to wit, in co. Oxford, £\i 3^. ^d., of rent of assize of 
North Oseney. 

The same Edmund held in the same way bos. of rent of assize 
of North Oseneye by the year, to be taken of the heirs o{ Adam de 
Pyreton (?) for a certain tenement in Colkote, in co. Wilts, to wit, 
at the feast of St. Michael. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 44. (27). 



CDmunn Carl oC CorntDalL 

I nqUlSltlOn made at Wa . . . . before the King's 

X. escheator, 29 Edward I [1300], of the knights' fees to the- 

honor of Walingford belonging, of the which Edmund Earl of 

Cornwall was seised, by the oath oi Robert de Verney, Ralph Broun, 

etc., who say that 

Hugh Dirmal holds of the said honor 2 knight's fees inGarynges(.?). 

And Hugh le Despenser holds of the said honor 2 fees in Vasterne, 
Wotton Basset, and Brodetoune, in co. Wilts, which are worth per 
annum, clear, £^^0. And Henry Tyeys holds of the said honor 
2 fees in Chilton, Parva Okeburne, and Manington, in the said 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 275 

county, which are worth per annum, clear, £\o. And Richard Croke 
holds of the said honor 4 fees in Haselbury, Draycote, Walcote, 
Rodebume, Cockelbergh, Assheley, and Fouleswyk, in the said 
county, which are worth per annum, clear, £\o. 

[According to the calendar. Maiden Winterborne, Bridton, 
Cumpton, Sholham, Burewefeldfahd Careswell are also mentioned, 
but the document is quite illegible in places.] 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward I, No. 44 (52). 



E 



cEDmunD Catl of CorntoalL 

XtCnt of the manor of Sceles and of 20 librates of rent 
in Wyntereslawe made at Devizes before Peter Malore and 
Richard de Chriseldene on Monday in the feast of St. Hilary, 
32 Edward I [1304], by the oath of Thomas de Gomeldene, Richard 
de la Chambre, Walter de Thathum, John de Cane/ord, Henry Hayras, 
John Proute, John Hulon, Stephen Tot, John de Lucy, Hugh le Yonge, 
Robert le Frankelayn, William Noble, 12 jurors of the neighbourhood 
of Wintereslawe, and of Guy Stortone, Walter de Horsintone, John de 
Immere, Eustace de Borton, John Tony, Robert de la Leygh, Edward 
Loddok, William Atteschaen, Robert Atteschaen, Roger Dencok, John 
Palmere, Walter Pynnok, 12 jurors of Seles. And the said jurors of 
Wynterslawe say that 

Robert de Clifford, and John de Cromewelle and Dionisia his wife, 
held the said manor of Wynterslawe in pourparty, as of the right 
of the said Robert and Dionisia, of Edmund Earl of Cornwall by 
the service of ;^2o per annum, only for all service, which said rent 
the said Earl gave to John de Benstede as dry-rent. And there is 
no other profit. 

And the jurors of Sceles say that there is there a certain capital 
messuage with a grange, ox-house, and garden, and it is worth 
per annum 6^. 8^. And a certain mill with a pool, which are 
worth per annum 14^. %d. Sum of the messuages and mills, xis. \d. 
There are there 150 acres of arable land, each acre whereof is 
worth per annum 6^.: sum 75J. Also 16 acres of meadow, each 
acre whereof is worth per annum zod. : sum 26J. 8^. Also 42 acres 
of pasture, each acre whereof is worth per annum 4</. And 20 acres 
of several pasture, each acre whereof is worth per annum Zd. : 
sum of all the pasture zjs. j\.d. There is there a certain pastiA-e 
called Brome, and the profit thereupon is worth per annum i6j. 
Also a certain pasture for agisting sheep in common, which is 



276 Wiltshire 

worth per annum 1 3^. 4^. There are there 62 acres of wood, and 
the profit of the underwood is worth per annum zos. There is there 
a quarry of millstones, and the profit by the year is 3^ . The pleas 
and perquisites of the Court are worth per annum 3^. ^. There 
are there 7 villeins, each of whom holds one messuage and half 
a virgate of land, and pays per annum 14J. in all: sum £\ i%s. 
Also 2 villeins, each of whom pays per annum 4J. : sum 8j. And 
10 villeins, each of whom holds one messuage and one ferlingate 
of land, and pays per annum 8j. %d. : sum £\ 6s. Sd. Also 4 cottars, 
each of whom holds one cottage and one acre of land at will, and 
pays per annum zs. ^d. : sum gj. 8c/. There is there one tenant 
who holds one messuage and one croft at will, and pays per annum 
5J. There are there 3 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage 
and one curtilage, and pays per annum i6d.: sum 4^. And one 
tenant who holds half an acre of land at will, and pays per annum 
4//. And another tenant who holds one ditch, and pays per 
annum 4^. And be it known that of each of the said tenants 
having 40 sheep the lord shall take by the year 2 sheep of custom, 
and that custom is worth per annum zod. And of each tenant 
having one pig over one year old the lord shall take id. per annum 
for grashanese, and also having one pig of half a year he takes 
per annum \d., and it is worth per annum is. 

Sum of the sums of the extent of Seles ;^22 iis. Sd., of the 
which there is owing to the heirs of William de Gouiz per annum 
i2</., and to the Church of St. Michael of Mere dd., whereof the 
third part of the moiety is ']^s. ^id. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 28 Edward 1, No. 44 (60). 



fmx% Wit of giol^n De iHetiet 

■^ • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn made at Marlebergh before the escheator 
X 19th February, 29 Edward I [1301], to ascertain if John 
de Meriet and Mary his wife had any issue between them, whereby 
the said John ought to hold the lands and tenements which were 
of the inheritance of Mary his wife by the liberty of England 
or not, by the oath oi John de Berewyk, Roger de Stotescumbe, Walter 
le Blak, Adam Barbost, Nicholas de Escote, Peter de Poltone, Reginald 
Waz, Walter Jonkyn, Henry de Okebume, William Crespyn, Henry 
de Berewyk, Roger Styne, Roger de Thorhulle, John son o^ John, Roger 
de Estrop, Henry Sturmy, William Lylebon, and Richard Gervays, who 
say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 277 

The said John and Mary his wife had issue female living, with all 
her members in order, who, her living voice being heard, reqeived 
baptism and was called Joan, by reason of which issue the said 
John ought to hold the said lands and tenements by the liberty of 
England. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.j 29 Edward I, No. 6. 



I 



^tmon He Cumbe. 

nCj[UlSltlOn made at Ambresbyre before the escheator 
4th December, 29 Edward I [1300], of the lands and 
tenements which were of Simon de Combe, by the oath of Edmund 
Cormaylles, Roger de Stintescombe, William Warde, Thomas le Dresceour, 
John Mandeware, William atte Dene, Richard atte Hull, Geoffrey le 
Erye, John Michel, Robert le Frankeleyn, Peter le Chambrelayn^ and 
William le Beyshine, who say that 

The said Simon de Combe held on the day that he died 2 carucates 
of land in Fiteleton of the King in chief by fee farm, paying 
therefor yearly at the King's Exchequer ;^i 2, to wit, at Michaelmas 
and Easter by equal portions, and they are worth nothing beyond 
the said farm. He also held 2 carucates of land in the said 
vill of the Prior of Newmarket by fee farm, paying by the year 
ii\ marks. 

The capital messuage with the garden is worth per annum 6s. Sd. 
There are there 200 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 
66s. Sd., price of the acre ^d. Also 3 acres of meadow, which are 
worth per annum gs., price of the acre 3^. There is there a several 
pasture which is worth per annum 45^. Also a common pasture, 
which is worth per annum lod. There are there 2 parts of one 
mill, which are worth per annum 1 3^. 4</. : sum £j zs. ^d. There 
are there 2 free tenants, who pay per annum 10s. bd., to wit, 
at Michaelmas, Christmas, Easter, and Midsummer, by equal 
portions. Also 5 customars, who pay altogether per annum ^os. 
at the said 4 terms : sum of the free tenants and customars bos. 6d. 
The perquisites of the Court are worth per annum 3 j. Sum-total, 
£10 IS. lod. 

He also held certain lands and tenements in the ville of Combe 
of the Bishop of Winchester by the service of the third part of one 
knight's fee. There are there 100 acres of land, which are worth 
per annum 33^. ^.d., price of the acre 4(f. There is there a several 
pasture, which is worth per annum 1 6s. Sum, 49^. 4^. 
1 S • 



278 Wiltshire 

There are there 3 customars, who pay altogether by the year 
1 3J. 4//. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions, and 
each of the said customars pays 3 hens and one cock at the feast 
of St. Martin, price of th? hen id. Sum of the rent of the 
customars, 13^.4^. Sum of the hens, iid. Sum of the money, iid. 
Sum-total, 63J. %d. 

He also held 2 marks of yearly rent in the vill of Compton of the 
Earl of Leicester by the service of the seventh part of one knight's 
fee, to be taken at the feast of St. Michael. 

John de Combe, brother of the said Simon de Combe, is his next 
heir-apparent, and is of the age of 22 years, but the jurors say 
nevertheless that Alice, who was the wife of the said Simon de Combe^ 
is pregnant by him. 

Sum of the said extent £i\ i6j. zd., of the which in rent resolute 
to the Prior of Newmarket £^ 6j. %d., and there remains, clear, 
£b gs. bd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 14. 



aiice, tDl^o toagi tl^e txjife of ^imon De Combe* 

T • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn made before the escheator at Netheravene, 
X. 8th June, 29 Edward I [i 301], to ascertain li Alice, who was 
the wife of Simon de Combe, gave birth to a son or daughter by the 
said Simon, and if it is the next heir or not, by the oath of Edmond 
de Cormaylles, Richard de la Folic, John de Lyttelcote, John Lymbernere, 
William de la Dene, Richard atle Hulk, Adam Barbast, Gilbert de 
Stubynlon, Richard de Calstone, Hamond Virgile, Thomas Cosyn, and 
William le Frank, who say that 

The said Alice was delivered of a son by the said Simon of the 
name of Richard, and he is the next heir of the said Simon, and is 
aged 10 weeks. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 14. 



jljicl^olagf 'BorDen* 



I nqUlSltlOIl taken at Merlebergh before the escheator 
A 28th January, 29 Edward I [i 301], of the lands and tene- 
ments which were of Nicholas Borden in co. Wilts on the day that 
he died, by the oath oi John de Berewyk, Roger de Slotescombe, Thomas 



Inquisittones Post Mortem. 279 

de Polton, William Craspyn, Roger Page, Henry de Okebume, John 
Jokyn, William Graydyn, William Dodeford, William Emald, Robert 
Ab/rith, and Hugh de Baldeham, who say that 

The said Nicholas Bordon held 2 carucates of land in the vill of 
Yatesbury of the Earl of Lincoln by the service of half a knight's 
fee. The capital messuage with the easement of the houses is 
worth per annum zs. There are there 200 acres of arable land, 
which are worth per annum \its. %d., price of the acre 8^. Also 

3 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 6j., price of the 
acre zs. There is there a several pasture, which is worth per 
annum ts. Also another several pasture, which is worth per annum 
1 3^. \d. Sum, £1 4J. There is there one customar who holds one 
virgate of land, and pays per annum 4-r. at the 4 principal terms of 
the year. There are there 5 cottars, each of whom holds one 
cottage, and they pay per annum altogether ^s. sd. at the 4 principal 
terms of the year by equal portions. Sum, i $s. $d. Sum of the 
whole value of Yatesbury, ^j i-js. sd. 

He also held half a carucate of land in the vill of Paulesholte, 
in the said county, of the Earl of Arundel by the service of one 
knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the easement of the house and the 
garden adjoining is worth per annum 45-. There are there 44 acres 
of arable land, which are worth per annum 22^., price of the acre 
td. There is there a several pasture, which is worth per annum 
18^. Also another common pasture, which is worth per annum y. 
There is there the fourth part of one water-mill, which is worth 
per annum 3^. 4^^. Sum, ^y. lod. There are there 5 free tenants, 
of whom /ohn de Hornedon holds 7 acres of land, and pays per 
annum, viz., at Christmas, Easter, Midsummer, and Michaelmas, 
by equal portions. Adam de Paulesholte holds 2 acres of land, and 
pays per annum zs. at the said terms. John de Sandrig holds one 
croft, and pays per annum zs. at the said terms. Walter de Odyham 
holds one acre of land, and pays per annum id. at the feast of 
St. Michael. Walter Carnent holds one virgate of land, and pays 
per annum 8j. at the said terms. Sum of the rent of the free 
tenants, 17^. id. There are there 5 customars, of whom John 
Carnent holds one virgate of land, and pays per annum 8j. at the 

4 principal terms of the year, and 3 hens and one cock at the feast 
of St. Martin, price of the hen id. Simon Levesone holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays per annum 4^. at the said 4 terms, and 
3 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of the hen as 
above. Robert de Somerham holds half a virgate of land, and pays 
per annum 4?. at the said 4 terms, and 3 hens and i cock at the 



28o Wiltshire 

feast of St. Martin, price of the hen as above. Juliana Voxhangere 
holds one cottage, and pays per annum bd. at the said 4 terms. 
Eva la Herde holds one cottage, and pays per annum bd. at the 
said terms. Sum of the rents of the customars, 1 7 j. Sum of the 
hens, 12. Sum of the money, \zd. Sum of the value of Paule- 
sholte, t%s. lid. 

He also held one carucate of land in Henton of Henry de Cobeham 
in socage, paying i %d. at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle. 

The capital messuage with the easement of the houses, with 
a small close adjoining, is worth per annum 3J. There are there 
64 acres of land, which are worth per annum 32^., price of the 
acre bd. Also 4 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum bs., 
price of the acre i %d. There is there a common pasture, which is 
worth per annum 4?. bd. : sum 45^. There are there 3 free tenants, 
of whom Reginald Waz holds 2 acres of land, and pays per annum 
z^d. at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle, St. John the Baptist, 
and St. Michael, in equal portions, and at Easter i lb. of pepper, 
price lid. Philip de Gay holds 8 acres of land, and pays per 
annum ^d. at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle. Walter Jokyn 
holds one croft, and pays per annum izd. at the feasts of the 
Annunciation of Our Lady and St. John the Baptist : sum of the 
rent of the free tenants, 3^. 9^. There are there 8 cottars, each of 
whom holds one cottage with a curtilage, and they pay altogether 
14?. bd. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions, and 
they pay 1 1 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price 
of the hen as above. Sum of the rent of the cottars, 14^. bd. 
Sum of the hens, 16. Sum of the money, ibd. 

Sum of the whole value of Henton, 65 j. \d., whereof in rent 
resolute as above 18^., and there remains, clear, 63J. "jd. 

He also held half a carucate of land in La Litleton oi Henry 
de Cobeham in socage, and pays per annum 4^. at the feasts of the 
Annunciation of Our Lady and St. Giles by equal portions. The 
capital messuage with a garden is worth per annum bs. There are 
there 40 acres of land, which are worth per annum 13^. ^d., price of 
the acre 4*/. Also 6 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 
9^ ., price of the acre i %d. 

Sum, clear, besides the rent resolute, 24?. 4^/. 

Sum of the whole value of Yatesbury, £•] ijs. $d.; Paulesholte, 
bSs. lid. ; Henton, b$s. jd.; Litelton, 24r. 4<f. 

Sum of the sums, £ib 14^. ^d. 

The said Nicholas also held in co. Devon the manor of 
Kingesteynton of the King in chief by the service of one knight's 
fee, which said manor was assigned to Marie, who was the wife of 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 281 

Robert Borden in dower, and she still holds it. The said manor is 
worth per annum, clear, £q. 

Nicholas, son of the said Nicholas Borden, is his next heir, and is 

aged 1 1 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i() Edward I, No. 26. 



iHattlDa tie TBello Campo, CountejSiS of 
2HartD(c6» 

I nqUlSltlOn made before the escheator at Chiriel, 1 8th May, 
A. 29th Edward I [1301], of the lands and tenements which 
were of Matilda de Bello Campo, formerly Countess of Warwick, on 
the day that she died, by the oath of Adam Chamherlayn, Gilbert 
Fynamour, Walter Brudesyert, William Asser, William de . . aseward, 
Robert de Barevyle, Walter Reymond, Robert le Schetere, Richard atte 
Forde, William Coych, John Avenel, and Walter Thomas, who say that 

The said Matilda held the manor of Chiriel, in co. Wilts, of the 
King in chief by the service of one knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the easement of the houses is worth 
per annum izd. There are there 100 acres of arable land by the 
lesser hundred, which are worth per annum 50^., price of the acre 
bd. Also 12 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum izs., 
price of the acre iid. There is there a certain several pasture, 
which is worth per annum ^s. Also another several pasture, which 
is worth per annum 25^. There is there one water-mill, which is 
worth per annum ly. \d. Sum, 1045^. ^d. There are there 3 free 
tenants, of whom one holds one virgate of land, and pays per 
annum 20s., to wit, at the feasts of St. Andrew the Apostle, the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist, and St. Michael, by equal portions, and i lb. of pepper 
at the feast of All Saints, price izd. And 2 of the said free tenants 
hold 2 virgates of land, and each of them pays i lb. of cummin at 
the feast of St. Michael, price of the lb. \d. Sum of the rent of 
the free tenants, zis. zd. 

There are there 14 customars, each of whom holds one virgate 
of land, and pays per annum loj. at the feasts of St. Andrew, the 
Annunciation, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and St. Michael 
by equal portions. There are there 6 customars, each of whom 
holds half a virgate of land, and pays per annum is. at the said 
terms, and 3 hens and one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of 
each one \d. There are there 12 cottars, each of whom holds one 



282 Wiltshire 

cottage, and pays per annum 3J. at the said tenns, and 3 hens and 
one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price as above. And each of 
the said customars and cottars shall work for 3 days in Autumn, 
and the day's work is worth id. There are there 2 cottars, each of 
whom holds one cottage, and pays per annum i8</. at the said 
4 terms. Sum of the rent of the customars and cottars, ;^io gs. 
Sum of the works, 2>s. Sum of the hens, 72. Sum of the money, 
6s. The perquisites of the Court are worth per annum 3^. 

Sum of the whole value, £1-] iis. bd. 

Guy de Bello Campo, son of the said Matilda, is her next heir, 
and is aged 30 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.y 29 Edward I, No. 33. 



Laurence De 'Bluntejsnon* 

T • • • 

I nC^lllSltlOri made before the escheator at Bradenestoke, 
JL ist May, 29 Edward I [1301], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Laurence de Bluntesdon on the day that he died, 
by the oath of Adam Walrond, John Ace, Richard Aylmeir, Robert 
de Lusteshulle, Walran son of Peter, Brian Roberd, Hugh Brian^ 
John le Palmere, James Sprot, James le Blake, John Nout, and Roger 
Bussup, who say that 

The said Laurence de Bluntesdon held one virgate of land in 
Bluntesdon of the King in chief, belonging to the manor of 
Sevenhampton, which is now in the hands of the King, paying 
by the year i zd. at the feast of St. Michael, and doing suit at Court 
from 3 weeks to 3 weeks- And the said virgate of land contains 
20 acres, which are worth per annum ts. 8d., price of the acre 4^/. 

The said Laurence held one carucate of land of Eulk son of 
Warin, by the service of half a knight's fee. The capital messuage 
with the garden is worth per annum zs. There are there 80 acres 
of arable land, which are worth per annum 20s., price of the 
acre ^d. Also 4 acres of several pasture, which are worth per 
annum zs. 8d., price of the acre 8^. : sum 24^. Sd. There are there 
2 cottars, and each of them pays per annum zs., viz., at Christmas, 
Easter, Midsummer, and Michaelmas, by equal portions. Sum of 
the rent of the cottars, 4^. 

The said Laurence held one carucate of land in Bluntesdon of 
John Golajre by the service of the fifth part of one knight's fee. 
There are there 40 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 
loj., price of the acre ^d. Also 2 acres of meadow, which are 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 283 

worth per annum zs., price of the acre \zd. : sum 12^. There are 
there 3 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate of land, 
and pays per annum \zd. at the said 4 feasts. There is there 
one customar who holds 6 acres of land, and pays per annum 
2J. at the said terms. And each of the said 3 customars shall work 
from the feast of St. John the Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael 
for 40 days, and the day's work is worth \d. Sum of the rent 
of the customars, 5J. Sum of the works, is. There are there 
4 cottars, who pay per annum in the whole 4^. at the said terms. 
Sum of the rent of the cottars, 4^. 

Sum of the whole value, 6iJ. \d., whereof there are owing to the 
King as above \id., and so the extent is, clear, 605. \d. 

Joan, daughter of the said Laurence, is his next heir, and is aged 
9 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 37. 



"W" • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made before the escheator at Combe^ 

J. 22nd October, 29 Edward I [1301], of the lands and 
tenements which were of Hugh de Plessetis, in co. Wilts, on the 
day that he died, by the oath of John Martyn, Robert Gereberd, 
Thomas le Chamberlayn, Thomas le Ryde, Henry le Frye, John 
Stuberd, Richard le Yonge, John le Couke, John atte More^ John the 
Smith, John Sturmy, and Geoffrey le Ceu, who say that 

Hugh de Plessetis held the moiety of the vill of Combe of the 
King in chief by the service of the fourth part of one knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the close adjacent and the easement 
of the houses is worth per annum is. There are there 1 20 acres of 
arable land, which are worth per annum 30^., price of the acre ^d. 
Also 7 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum i4r., price of 
the acre 2s. There is there the moiety of one mill, which is worth 
per annum ts, 8d. : sum 52J. 8d. There are there 8 free tenants, of 
whom Henry le Frye holds 3 virgates of land, and pays per annum 
lid. at the feast of St. Michael. Thomas le Ryde holds one virgate 
of land, and pays per annum bs. Sd., viz., at Christmas, Easter, 
Midsummer, and Michaelmas, by equal portions. Alice, the relict 
of — Cook, holds 8 acres of land, and pays per annum 6s. at the 
said terms. John Sturmy holds one virgate of land, and pays 
per annum 1 2s. at the said terms. John le Flynt holds 2 virgates of 
land, and pays per annum \zs. at the said terms, and 6 darts at 



284 Wiltshire 

Michaelmas, price id. John Faber holds one messuage and one 
acre of land, and pays per annum ^s, at the said terms. John le Keu 
holds one messuage and z acres of land, and pays per annum 5^. 8</. 
at the said terms. Matilda Dalrich holds one messuage, and pays 
per annum 4J. at the said terms : sum of the rent of the free tenants 
50J. id. There are there 13 customars, each of whom holds one 
virgate of land, and pays per annum ts. at the said terms. And 
each of the said customars shall work for 36 days between the 
feast of St. Peter which is called Advincula and the feast of 
St. Michael, and the day's work is worth \d. There are also there 
2 customars, and each of them holds half a virgate of land, and 
pays per annum 4^. ifd. at the said terms, and each of them shall 
work for 1 8 days in the Autumn, and the day's work is worth \d. 
There are there 2 customars, and each of them holds 2 acres of 
land, and pays per annum i^d. at the said terms, and 3 hens and 
one cock at the feast of St. Martin, price of each \d., and each 
of them shall work for 18 days in the Autumn, and the day's work 
is worth \d. Sum of the rent of the customars, £\ gs. 2d. Sum of 
the works, 22s. 6d. Sum of the hens, 8. Sum of the money, 8d. 
There are there 4 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and 
pays per annum zs. at the said terms : sum of the rent of the 
cottars Ss. The perquisites of the Court are worth per annum zs. 

Sum of the whole value, ;^ii 5^. $d. 

Hugh, son of the said Hugh, is his next heir, and is aged 
6 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 54. 



Cl^e J^nore00 ann jl5un0 of ambresibur^* 

InCJUlSltlOn made at Wynterburnestoke of the lands and 
tenements which were of William Bakun in the vill of 
Bereford, and of one mark of rent oi John de Littelecote, on Sunday 
next after the Invention of Holy Cross, 29 Edward I [1301], by the 
oath of Simon de Monte Alto, Alan de Lange/ord, William de Ralveston, 
Robert Bide, Nicholas de Wyly, Robert le Savage, John le Crokkere, 
William Wyppe, Richard Peytevyn, Adam Berthelot, John Buret, 
Hugh Sy reman, Robert le Frenshe, and Ralph de la Sale, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to the Prioress and Nuns of Ambresbiry one 
messuage, 36 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow, and pasture for 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 285 

100 sheep, which they had of the feoffment of William Bakun in 
the vill of Bereford for ever, because the said tenements are held 
of the said Prioress in chief by the service of bs. per annum, doing^ 
also suit at 2 " Laghedayes " per annum, and all other services to 
the said Prioress and to no other, saving nevertheless juries, 
assizes, recognizances and inquisitions, with which that tenement 
was wont to be charged, and it is worth per annum in all things 
besides the said rent ds. %d. 

He has tenements and lands whereby he may sufficiently do the 
services in assizes and juries, as is abovesaid, so that the country 
may not be wronged or charged. 

The said Prioress has of the gift and grant of William de Estdene 
one mark of rent yearly of one messuage and 2 virgates of land, 
which John de Littelecoie holds in Combe and Littelecote, and 
likewise of one meadow which the said John holds in the parish 
of Eneford, and that meadow is called Northmede, for the soul of 
Lady A. Queen of England, mother of the now King. The said 
messuage, 2 virgates of land, and the meadow are not charged 
with any other service towards anyone. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 90. 



Cl^e Tiret^ren anD ^imi^ of tl^e i^o^pital of 
^t. d^tlejs of melton* 

"W • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn made before the escheator at Wylton on 
A Thursday in the Morrow of St. Peter in Cathedra, 
29 Edward I [1301], by the oath of Peter Beleiambe, Robert Beede, 
Hugh Coterel, Hugh Syreman, Richard Maddok, Robert Maddok, 
Laurence Coleman, John le Mans, William le Escriveyn, Thomas le 
Proute, John Wolverich, and Nicholas Ragenel, whether the brethren 
and sisters of the Hospital of St. Giles of Wylton were wont to take 
6 marks of the borough of Wylton for the support of a certain 
chaplain celebrating divine service in the said hospital every day, 
or not, who say that 

The said brethren and sisters of the said hospital had and took 
of the gift and grant of the progenitors of King Edward who now 
is 6 marks of yearly rent of the vill of Wylton, but they do not 
know who was the first donor, because so much time has elapsed 
that there is no memory of it, and the brethren and sisters who 
are there now have no title of the said gift, but they believe 
that King Henry the Old first assigned and gave the said 6 marks 



286 Wiltshire 

to be paid to the said Hospital. The reason of the gift of those 
6 marks was for the support of one chaplain whom the said 
brethren and sisters ought to find and do find, celebrating every 
day in the said hospital for the soul of the said King, his 
progenitors, and his heirs. The said brethren and sisters took 
the said 6 marks from the first gift made to them of certain rents 
and issues of the said vill of Wylton by the hands of the bailiffs of 
the said vill at the 4 principal terms of the year, to wit, at each 
term zos., as well in the time when the said vill was in the hands 
of the progenitors of the now King as in the time when it was 
in the hands of the lord Richard, formerly King of Germany^ 
and of the lord Edmund, formerly Earl of Cornwall, without any 
interruption of time up to the feast of the Nativity of the Lord last 
past, when the said vill came to the hands of the now King by the 
death of the said Earl of Cornwall. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 102. 



^^ • • • 

I riC[lllSltlOn made at Grafton on Wednesday next after 
L the feast of St. Dionisius, 30 Edward I [1302], he^ore John 
de Herierigge, sheriff of Wilts, by the oath of Henry Lesturmi, Roger 
de Harden, Philip Lesturmi, William Warin, Robert le Droys, John de 
Kepehull, William Hoppegresse, Geoffrey Sauvage, John Fraunkelayn, 
Eustace Sauvage, Robert Deverle, Thomas Bonkelene, Thomas de Hurle, 
John de Fostehury, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or of others if 
the King should grant to John de Haveringge that he may give and 
assign to a certain chaplain celebrating divine service every day in 
the chapel of the Blessed Mary of Est Grafton, one virgate of land 
and 4 marks of rent in Walton and West Grafton, to hold to the 
said chaplain and his successors celebrating divine service every 
day in the said chapel for ever. The said virgate of land is held 
of the Earl of Gloucester by knight's service, to wit, by the service 
of dd. when 40J. are taken of scutage \de scuto\ and it is worth 
per annum, clear, ts. %d. The tenement from the which the said 
4 marks of rent come is held of Henry Lesturmi by the service of 
1 OS. per annum. The lands and tenements remaining to the said 
John de Haveringge, besides the said gift and assignment, are worth 
per annum ;^3o, which said lands and tenements suffice for the 
customs and services duly to be made, as well for the said land and 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 287 

rent given as for those retained, and for other charges which he 
sustained and was wont to sustain, as in suits, views of frank- 
pledge, aids, tallages, vigils, fines, redemptions, amercements, 
contributions, and other charges whatsoever emerging to be 
sustained. And that the said John may be put on assizes, juries, 
and recognizances whatsoever, as he was wont to be put before the 
said gift and assignment, so that the country by the said gift by 
default of the said John may not be charged or wronged with 
a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 29 Edward I, No. 113. 



iRicl^arD De 2B(lton» 

Inquisition made at Wylton before/, de Neuburgh, sheriff 
of Wilts, on Monday next after Easter Day, 29 Edward I 
[1301], by the oath o{ Edmund Falk, Robert Bede, Hugh Sireman, 
Robert atte Cruch, Stephen atte Dene, William Lamberd, Walter 
Gileberd, Robert le Savage, Robert Faber, Richard atte More, John 
Stubard, and John Tesson, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to Richard de Wyltone that he may give and assign 
one messuage, 3 virgates of land in West Harnham, to Stephen de 
Rammesbury, Warden of the House of Valle Scolar', of New Sarum, 
to hold to the said Warden and his successors for ever. The said 
messuage and land are held of the Abbess and Convent of Tarante 
by the service of half a pound of wax only, to be paid yearly at the 
altar of the Blessed Michael of Tarente, and they are worth per 
annum, clear, i%s. 

The said Richard has at Wylton, in co. Wilts, divers lands, and 
tenements, and rents, and at Nutford, in co. Dorset, one messuage 
and one carucate of land, which remain to the said Richard beyond 
the said gift and assignment, which sufiice for the customs and 
services duly to be done, as well for the said messuage and lands 
given as for the other lands and tenements retained, and for all 
other charges which he sustained and was wont to sustain, as in 
suits, views of frankpledge, aids, tallages, vigils, fines, redemptions, 
amercements, contributions, and other charges whatsoever. The 
said Richard may be put on assizes, juries, and other recognizances 
whatsoever, as he was wont to be put before the said gift and 
assignment, so that the country by the said gift by default of the 
said Richard may not be wronged by a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 30 Edward I, No. 126. 



288 Wiltshire 



Bicl^arD cFarl of arunueL 

-^P • • • 

j nC[UlSltlOn made before the escheator at Kynele the last 
X day of June, 30 Edward I [1302], of the lands and tenements 
which were oi Richard Earl of Arundel on the day that he died, by 
the oath of William de Testewode, John Burel, Thomas the Clerk, 
Roger the Clerk, Peter de Holkynton, John Wyger, John de Aldrynton, 
Roger le Saucer, William le Palmer, John Enhoke, John de . . ortfolk, 
and ..../(? Theyn, who say that 

The said Richard Earl of Arundel held in chief the manor of 
Kynele of the King by the service of one knight keeping the Castle 
of Devizes in time of war, and for the said service he gave every 
year at the feast of St. Michael 20J. at the said castle. 

The capital messuage with the close adjacent, and certain ease- 
ments of the houses, are worth per annum \zs. i^. There are 
there in the demesne 400 acres of arable land, which are worth 
per annum £,t 13^. \d., price of the acre \d. Also 40 acres of 
meadow, which are worth per annum t^s., price of the acre 18^. 
There is a certain several pasture, and it is worth per annum 25^. 
The pasture of Westwode is worth per annum \os. The pleas and 
perquisites are worth per annum 40J. The commodity of the wood 
with the pannage is worth per annum half a mark. Sum, £,\if %s. \d. 
There are there 4 free tenants, of whom John de Paulesholte holds 
one knight's fee in Paulesholte, for the which he holds relief, 
scutage, and suit from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. Nicholas Berdon holds 
half a knight's fee, for the which he owes homage, relief, scutage, 
and suit like the said John. William Musard holds half a knight's 
fee, and owes relief and scutage as above. John de Guschyan holds 
3 parts ... for the which he owes homage, relief, scutage, 
and suit as above. John A'a>'«f/ holds one knight's fee, for the which 
he owes in all things like the said John de Paulesholte. Simon 
. . . holds in Badmynton one knight's fee, for the which he 
owes in all things like the sdt.\d John. Richard de la Rivere holds 
one knight's fee in Actone Torborvyle, in co. Gloucester, for the 
which he owes in all things like the saidyi?^«. 

There are there 7 other free tenants, of whom John Wyger 
holds half a virgate of land, and pays per annum \zd. at the 
2 terms of the year, to wit, at the feasts of St. Michael and the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary. The said John owes by 
the year xid. for the head of one pool, to be paid at the said 
terms. William le Sherreve holds half a virgate of land, and owes 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 289 

in all things like the said John . . . rent. /oAn le Fraunkelayn 
holds one virgate of land, and pays per annum 5^. at the said 
terms. John Burel holds 2 crofts, and pays per annum 7^. at the 
said terms. Thomas . . . holds the third part of one virgate 
of land and one croft, and pays per annum gj. William, son of 
Thomas de Gayford^ holds half an acre of land and one rood, and 
pays per annum izd. Sum of the rents of the free tenants, 23J. 

There are there 3 customars, each of whom holds one virgate 
of land, and pays per annum \os., and each of them ought to 
mow for 12 days, and the day's work is worth \d., and he ought 
to weed for 2 days, and the day's work is worth \d., and he 
ought to mow between the feast of St. Peter which is called 
ad Vincula and the feast of St. Michael 8^ acres of all kinds of 
corn, and the reaping of each acre is worth z\d., and he ought to 
carry the hay for 3 days, and the day's work is worth r\d., and he 
ought to carry the corn for 4 days, and the day's work is worth zd. 
There are there 25 other customars, each of whom holds one half- 
virgate of arable land, and pays per annum ^s. at the said terms, 
and each of them shall work in all things for the moiety like a 
customar of the said virgates. There are there 13 villeins, each of 
whom holds the third part of one virgate of land, and pays per 
annum \od. at the said terms, and he ought to weed for one day, 
and the day's work is worth \d., and he ought to mow for 4 days, 
and the day's work is worth \d., and he ought to reap 3 acres, and 
the reaping of one acre is worth z\d., and to carry the hay for one 
day, and the day's work is worth i\d., and to carry the corn of the 
lord for one day and a half, and the day's work is worth zd. Sum 
of the rents of the customars, £() i8j. \d. Sum of the works, 
£if. 2s. ^^d. And all the said customars shall give to the lord in 
common s^s. ^d. for his larder in the feast of St. Martin. There 
are there 7 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage and pays per 
annum zs. at the said terms, and 3 hens and one cock at the feast 
of St. Martin, price of the hen id., price of the cock \d. Sum of 
the rents of the cottars, 14J. Sum of the hens, 21. Sum of the 
money, zid. Sum of the cocks, 7. Sum of the money, ^^d. Sum 
of the sums, ;^33 2^^. \\d. 

Edmund de Arondel is the son and heir of the said Richard, some- 
time Earl o{ Arondell, and is aged 18 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m.y 30 Edward I, No. 30. 



WILTS INQ. — VOL.11. I 9 

2(i 



290 Wiltshire 



€>ot)fre^ 'Btgil^op of morce^ter. 

Inquisition made before the escheator at Wylton, 
20th March, 30 Edward I [1302], of the lands and 
tenements which were of Godfrey Bishop of Worcester in 
CO. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath of Thomas de 
Babynton, John Strugg, Philip le Cok, John de Depeford, Walter 
Sc helling, Arnold Dagwolft^ Walter Faukoner, Walter Coleman, John 
Adam, Robert Vigerus, Elias de Molendino, and Roger Strug, who 
say that 

The said Godfrey held in his demesne as of fee the manor of 
Boyton of John Giffard, being within age and in the wardship 
of the King, by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the close adjoining and the easements 
of the houses is worth per annum one mark. There is there one 
water-mill, and it is worth per annum izs. There are there 
200 acres of arable land, each acre whereof is worth per annum 
ifd. : sum, bbs. Sd. Also 10 acres of meadow, each whereof is worth 
per annum iid.: sum, 10s. 

There are in Cortynton adjoining the said manor 10 customars, 
each of whom holds one virgate of land, and they pay altogether 
per annum £■] iSs. i^d. at the 4 terms of the year, viz., at the feasts 
of St. Michael, St. Andrew, the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, 
and St. John the Baptist, by equal portions. 

There are at Boyton 4 customars, each of whom holds half 
a virgate of land, and they pay per annum altogether 20s. at the 
said terms. Sum of the rent of the customars, £S i8j. i^d. 

There are also at Boyton 20 cottars, each of whom holds one 
cottage, and pays per annum iSd. at the said terms. Sum, 30J. 

The pasture there is worth per annum half a mark. 

There are there 100 acres of wood, and it is common, and is 
worth per annum as in herbage and underwood 6i'. Sd. 

Sum of the whole value, ;£i6 3J. ^^d. 

John Gifford, son of William Giffard, brother of the said Godfrey, 
is his next heir, and is aged 30 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 30 Edward /, No. 41. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 291 



31o]^n tie i^ampjsteDe. 

I nCJUlSltlOn made before the escheator at Mere, 8th 
X January, 31 Edward I [1303], of the lands and tenements 
which were of John de Hamsiede in co. Wilts on the day that he 
died, by the oath of Roger Wikyng, Walter de Horsington, Eustace 
de Borthon, Eudo de Storton, John Hodel, Robert de la Legh, John de 
Pimperlegh, William de la Sathe, Robert de la Saghe, William Vling, 
Walter Pinnok, and Roger Dyncok, who say that 

The sdi\di John de Ham.slede held in chief of the King 15 acres of 
arable land in socage by the service of 2j. and i lb. of pepper, 
price 8df., and they are worth per annum 5^., price of the acre \d. 

There are there [Mere] 2 acres of meadow, which are worth per 
annum 2o</., price of the acre \od. 

The said John held the capital messuage with the curtilage and 
garden and with one small meadow of John de Seles and Eustace de 
Borton, paying to them by the year, to wit, to the said John de Seles 
a chaplet of roses \capellu. rosarum'] in the feast of the Nativity 
of St. John the Baptist, and to the said Eustace de Borthon one pair 
of gloves in the feast of St. Michael. The said messuage with the 
easements of the houses is worth per annum 2J. : sum, %s. 8d. 

There are there 4 free tenants, of whom Roger Wykyng holds one 
messuage and one garden, and pays per annum i lb. of cummin at 
the feast of St. Michael, price \d. ; William Wyking holds one 
messuage with a curtilage, and pays per annum zs. at the 4 terms, 
viz., at the Nativity of the Lord 6d., at Easter td., at the Nativity 
of St. John the Baptist 6d., and at the feast of St. Michael td. ; 
Bartholomew le Mercer holds one messuage, and pays per annum 35. 
at the said terms by equal portions ; Cristia Davy holds one 
messuage and one curtilage, and pays per annum 3c/. at the said 
terms. Sum of the rent of the free tenants, 5^. 4!^/. 

There are there 5 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and 
pays per annum iid. at the said terms by equal portions. Sum of 
the rent of the cottars, is. 

Sum of the whole value, 19J. o\d. 

The said John de Hamsiede was a bastard, and had no heir of his 
body lawfully begotten. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 30 Edward I, No. 46. 



292 Wiltshire 

ant) Cji^ejc. 

Humphrey de Bchun, Earl of Hereford and ^jji?jr and Constable 
of England, to ail and singular his tenants in cos. Wilts and 
Gloucester, greeting. 

Whereas we have granted, delivered, remised, and altogether 
quitclaimed for us and our heirs to our magnificent prince and lord 
the lord Edward, by the grace of God the illustrious King of 
England, all the castles, vills, manors, lands, and tenements which 
we had and held in fee in England, as in our writing thereof made 
to our said lord more fully it is contained : we command you that 
from henceforth you be answerable to the said King as your lord in 
all things. 

Given at Londoii 8th October, in the 30th year of our said lord 
the King [1302]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 30 Edward I, No. 58. 



i^umpl^re^ tie '^Boljun^ Carl of l^ereforD 

ann Cjsjsejr* 

Extent of the lands and tenements which were oi Humphrey 
de Bohun, formerly Earl of Hereford, according to the 
extents thereof made and returned into the Chancery, to wit, 
the manor of Wockeseye with appurtenances in co. Wilts, which is 
extended per annum at ;^33 7J. 3^. 

Seisin of the manor of Wokkeseye was delivered to fohn de 
Borham, clerk, and Nicholas de Ahbyndon, sub-escheator of the King 
in CO. Wilts, by Brother yo/z«, Prior of Lantony next Gloucester, by 
the mandate of the Earl of Hereford on the day of St. Luke the 
Evangelist, 30 Edward I [1302]. 

Free Tenants. 

Geoffrey Davy, Walter de Baihon\ Ralph de London\ Robert de 
Pustich, Robert Porter, Gregory Est, Thomas le Clerk, Margery de 
Frome, Alice Note. Michael de Stoke did not come, nor was he 
summoned. Thomas Engleys was not summoned. Matilda Seman 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 293 

is impotent. Ralph Blakynger a perpetual invalid. William le 
Chapeleyn does not dwell in the country. 

Natives. 

Adam de Pustich, William Clochanger, Richard Johns, John Wygot, 
John Wygh (ill), Richard Bacon, Roger Stodhurd, John Bucke, Robert 
Reed, William Swerd, John Esthehalle {?), Alice Chant {}), John 
Swerd, John Curteys, John Crisp, William le Feure, Robert Gerveys, 
Jlenry Aylwyne, Robert atte Churche lanend, William Gibbes, John 
Brun, John atte Hok, William Theggar, William atte Wode, William 
Wynhome, Robert Byestethewode, Nicholas de Wyk (did not come), 
John B . . . thewode, Thomas Colur, Richard Sec . . . , Robert 
Dymmock (did not come), John Parys (?). 

The same natives did fealty and acknowledged the lord in 6^. %d. 



jBoger la marre* 

Inquisition taken hy John de Hertrugg, sheriff of Wilts, at 
Cherleton next Upavene, on Saturday next after the feast of 
St. Dunstan, 30 Edward I [1302], by the oath oi Hugh le Drueys, 
John Felipe, John Le Frend, Richard atte Water, John de Molend, 
Richard le Chaundeler, John de la Wodemull, James de Erie, John le 
WolJ, William le Carpenter, Nicholas de Cruk, and William le Eyr, 
who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King shall 
grant to Roger la Warre that he may give his manor of Rustesal, 
which he holds of the King in chief, to Roger de Stocke and Alice 
his wife: to hold to the said Roger and Alice of the King and his 
heirs for the whole life of the said Roger and- Alice by the services 
therefore due and accustomed. 

The said manor is held of the King in chief by the service of 
one knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, £20. 

No lands or tenements remain to the said Roger besides the said 
gift and grant in co. Wilts, and the jurors do not know what lands 
and tenements he held of the King or others elsewhere. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 30 Edward I, File 38, No. 13 
\_Jormerly 30 Edward I, No. 79J. 

2 * 



294 Wilts kire 



l^enrt u 'BluntejSDon* 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at-Kyngbrigg he^oxQ John de Hertrugg, 
A sheriff of Wilts, on Thursday next after the feast of 
St. Dunstan, 30 Edward I [1302], by the oath of Simon Torney, 
knight, Richard Styve, of the same [_sic'], Richard le Berner, of the 
same, John Toky, Roger de Thornhull, Walter Maudut, Robert Russel, 
William de Dodde/ord, William Grandyn, John Bryan, Henry le Sauser, 
and Walter le Vonge, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to Henry de Bluntesdon that he may give one 
messuage and one virgate of land in Westtocham to the Prior and 
convent of Bradenestoke, to hold to them and their successors 
for ever. 

The said messuage and land are held of the said Prior and 
convent by the service of "^s. per annum, and they are worth per 
annum, clear, besides the said service 6s. 8d. 

The lands and tenements remaining to the said Henry de 
Bluntesdon, besides the said gift and assignment, suffice for the 
customs and services due to be done as well for the said messuage 
and land so given as for the other tenements retained by the said 
Henry, and for all the charges which he sustained and was wont 
to sustain. And that he may be put on all assizes, juries, and 
recognizances, as he was wont to be put before the said gift and 
assignment. And that the country by the default of the said 
Henry will net be charged with a large payment, 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 30 Edward I, File 38, No. 19. 



asobert De CUfforD* 

^r • • • 

I nOmSltlOn made at Clarindon before Hugh le Dapenser, 
X justice of the forest on this side the Trent, on Wednesday in 
the feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, 30 Edward I 
[1302], by the oath oi John de Vienna, chief forester of Clarindon, 
John de Puttone, Jordan de Laveresloke, and other foresters, Thomas 
de Gomeldon, Rohert de Haresjeud, Benedict de Galrogg, John aitemulle, 
Alan dt Langejord, and Robert Cole, verderers, and by the oath of 
Edmund Fate, William Hacche, John Hulon, John de Lucy, John 
Payn, John Don, Adam atte Roke, Nicholas de Holebury, Thomas 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 295 

Wale, John Domberdal, Andrew de Grimsted, and William le Noble, 
if it be to the damage of the King or to the hurt of the said forest 
or of any other if the King shall grant to Robert de Clifford that he 
may make a certain trench of the breadth of 160 feet of land about 
his wood of Wynterslowe which is within the metes of the said 
forest, and may cut down and sell his wood and tre'es there growing 
and turn them to his own advantage at his will, or not, etc. 

Who say that it is not to the damage of the King or to the hurt 
of the said forest or of any other if the King shall grant to Robert 
de Clifford that he may make a certain trench 1 60 feet broad about 
his wood at Wynterslowe, and may cut down and sell his wood and 
trees growing there, except that the harbouring of the wild beasts, 
if any shall come there, will be in so much deteriorated and 
decreased. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 30 Edward I, File 38, No. 21. 



JKobert le 'Brut auD otl^erjs* 

^F m • • 

I nC[lllSltlOn taken at Swyndon on Sunday next before 
X the feast of St. Margaret the Virgin, 30 Edward I [1302], 
before /ohn de Hertrugg, sheriff of Wilts, by the oath of Richard 
Styve, William de Dodeford, William Grandyn, Nicholas A tie Hull, 
Robert de Mordon, Robert de Mershton, Nicholas le Archer, Peter de 
Walcote, John de Hardington, Ralph de Aula, William de Bynnebury, 
and Hugh Sireman, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King shall 
grant to Robert le Brut, of Westtockenham, that he may give and 
assign to the Prior and convent of Bradenestoke 6 acres of land 
in Westtockenham, to hold to them and their successors for ever, 
because they say that the said 6 acres of land are held of the said 
Prior and convent in chief by the service of id. per annum, and 
are worth per annum, clear, \zd. 

Robert de la Hyde, of Lydierd, has no mill in Lydierd Milicent, 
but he has one messuage and 6 bovates of land there, which he 
holds of the said Prior and convent by knight's service, and by the 
service of 4^. per annum, which he may give and assign to the said 
Prior and convent without prejudice of the King or others, and 
they are worth per annum, clear, i mark. 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King shall 
grant to Thomas de Chuselden that he may give to the said Prior 



296 Wiltshire 

and convent one messuage and half a virgate of land in Chatyngton, 
because they say that the said messuage and land are held of the 
said Prior and convent by the service of ild. per annum, and are 
worth per annum, clear, 2s. 

Nor is it to the damage of the King or others if Nicholas Ingram 
shall give to the said Prior and convent one messuage and 2 virgates 
of land in Wynterburne Shireneton, to hold to them and their 
successors for ever, because they say that he holds the said 
messuage and land of the said Prior and convent by knight's 
service and los. per annum, and they are worth per annum, 
clear, los. 

fohn de Cerne, brother of Reginald Buret, holds a tenement in 
Langele, whereof i6j. rent is forthcoming, of the said Prior and 
convent, which without prejudice of the King and others he may 
assign to the said Prior and convent, to hold to them and their 
successors for ever. 

The lands and tenements remaining to the said Robert le Brut, 
Robert de la Hide, T/iomas de Chuselden, Nicholas Ingeram, and John 
de Cerne, besides the said gifts, suffice for the customs and services 
due to be done as well for the tenements given as for those re- 
tained, and all other charges which they sustained or were wont to 
sustain, as in suits, views of frankpledge, pledges, aids, tallages, 
vigils, fines and redemptions, amercements, contributions, and all 
other charges whatsoever to be sustained. And that the said Robert, 
Robert, Thomas, Nicholas, and John may be put on assizes, juries, 
and other recognizances, as before the said gifts was wont to be 
done ; and that the country, by the said assignment through the 
default of the said Robert, Robert, Thomas, Nicholas, and John, shall 
not be charged with a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 30 Edward I, File 39, No. 19. 



InOUlSltlOn made before the escheator at Staunton the 
last day of February, 31 Edward I [1303], of the lands and 
tenements which were of Herbert de St. Quintin in co. Wilts on the 
day that he died, by the oath of Walter de Ryson, Henry Vigorous, 
John Huberd, John Bluet, Reginald de Bradejeld, Reginald Royli, 
John de Clatford, Gilbert Fratinceys, William Blaunchard, Simon 
de Forde, Robert Lucas, William de Wotton, and John Harald, who 
say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 297 

Herbert de St. Quintin held the manor of Staurilon Quintin of the 
Earl of Gloucester by the service of one knight's fee. 

The capital messuage with the easements of the houses is worth 
per annum bs. There are there in the demesne 150 acres of arable 
land which are worth per annum 37J. 6</., price of the acre ^d. 
Also 15 acres of meadow which are worth per annum 25^., price of 
the acre zod. The profit of the wood with the pannage is worth 
per annum ijj. \d. Sum, £,1 \s. lod. 

There is there one free tenant who holds 4 virgates of land and 
pays per annum in the feast of St. Michael 8j. There are there 
1 1 customars, each of whom holds z virgates of land and pays 
per annum 15^. at 3 terms of the year, to wit, at the Nativity of the 
Lord T,s. ()d., at the feast of the Annunciation 3^. gd., at the feast of 
the Nativity of St. John the Baptist . ,s. lod. : sum, £8 $s. There 
are there 9 other customars, each of whom holds one virgate of 
land and pays per annum . ,s. 6d. at the said terms by equal 
portions : sum, 67^. 6d. Also 6 cottars, each of whom holds 
. . . and pays per annum zs. 6d. at the said terms: sum, 15J. 
The pleas and perquisites s. Sd. 

'Herbert de St. Quintin, son oi Herbert de St. Quintin^ is his next 
heir, and is aged 17 years. 

Chan, Inq. p.m., 31 Edward I ^ No. 28. 



-w- • • • 

I nnUlSltlOn made at Malmesbury before the escheator on 
X the I St day of the Ides of January, 31 Edward I [1303], as to 
what lands yo^^ Mauduyt held of the King in chief in demesne as 
of fee on the day that he died, and how much of others, etc., by 
the oath of Robert de Wichamthon, Richard de Remmesbury, Thomas 
de Weylonde, John de Ronde, Richard Weylond, Roger Boubb, William 
Paternoster, John le Pope, Walter Alurich, Walter Bridesherd, William 
Chal/herst, and Stephen Partrich, who say that 

John Mauduyt held of the King in chief on the day that he died 
the manor of Wyteleg by the service of one knight's fee as of 
the honor of Caresbrok being in the King's hand. There is there 
a certain messuage with a curtilage and garden adjoining, worth 
per annum 3^. \d. There are there 120 acres of arable land which 
are worth per annum 40J., price of the acre \d. Also 8 acres 
of meadow worth per annum izs., price of the acre \M. There is 



298 Wiltshire 

a pasture there which is worth per annum ts. Sd. There are there 

7 acres of wood, the profit whereof is worth per annum 3s. 6d., 
price of the acre 6d. : sum, 65^. bd. There are there 3 free tenants, 
of whom William le Escriveyn holds one messuage with a croft and 
pays per annum 3^. at 2 terms of the year, viz., at the feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin and the feast of St. Michael, by 
equal portions. Walter de Dene holds one messuage and pays per 
annum \zd. by equal portions at the said terms. John Schotard 
holds one messuage and 6 acres of arable land, and pays per annum 
y. ^^d. at the said terms. Sum of the free tenants, ys. j^d. There 
are there 9 customars, each of whom holds one messuage and 

8 acres of arable land, and shall work for 3 days in the week 
throughout the year, and the work of each day's work is worth id. : 
sum of the works, 58J. 6d. The said customars pay by the year 
at the feast of St. Martin each of them 3 hens and one cock for 
chersete : sum of the hens 27, price of the hen id. ; sum of the 
cocks 9, price of the cock ^d. : sum of the hens and cocks, 2s. -j^d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the Court with the heriots are worth 
per annum 6s. %d. : sum of the perquisites and heriots, bs. 8d. 

Sum-total, £j os. yd. 

John Mauduyt, nephew \nepos\ of John Mauduyt deceased, is his 
next heir, and is aged 2 1 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 31 Edward I ^ No. 38. 



"W • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn taken at Malmesbury, before the escheator, 
JL on the 2nd day of the Ides of January, 31 Edward I [1303], 
as to how much land John Maudut held of the King in chief in 
demesne as of fee on the day that he died, aifd how much of 
others, etc., etc., by the oath of John de Cumbe, Richard Perjet, 
Adam Wyberd, William Bayllemound, Henry Vigerous, Simon de Forde, 
John Bluet, Roger de Pekynghulle, Roger de Lupe, John le Trapper, 
Roger Roylly, and Robert Lucas, who say that 

John Maudut held of the Abbot of Malmesbury in Somerford 
Maudut the lands and tenements underwritten by the service of 
the third part of one knight's fee. 

There is there one messuage with a curtilage and garden 
adjoining, and it is worth per annum 45. There are there 140 
acres of arable land, and they are worth per annum 35J., price of 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 299 

the acre ^d. Also 12 acres of meadow, and they are worth per 
annum \%s.^ price of the acre 18^. There is there a pasture which 
is worth per annum 8^. There are there 10 acres of wood, the 
profit whereof is worth per annum 5 j,, price of the acre bd. There 
is there a water-mill, and it is worth per annum ^os. Sum, £\ \os. 
There are there 6 free tenants by inheritance, of whom John le 
Frye holds one messuage and 2 virgates of arable land, and pays 
per annum \\d.., to wit, at the feast of St. Andrew 4^. for hundred- 
silver, and at the feast of St. Michael \d., and he shall plough for 
one day in Summer for grasshearth, and the work is worth zd., and 
he owes suit at Court from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. Thomas le Theyn 
holds one messuage and 2 virgates of arable land, and pays there 
for per annum 3J. bd. and i lb. of pepper, price i2</., viz., at the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 2i</., at the feast of St. Giles 

1 lb. of pepper, and at the feast of St. Michael z\d., and he shall 
plough for one day in Summer for grasshearth, and the work is 
worth zd., and he owes suit at Court every 3 weeks. Richard Perfect 
holds 6 acres of arable land, and pays per annum \ lb. of pepper 
at the feast of St. Augustine in Summer, price 6^. John Mau- 
travers pays per annum r lb. of pepper at the feast of All Saints, 
price \zd., for having a way to his mill. William Osebern holds one 
messuage with a curtilage, and pays therefor per annum 2^. at 

2 terms, viz., at the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary iid., and at 
the feast of St. Michael iid. Adam ^f3"^fr</ holds one acre of meadow, 
and pays therefor per annum iid. at the feast of St. Augustine in 
Summer. Sum of the rents, 9^. ^\d. ; sum of the works, 4(/. 

There are there 5 other free tenants for life, of whom John le Cole, 
Richard Pendel, and /^Aw Pillok each holds one messuage and half 
a virgate of arable land, and pays per annum 40J., viz., each by himself 
13J. 4(f. at 2 terms of the year, viz., at the feast of the Annunciation 
of the Blessed Mary 6^. 8^., and at the feast of St. Michael bs. Sd., 
and they shall plough for one day in Summer, and the work of each 
of them is worth 2d. Walter le Rok holds 10 acres of arable land, 
and pays therefor per annum 5^. at the 4 principal terms of the 
year, and shall give at the feast of St. Martin 2 cocks and 8 hens for 
chersete, and they are worth 2\d., price of the cock id., and of the 
hen ^d. Geoffrey de Horeputte holds a certain croft which is called 
Cumbe crofte, and pays per annum zs. ^d. at the 4 principal terms 
of the year by equal portions. Sum of the rents and chersete, 
47J. t^d. ; sum of the works, bd. 

There are there 14 holding in villeinage, each of whom holds 
one messuage and half a virgate of arable land, and they pay 
per annum at the feast of ^St. Michael is. \\d., viz., each by 



300 Wiltshire 

himself 2j</., and they shall give at the feast of St. Martin for 
chersete 5 quarters 2 bushels of wheat, viz., each of them 

3 bushels, and they are worth 21s., price of the quarter 4J., 
and they shall give of hundredsilver at the feast of St. Martin 
2s. 4</., each for himself 2d. ; and they shall work from the feast of 
St. Michael up to the gule of August, each of them for 3 days 
in the week with one man, and the day's work is worth ^d. ; and 
they shall work from the gule of August up to the feast of 
St. Michael, each of them for 3 days in the week with one man, 
and the day's work is worth id. : sum of the rents with chersete 
and hundredsilver, 2bs. ^d. 

Sum of the works of the whole year, £$ $s. 

There is there one holding in villeinage, who holds one messuage 
and 10 acres of arable land and pays 4J. per annum at the 

4 principal terms by equal portions, and he shall give for chersete 
at the feast of St. Martin 4 hens and one cock, and they are worth 
4^</., price of the hen id. and of the cock ^d., and he ought to 
agist the lord's pigs, and he shall give id. for hundredsilver at the 
feast of St. Martin. 

Sum of the rents with chersete and hundredsilver, 4J. s^d. 

And there are 6 holding in villeinage, each of whom holds one 
messuage and the fourth part of one virgate of land, and each of them 
shall give id. for hundredsilver at the feast of St. Andrew, and each 
of them shall give 4 hens and one cqck at the feast of St. Martin, 
and they are worth 2s. \d., price of the hen id. and of the cock ^d., 
and they shall work one day in the week from the feast of 
St. Michael up to the gule of August, each of them with one man, 
and the day's work is worth \d., and they shall work from the gule 
of August up to the feast of St. Michael, each of them for 2 days in 
the week with one man, and the day's work is worth id. : sum of 
the chersete and hundredsilver, 2s. gd. Sum of the works by the 
year, 20s. (?) bd. 

There are there 4 cottagers, each of which holds one cottage 
with a curtilage and pays i2d. per annum at the 4 principal terms 
by equal portions, and each of them shall give at the feast of 
St. Martin one hen for chersete, price of the hen id., and they are 
worth 4^. : sum of the rent and chersete, 4J. \d. There is there 
one cottar who pays izd. per annum at the 4 terms. There is 
there one cottage with one croft which pays per annum 14//. at the 
4 principal terms by equal portions ; also another cottage which 
pays per annum iid. at the said terms: sum, 4J. \d. The pleas 
and perquisites of the Court are worth per annum los. 

Sum-total, £ib ^. \^d. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 301 

Reprises of rent paid to tlie Abbot of MrJmesbury yearly at the 
feast of St. Andrew, ^s. id. ; also to the Guild of Malmesbury by 
the year is. Sd. at 2 terms, viz., at the feast of the Annunciation of 
the Blessed Mary i6d., and at the feast of St. Michael i6d. Sum 
of the reprises 7.?. lod. 

And so the extent of the manor is worth, clear, ;^i5 i6s. 6\d. 

John Matidut, nephew \_nepos] of John Maudut deceased, is his 
next heir, and is aged 21 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 31 Edward I, No. 38. 



iSobert He 'Barneitcp^ 

"W • • • 

I nCjmSltlOn taken at Devizes on Sunday next after the 
X feast of St. Lawrence, 31 Edward I ! 1303], before John de 
Hertrigge, sheriff of Wilts, by Adam Hardyn;:^, Roger Bubbe, William 
Percehay, John de Boiirle, John Caynel, Wil'.am de Caynes, Richard 
de Comerwelle, Thomas Roily, Robert le Why/', Waller Willam, Henry 
Willam, and Alan Bruton, if it be to the damage of the King or 
others if he should grant to Robert de Bardeneye that he may give 
and assign to the Abbess and nuns of Lacok 2 messuages and 
2^ virgates of land in Nactone next Lacok, to hold to them and 
their successors for ever, or not, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others. 

The said messuage and land are held in chief of the said Abbess 
by the service of yj. of yearly rent, and are worth per annum, 
clear, 15^. 

There remains to the said Robert de Bardeneye 100 shillings of 
land and tenement, besides the said gift, which suffice for the 
customs and services duly to be done as well for the said messuage 
and land given as for those remaining to the said Robert, and for 
all other charges which he sustained, and was wont to sustain, as 
in suits, views of frankpledge, aids, tallages, vigils, fines, redemp- 
tions, amercements, contributions, and other charges whatsoever. 
The said Robert may be put on assizes, juries, and other recog- 
nizances whatsoever, as before the said gift he was wont to be put. 
The country by the said assignment through the default of the 
said Robert will not be charged with a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 31 Edward I, File 42, No. 3. 



302 Wiltshire 



OTilUam De i^arDene* 

^r • • • 

I nCjmSltlOn made before the escheator at Marlborough, 
JL 9th September, 31 Edward I [1303], by the oath of Henry 
Stormy, John de la Ryvere, Philip Stormy, William de Stockes, Peter 
de Forsteburi, Geoffrey le Savage, John de Wolf hale, John Chauuin, 
William le Parler, John de Kepehull, Roger Bacon, and William de 
Somerset, if it be to the damage of the King or others if it be 
granted to William de Hardene that he may retain and have to him 
and his heirs one carucate of land in Shaldebourn : which said 
land the said William has of the demise and grant of Matilda, who 
was the wife of Richard de Hardene, who held it in dower of the 
inheritance of Roger de Hardene, and which the said Roger, to whom 
the said land ought to revert after the death of the said Matilda, 
remised and quitclaimed to the said William and his heirs, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if he should grant 
to the said William that he may retain and have the said land as 
is aforesaid. 

The said land is held of the King in chief by the service of the 
moiety of one serjeanty in the King's army, to wit, finding the 
moiety of one man armed with a habergeon, lance, and helmet of 
iron for 40 days at the charges of the said William. The said land 
is not held of any other or of the King, and is worth per annum, 
clear, 40J. 

The said Roger de Harden, besides the said lands, holds in 
Harden i^ acres of land by serjeanty of the King in chief, by the 
service of keeping one part of the forest of Savernaks which is 
called Broyl de Bedewinde, and the said land with the said custody 
is worth per annum, clear, zos. 

The said Roger holds in the vill of Harden of William de Harden 
one messuage and 2 carucates of land, by homage and the service 
of making suit at the court of the said William in Shaldebourn 
from 3 weeks to 3 weeks, and the said land is worth per annum, 
clear, looj. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 31 Edward I, File ^i, No. 11. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 303 



I nqUlSltlOn taken at Crikkelade on Wednesday next after 
L the feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, 31 Edward I [1303], 
by the oath oi James de Grondwell, John Ace, William Brian, Henry 
Eylmer, John de Canntebrugg, Richard de Cone, John de Neuill, 
Adam Fraunceys, John Wronge, Richard Costard, Thomas White, and 
Richard Brian, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King should 
grant to Geoffrey de Pulham that he may give and assign one 
messuage and 2 virgates of land in Latton to the Abbot and 
convent of Cyrencestre, to hold to them and their successors 
for ever. 

The said messuage and land are held of the said Abbot and 
convent by the service of \is. per annum, and are worth per 
annum, clear, saving the said services therefor due, 6s. 8d. 

No lands or tenements remain to the said Geoffrey besides the 
said gift. The country by his default will not be charged with 
a larger payment, because the said Geoffrey, by his very small 
tenure, could not be put, neither was wont to be put, on any 
assizes, juries, or recognizances, neither did he sustain any charges 
for the said tenements as in suits, views of frankpledges, or any 
other things whatsoever, except only rendering to the said Abbot 
and convent the service aforesaid. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 31 Edward I, File 42, No. i. 



giol^n De J^urlle ann iHabel 510 tnife* 

T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Exeter before the Mayor and bailiffs, 
± 7th May, 31 Edward I [1303], by the oath of Walter Tauntejer 
and others, who say that 

Devon. 

It is not to the prejudice of the King or others, saving only the 
diminution of the value of the tenement to John de Puylle and 
Mabel his wife and their heirs, if the King should grant that the 
said John and Mabel may give one messuage in Exeter to the Abbot 
and convent of Tavistock .... 



304 Win shire 

Wilts. 

There remains to the said John and Mabel at Domerham, in 
CO. Wilts, 15 librates of land and more besides the said gift and 
assignment, which suffice for the customs and services duly to be 
made as well for the said messuage as for the tenements retained, 
and for all other charges to be sustained, because the said messuage 
owes no service to the King. The heirs of the said John and Mabel 
by reason of the said messuage ought not to be put on assizes, 
juries, or recognizances, because the city of Exeter, by the charters 
of the now King and his progenitors, is quit of such juries, assizes, 
and recognizances to be taken outside the City. The said messuage 
ought to be taxed as the said city shall be taxed, and so it will owe 
nothing to the King. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 31 Edward /, File 43, No. 14.. 



milUam 0on of J^ugl^ ne 9!ppele, 

Inquisition taken at New Sarum .... feast of 
St. Lawrence, 31 Edward I [1303], heiore John de Hertrugg, 
sheriff of Wilts, by the oath of Robert Bede, Edmund Falbe, William 
de Wyly, William le Afaressc/iall, Hugh Sireman, John le Prouie, Peter 
de Wodef .... Welylond, John •le Frye, John Chaunteclere, 
Geoffrey Waryn, and Nicholas le Hordere, whether it be to the 
damage of the King or others if he should grant to William son of 
Hugh de Ippele that he may give and assign one acre of land in 
Bymerton to William de Ippele, parson of the church of Fugheleston, 
to hold to him and his successors, parsons of the said church, for 
ever, or not, who say that 

It is not to the damage of anyone except only of William le 
Espicer, of New Sarum, of whom the said acre is held for one 
penny of silver of yearly rent for all service, by which penny 
escheats, wards, and marriages might happen to the said William. 
The said acre is worth per annum, clear, is. There remains to the 
said William 1 00s. of land per annum in the county of Southampton, 
which he holds of the King in socage. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 31 Edward I, File 44, No. 21. 



Inquisiimies Post Mortem. 305 



Extent upon the true value of the knight's fees and ad- 
vowsons of churches which were of Warin Maudut in 
CO. Wilts on the day that 'he died, made at Wermenistre on the 
5th day of December, 32 Edward I [1303], by the oath q{ Nicholas 
Afakmayns, Nicholas de la Mare, Robert Mauger, Robert Swocynger, 
John le Boteler, John Bastard, William Wynebold, William de Maunde- 
vile, Richard de Anesi, Roger de Stoke, Thomas Gronny, and John le 
Tannere, who say that 

Nicholas de la Mare held the fifth part of one knight's fee in 
Bisschoppestrowe of the said Warin Maudut, and that fifth part is 
worth per annum, clear, is. 

There are no more fees in the^ said county belonging to the said 
Warin, nor any advowsons of churches. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 32 Edward I, No. 4. . 



InOUlSltlOn taken at Fissherton, 16th December, 32 
Edward I [1303], of the lands and tenements which were 
oi Henry Aucher in co. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath 
of Alan de Langeford, Robert le Polenter, William de Wyli, Hugh 
Syreman, William le Mareschal, Elias Wympler, William Dase, 
Nicholas Serle, Geoffrey Waryn, William Kydenot, John le Proute, and 
Peter de Wodejord, who say that 

Henry Aucher held the manor of Fissherton of the Earl of Sarum 
by the service of half a knight's fee. 

The easements of the court are worth per annum bd. There are 
there in the demesne 24 acres of arable land, which are worth 
per annum 12s., price of the acre bd. Also 12 acres of meadow, 
which are worth per annum iis., price of the acre \2d. There is 
there one dovecote, which is worth per annum 3J. Also one water- 
mill, and it is worth per annum ;^4 : sum, 107J. bd. There are 
there 16 free tenants, of whom Robert le Polenter holds one virgate 
of land, and pays per annum is. at the 4 terms of the year, to wit, 
at the Nativity of the Lord 6d., at the Annunciation of the Blessed 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. II. 20 

2 1 



3o6 Wiltshire 

Mary 6d., at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist bd., and at the 
feast of St. Michael dd., for all service saving suit at court from 
3 weeks to 3 weeks. John Piscator holds one messuage, and pays 
per annum y. at the said terms by equal portions, and owes suit at 
court like the said Robert. John Nedlere holds one tenement, and 
pays per annum 2J. at the said terms, and owes suit as above. 
John de Lye holds one messuage, and .pays per annum zs. at the 
said terms, and owes suit as above. Hugh Les/}'{?) holds one 
messuage with a curtilage, and pays per annum 2s. Sd. at the said 
terms, and owes suit as above. Walter Base holds one messuage, 
and pays per annum \bd. at the said terms, and owes suit as above. 
William Base holds one curtilage, and pays per annum \bd. by the 
terms as above, and owes suit as above. John Duhbere holds one 
messuage with a curtilage, and pays per annum bd. by the terms as 
above. John de Homyion holds one curtilage and 2 acres of land, 
and pays per annum y. Sd. at the terms as above. Richard Pinnok 
holds 2 tenements with curtilages, and pays per annum 5^. at the 
said terms. Amice Wynston holds one curtilage, and pays per 
annum 2j. at the said terms. Elias Wympler holds one messuage 
with a curtilage and 2 acres of land, and pays per annum is. \d. at 
the said terms. Andrew le Cumener holds one messuage with 
a garden and 16 acres of land, and pays per annum 35. zd. at the 
said terms ; and John Pynnok holds one messuage with a curtilage 
and 6 acres of land, and pays per annum 2j. bd. at the said terms. 
Sum of the rent of the free tenants, 34J. bd. There are there 
10 customars, who pay altogether 255-. at 2 terms of the year by 
equal portions, viz., at Easter and Michaelmas. The sum of the 
rent of the customars appears, and they owe no works. The pleas 
and perquisites are worth per annum 35'. 

Aucher, son of the said Henry Aucher, is his next heir, and is aged 
21 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 32 Edward I, No. 38. 



g!ngelramu0 le (KHale^0» 
-_- • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Okebourn, 21st May, 32 Edward I 

J. [1304], of the lands and tenements which were oi In gel ram 

le Wakys in co. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath of 

William Cronk, Henry de Okeborn, William Frank, John atte Hulle, 

William Joup, Adam Rossd., Walter de Oppam, Walter ate Hamstalle, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 307 

Adam Fort, Philip atte Mere, John le Bolde, and William le Drye, who 
say that 

The said Ingelram was not seised of any lands or tenements 
in the said county on the day that he died, but at one time he had 
a certain tenement in Okebourn, which he long before his death 
demised to Alexander de Okebourn, chivaler, for the term of his life, 
he paying per annum to the said Ingelram or his heirs 10 marks 
per annum in the feast of St. Michael for all service. 

The said tenement is held of Sir Henry Tyeys by knight's service. 

John le Waleys is the son and heir of the said Ingelram, and is 
aged 30 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 32 Edward I, No. 45. 



TT • • • 

I nqillSltlOn taken at Wodhull, 13th July, 32 Edward I 

A [1304], of the lands and tenements which were o^ Edward de 
Besilles in co. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath of 

Waller Maudut, John Russel, Robert Russel, Roger de Thornhull, 
Richard Styne, William Grandyn, John Edmond, Thomas Parys, 

William de Doddeford, John Brian, John de Molendino, and John 
Roser, who say that 

Edward de Besilles held the ma«or of Wodhull, in co. Wilts, of 
the King in chief by the service of 4 barbed arrows, price 4*/. 

The court of the said manor, with the gardens, pools, and curti- 
lages, is worth per annum 26^. %d. There is there one dovecote, 
and it is worth per annum 35. 4^/. There are there in the demesne 
of arable land 244 acres, and the acre is worth per annum 12^. : 
sum, £ii 45-. Also of meadow that can be mown 36 acres, and 
the acre is worth per annum zs. : sum, jzs. There is there one 
plot which is called Muleham, and it is worth per annum $s. Also 
a certain pasture which is called Aldelond, and it is worth per 
annum 6s. Sd. Also another plot which is worth per annum ^s. 
And the pasture in fallow is worth per annum los. There is there 
a certain water-mill, and it is worth per annum i y. ^d. Also one park, 
the profit whereof is worth per annum 135. ^d. Sum, ;^i9 17^. j^.d. 
There are there 6 free tenants, of whom William Grandyn holds 
one messuage and 2 virgates of land, and pays per annum i lb. of 
pepper, price lod., at the Nativity of the Lord, and he owes suit 



3oS Wiltshire 

. at the court of the lord from 3 weeks to 3 weeks, and the suit is 
worth per annum \zd. The same William holds 4 acres of meadow 
at the will of the lord, and pays per annum \hs. at the 4 principal 
terms of the year by equal portions. William de la Haye holds one 
virgate of land without a messuage, and pays per annum \d. in the 
feast of St. Michael, and does suit like the said William. Martin 
Coqus holds one messuage and one croft for the term of his life, 
and pays per annum i lb. of cummin in the feast of St. Michael, 
price 2d., and does suit like the said William. Master Thomas de 
Gloucester holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays 
per annum id. in the feast of St. Michael, and does suit like the 
sai'd William. Cecil Lotrix holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
izd. in the feast of the Blessed Mary in March, and does suit like 
the said William^ The Prioress of Amhreshury takes the tenth 
sheaf of all the lands of the demesne, and pays per annum 5,^. in 
the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula. Sum of the rents of the free 
tenants, 23J. 2^., except suits. There are there 9 customars, and 
each of them holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and 
pays per annum 4J. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions, and each of them shall give to the lord 3 hens and one 
cock in the feast of St. Martin, price per head id. Sum of the 
rents of the customars, 36J. Sum of the cocks and hens, 36. Sum 
of the money, is. There are there cottars, of whom Sybil the 
widow holds one cottage at the will of the lord, and pays per 
annum zs. at two terms of the year by equal portions, to wit, at the 
feast of St. Mary in March and at the feast of St. Michael. John 
Magge holds one cottage, and pays per annum iid. at the terms of 
the bondmen. John Lovelot holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
\zd. at the same terms. The pleas and perquisites of the Court 
are worth per annum lox. 

Sum-total, ;^23 13^. bd. 

Peter de Besilles, son of the said Edward de Besilles, is his next 
heir, and is aged 2 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 32 Edward /, No. 59. 



€tjmunt) tje /Hortuo iHari. 

T • • • 

I nCJlllSltlOn made at Chippeham, nth December, 33 

X Edward I [1304], of the fees and advowsons of churches 
which were of Edmund de I\fortuo Mari in co. Wilts on the 
day that he died, by the oath olRohcrf Russel, Adam Haryng, John 



Inquisitiones Post MorU7rt. 309 

de Bourle, Robert Seliman, John Caynel, Richard Boll, Edward Faber, 
Robert Pistor, Robtrt White, Richard de Comerwelle, Robert de Bardeneye^ 
and Thomas Roily, who say that 

William de Middelhope held one knight's fee in Suryndene, in 
CO. Wilts, of Edmund de Mortuo Mari on the day the said Edmund 
died, and it is worth per annum, clear, \os. Hugo de Kctnereswelle 
held the fourth piart of one knight's fee in Aldryngton in the said 
county of the said Edmund, and it is worth per afinum, clear, loj. 
Robert Russel held half a knight's fee in Bradefeld, in the hundred 
of Malmesbury, of Edmund de Mortuo Mari, and it is worth 
per annum, clear, 20J. Alan la Souche held of the said Edmund 
2 knight's fees in Hulprynton, in the said county, and they are 
worth per annum, clear, ;^io. 

The Prior of Bradenestok held one knight's fee in Tockenham, 
in the said county, of the said Edmund, and it is worth per annum, 
clear, 66j. ^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., ^z Edward I, No. 63 {b). 



T" • • • 

I nC[UlSlLlOn taken before the King's escheator at Sarum, 
X 6th May, 32 Edward I [1304], if it be to the damage of the 
King or others if the King should grant io Jordan de Larkstok that 
he may enfeoff Robert de Miccheldeure of one messuage, one virgate 
of land, 3 acres of meadow, and 'is. rent in Larkstok, by the oath 
of Robert Walraund, Philip Gogu, William Noble, Stephen de Beauner, 
John de Lucy, John Hulon, Stephen Hulon, John Prat, John de 
Ganejord, John de Nevylle, Thomas Dunpol, and John le Prest, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King should 
grant to the szid Jordan that he may enfeoff the said Robert de 
Micheledevre of the said premises : to hold to him and his heirs of 
the King and his heirs by the services thereof due and accustomed 
for ever. 

The said premises in Larkstok and other tenements there, out of 
which the said rent is forthcoming, are held of the King in chief 
by the serjeanty of keeping the King's forest of Claryngdon, and 
are worth per annum los. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., File 45, No. 9. 

2 t « 



3 1 o Wilis hire 



-w- • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn taken at Fyssherton before Henry de Cobeham, 
JL sheriff of Wilts, on Sunday next after the feast of the 
Assumption of the Blessed Mary, 32 Edward I [1304], by the oath 
of Martin le Teynturer, Henry Baudrt, Adam de Wynton, John le Rede, 
Thomas le Irmongere, William le Haitere, Walter de Hampton, Simon 
de Oxon, William le Cauenac, William de Hakeburne, John de Langeford, 
Henry de Wymburne, and Alan de Canynges, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King should grant to Reginald de Tudeworth, of New Sarum, that he 
may give and assign 5 marks of rent in New Sarum to a certain 
chaplain to celebrate divine service every day in the Church of 
St. Edmund the Confessor of Sarum, for the souls of the said 
Reginald and Joan his wife and of all the faithful deceased : to hold 
to him and his successors chaplains there for ever. 

The said Reginald holds the said 5 marks of rent of the Bishop 
of Sarum in chief freely and without doing any service for the same, 
and the said rent is worth per annum, clear, 5 marks. 

There are lands and tenements remaining to the Sd^A Reginald in 
Todeworth, in co. Sarum, beyond the said gift and assignment to 
the value of ^10, and they suffice for the customs and services duly 
to be done as well for the said rent so given as for the tenements 
retained, and for all other charges which he sustains or was wont 
to sustain, as in suits, views of frankpledge, aids, tallages, vigils, 
fines, redemptions and amercements, contributions, and other 
charges whatsoever. The said Reginald may be put on assizes, 
juries, and other recognizances as he was wont to be put before the 
said gift, and the country by the said assignment through the 
default of the said Reginald will not be charged with a larger 
payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 32 Edward I, File 46, No. 10. 



Cl^omajs 0on of ^lureDu^ ne cBrle^tofte, 

Inquisition made before John de Hertrugg, sheriff of Wilts, 
at Merleberg, on Thurday next before the feast of St. Thomas 
the Apostle, 32 Edward I [1303], by the oath of Henry Vigerous, 
Laurence Snappe, Richard de Habervill, Walter de Camera, John 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 3 1 1 

Fraunkeleytiy Ely de Kyngesion, John Lovely Peter de Gore, William 
Flares, John le Fos, Simon Syward, and Henry de Dodyngton, whether 
it be to the damage of the King or others if the King should grant 
to Thomas son o( Aluredus de Erlestok that he may retain to himself 
and his heirs for ever of the King by the same services which the 
said Thomas shall do to the said Matthew yearly for the said ter^e- 
ments, or not, one mill which is called Mershmull, with one acre of 
land thereto adjacent, and all the land and tenement which Juliana 
la Proute held of Matthew son of John : which said Matthew held 
the said mill, land, and tenement of the King during the life of the 
said Afatthew of the demise of the said King, and demised the same 
to the said Thomas to hold for the life of the said Matthew, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if he should grant 
to the said Thomas for himself and his heirs the said mill, land, and 
tenement for ever, by the same services which the said Thomas shall 
make to the said Matthew yearly for the said premises. The said 
premises are held of the King and not of any other, by the service 
of 6j. per annum. 

The said Juliana held in Erlestoke one messuage which is worth 
per annum, clear, zs., and 7^ acres of land in the marsh, each acre 
whereof is worth, clear, 8</., and 15 acres of land in the sand, each 
acre whereof is worth per annum 6^., and upon the hill 7 acres of 
land, each acre worth per annum zd., and 2 acres of meadow, each 
acre worth per annum \%d. The common of pasture belonging to 
the said tenement is worth per annum rod. 

Sum-total, i%s. \d. 

Sum, except the services due, zzs. 4^. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 32 Edward I, File 47, No. 14. 



I nqUlSltlOn made at Sarum, 4th May, 33 Edward I 
X [1305], of the lands and tenements which were of Edmund 
de Muljord in co. Wilts on the day that he died, by the oath of 
John de Sutton, Thomas Chamberleyn, William le Dun, Robert Bede, 
John Lucy, Hugh Sireman, John de Nevill, Hugh le Jonge, John de 
Netheravene, John Swening, Robert Frankeleyn, and John Molendinar' , 
who say that 



312 Wilts hi 7'e 

Edmund de Mulford held one messuage and one virgate of land 
in Muleford, in the said county, of the King in chief, by the service 
of keeping the King's forest of Clarendon with one man on foot. 

The said messuage and land are worth per annum, clear, \os. %d. 

The King transferred to his mother the Lady Eleanor, formerly 
Queen of England, the wardship of the lands and tenements afore- 
said, with the marriage .... and that the said Queen gave 
the said wardship and marriage to James Daubeney, her groom (?), 
and the said James sold the said wardship and marriage to William 
k Noble. 

Anne, daughter of the said Edmund, is his next heir, and is aged 
24 years, and satisfied William le Noble for her marriage, but she is 
not yet married, but is entirely single. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 33 Edward I, No. i. 



I nQlllSltlOn taken at Borbache before the escheator, 
X 3rd December, 34 Edward I [1305], of the lands and 
tenements which were of Henry Stormy in co. Wilts on the day that 
he died, by the oath of William Waryn, Ralph Malavayn, John de 
Kepenhull, Eustace Savage, Robert BrayboeJ, John Hamelyn, John de 
Humbre, Geoffrey Savage, John Fraunkelayn, Stephen de Southcote, 
William de Bosco, and John de Somerset, who say that 

Henry Stormy held the manor of Borbach and Conlesfeld, which 
is a member of Borbach, and the bailiwick of the forest of Savernake 
of the King in chief, by the service of one horseman in his army in 
the war with a habergeon, an iron helmet, and a horse equipped. 

The court there, with the garden and close adjacent, is worth 
per annum 3^'. There are there in the demesne 320 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum £\, price of the acre 3^. ; also 
1 1 acres of meadow of bulmede, which are worth per annum 4^. "jd., 
price of the acre 5</. There is there one pasture which is 
called Tymerruggedoune, which is worth per annum 6s. Sd. 
Sum, ;^4 14J. ^d. 

There are there free tenants, of whom John de Haveringge holds 
one messuage and one carucate of land, and pays per annum \os. 
at Easter and Michaelmas by equal portions. Robert Homeden 
holds one messuage and three virgates of land, and pays per annum 
los. at the said terms. Geoffrey Oppegras holds one messuage and 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 313 

one virgate of land, and pays per annum 4J. at the said terms. 
Richard J ekes holds one messuage and lo acres of land, and pays per 
annum ^s. wd.dX the said terms. Robert Theband holds one messuage 
and 10 acres of land, and pays per annum y. at the said terms. 
John Semere holds one messuage and ten acres of land, and pays 
per annum 3J. td. at the said terms. Walier Trenchenent holds one 
messuage, and pays per annum \id. at the said terms. Michael 
Someter holds one messuage and 10 acres of land, and pays per 
annum 6^. at the said terms. Agnes Averil holds one messuage, 
and pays per annum 3^. at the said terms. Nicholas de Dounion 
holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, and pays per annum 
8j. 6</. at the said terms. Roger le Hunte holds one messuage and 
S acres of land, and pays per annum \']d. at the said terms. Thomas 
Asser holds one messuage, and pays per annum 3J. at the said 
terms. Walter Badecok holds one messuage, and pays per annum \s. 
at the said terms. Sum of the rent of the free tenants, 6oj. \od. 

There are there 6 customars, each of whom holds one messuage 
and ID acres of land, and pays per annum 5J. at the said terms by 
equal portions, and each of them shall give to the lord in the feast 
of St. Martin 3 hens and one cock, and shall give pannage if they 
have pigs. There are there 4 other customars, each of whom holds 
one messuage and 10 acres of land, and pays per annum 3J. at the 
said terms, and each of them shall give to the lord in the feast of 
St. Martin 3 hens and one cock, price per head \d. 

There are at Tymerrugg next Borbach 2 customars, of whom 
Richard de Tymerugg holds z acres of land and pays per annum 3J. 
at the said terms. Robert de Timerugg holds one messuage and one 
acre of land, and pays per annum zs. at the said terms. Sum of 
the rents of the customars, 47^. Sum of the hens and cocks, 40. 
Sum of the money, ^s. 4^. 

There are there 5 cottars, of whom Walter Lay holds one 
cottage with a curtilage, and pays per annum zs. at the said terms. 
Thomas Asser holds one cottage, and pays per annum izd. at the 
said terms. Robert Soc holds one cottage, and pays per annum 
zs. 6d. at the said terms. William Fitin holds one cottage, and 
pays per annum zs. zd. at the said terms. Richard le . . . , 
holds one cottage, and pays per annum zs. zd. at the said terms. 
Sum of the rents of the cottars, 95. lod. The pleas and perquisites 
of the court are worth per annum 4?. 

Also at Conelesfeld there is one messuage with a close which is 
worth zs. There are there in the demesne 40 acres of arable land, 
which are worth per annum \os., price of the acre ^d. ; also 10 
acres of meadow in the demesne, which are worth per annum 15J., 



SH 



Wiltshire 



price of the acre 18^. Sum, z-js. There are there 6 free tenants, 
of whom Philip de Lusteshull holds one messuage and 2 virgates of 
land, and pays per annum in the feast of St. Michael bs. Sd. John 
Longe holds one messuage and 17 acres of arable land, and pays 
per annum 3^. at the feasts of the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary and St. Michael by equal portions. Michael Freman holds 
one messuage and pays per annum zzd. at the said terms. Walter 
Gamelyn holds one acre of land, and pays per annum iid. at the 
said terms. John Frensche holds 3 acres of arable land, and pays 
per annum 2^. at the said terms. John Helte holds one cottage 
and one acre of land, and pays per annum i id. at the said terms. 
Sum of the rent of the free tenants, 15^. bd. 

There are there 6 customars, each of whom holds one messuage 
and 18 acres of arable land, and pays per annum 5J. at the feasts 
of St. Mary in March and St. Michael by equal portions ; and each 
of them shall give to the lord in the feast of St. Martin 3 hens and 
one cock, price per head \d., and shall give pannage if he has pigs. 
Sum of the rents of the customars, 30J. There are there 3 other 
customars, each of whom holds one messuage and 6 acres of arable 
land, and pays per annum is. bd. at the said terms, and shall give 
to the lord in the feast of St. Martin 2 hens and one cock, price as 
above, and shall give pannage if he has pigs. Sum of the rent of 
the said customars ']s. bd. Sum of the hens, 24; sum of the cocks, 
9. Sum of the money, is. qd. There are there 2 cottars, of whom 
Alice Goppe holds one cottage, and pays per annum i ^d. at the said 
terms. John Longue holds one cottage, and pays per annum 1 zd. 
at the said terms. Sum of the rent of the cottars, 2s. \d. The 
custody of the said forest of Savernak is worth per annum, clear, zos. 

Sum, 104J. \od. 

Henry Stormy, son of Henry Stormy, is his next heir, and is aged 
23 years. 

Sum of the whole value of Borbach and Coulesfeld, with the 
bailiwick of the said forest, £ib 4^. zd. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 33 Edward I, No. 65. 



atiam ne ^tratton^ 



I nqUlSltlOn taken before Henry de Coheham, sheriff of 

JL Wilts, on Friday in the feast of St. Vincent, 33 Edward I 

[1305], by the oath oi John Ace, James de Grundwell, William de 

Maiindevilky Robert Chann, Elias de Maundeville, Robert de Lusteshull, 



Inquisittones Post Mortetn. 315 

Robert de Wykes, Robert Avenel, Walrand de Wydyhulle, William Bryan, 
Peter de Waldeco/e, and Adam Fraunceys, who say that 

Adam de Slratton, who was disinherited for felony which he had 
committed, held 9 messuages and 10 virgates of land in Over- 
stratton next High Swyndon of John Walraund, father of Adam 
Walraund, for the term of the life of the said Adam, by the service 
of 5J., which Margaret the Queen of England now holds. The 
said messuage and land were in the King's hand for one year and 
one day, and Richard de Combe, then sheriff of Wilts, took the 
explees of the year and the day, and ought to answer for the same. 

To the King and his Council shows Adam Walrand that whereas 
Adam de Strattone held of the said Adam Walrand 9 messuages and 
10 virgates of land in the vill of Overstratton for the term of his 
life, paying per annum sr., of the which services he was seised as 
by the mean his true tenant until the felony done by him for the 
which he was attainted, whereby the King seised' into his hands the 
lands and tenements of the said Adam de Strattone, so that after 
that the King had the year and the waste of the premises, the said 
Adam approached the King's Council in the last Parliament and 
prosecuted his bill concerning the said matter, whereto it was 
answered that he should go to the King's Chancery and sue out 
a writ to the sheriff of Wilts, and the said sheriff should cause to 
come before him 12 good and lawful men by whom the truth might 
be the better enquired into whether the said 9 messuages and 
10 virgates of land in Overstratton, of the which he was dis- 
inherited, and whether the said Adam de Stratton was tenant, and 
of whom he held them, and who now holds them, and whether the 
tenements remained in the King's hand for a year and a day or not, 
and who had the year and the waste thereof after he was attainted, 
and that the sheriff should return into the Chancery according to 
that which was found by the said inquisition. The said Adam 
Walrand has come to the Chancery, and has often requested that 
he might have a writ according to the form of the inquisition 
returned as the one who is the right heir, and to whom it ought to 
descend as his escheat after the year and the waste, and the said 
Adam Walrand is answered by the Chancellor that for that the lady 
the Queen is in seisin of the said tenements as by the gift of the 
King that the said Adam should approach the King's Council for ; 
because the Queen has the said tenements by livery of the King he 
dare do nothing without the King's commandment, whereupon the 
said Adam Walrand prays for remedy for the salvation of his soul. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 33 Edivard I, No. 121. 



3 1 6 Wiltshire 



Inquisition taken at Mere before the King's escheator, 
14th November, 33 Edward I [1305], by the oath of Walter 
de Horsington, John de Pimperlegh, Robert de la Legh, Eustace de 
Borthon, John de Immere, Eudo de Slorlon, Roger de Lokynton, John 
le Palmere, Roger Cleymound, Richard de Borthon, Edward. Loddok, 
and Walter Pinnok, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King should 
grant to Adam Wyking, of Mere, that he may give and grant one 
messuage and i^ carucates of land in Mere to Hugh de Denford and 
John de Fayrejord: to hold to th,em and their heirs for ever, by the 
same services by which the said Adam holds them at present. The 
said messuage and land are held of the King in chief, as of his 
manor of Mere, by the service of zzs. for all service, to be paid 
yearly to the bailiffs of the said manor at the 4 principal terms of 
the year by equal portions, and paying \os. yearly to the Abbess 
of Schejton, by the assignment of Richard formerly Earl of Cornwall 
and lord of Mere, and are worth per annum, clear, 60^., besides 
the said service. No lands or tenements remain to the said Adam 
beyond the said grant in co. Wilts or elsewhere. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 33 Edward I, File 52, No. 8. 



Inquisition taken before Henry de Cobeham, sheriff of 
Wilts, at New Sarum on Wednesday next after the feast 
of St. Peter which is called in Cathedra [no year given] : writ 
dated 26th January, 33 Edward 1 [1305], by the oath oi John de 
Cowel, Stephen de Harpedene, John de Braundeston, John de Langejord, 
Walter le B'olde, Richard de Long, William le Hattere, Robert Chese, 
Robert de Laverkestoke, John Bisshop, Richard Sturmy, and John le 
^ede, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King should 
grant Xo John le Stut that he may give and assign 57J. ^d. of rent 
in New Sarum to a certain chaplain to celebrate divine service 
every day for the souls of the said John and Cecilia his wife, and 
Matilda^ formerly the wife of the said John, and his ancestors, in 



hiquisitiones Post Mortem, 317 

the church of St. Thomas the Martyr of New Sarum : to hold to 
the said chaplain and his successors for ever. The said rent is 
held of the Bishop of Sarum by the service of \d. per annum for 
all services. There is no mean for the said rent between the King 
and the said John except the said Bishop. The lands and tene- 
ments remaining to the said John le Stut beyond the said gift and 
assignment suffice for the customs and services duly to be done, as 
well for the said rent as for the rents and tenements retained, and 
for all other charges which he sustained and was wont to sustain 
as in suits, views of frankpledge, tallages, vigils, fines, redemptions, 
amercements, contributions, and other charges whatsoever. The 
said John may be put on assizes, juries, and recognizances what- 
soever, as was wont to be done before the said gift. The county 
by the default of the said John will not be charged with a larger 
payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 33 Edward I, Folio 53, No. i. 



Inquisition taken before Henry de Co)>eham, sheriff of 
Wilts, at Latton on Friday in the feast of St. Vincent, 
33 Edward I [1305], by the oath of Adam Walraund, Robert de 
Lusfeshulle, Robert Avenel, Walrand Perys, William Bryan, John de 
Nevylle, Simon Was, William de Mordene, Peter de Wahtacrei?), John 
de Grauntebrigg, John ThyldulJ, and James de Grundwell, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King if the King 
should grant to Henry de Bluntesdon that he may give and assign 
one messuage, one carucate of land, 9 acres of meadow, and 7^. \d. 
rent in Bluntesdon St. Andrew, Bluntesdon Gay, North Wydyhull, 
and West Wydyhull, and the advowson, of the Church of Bluntesdon 
St. Andrew to 3 chaplains celebrating divine service every day in 
the Church of St. Andrew of Bluntesdon for the souls of the said 
Henry and all the faithful deceased, to hold to them and their 
successors chaplains there ; nor to the damage of any others except 
only the lords of that fee who for that reason will lose their relief 
or escheats. 

The said tenements are held of Sir John de la Mare together 
with the advowson of the said church, by the service of one mark, 
and are worth per annum, clear, loj., except the said service, and 



3 1 8 Wiltshire 

the said church is worth per annum, clear, \oos. There is no 
mean between the King and the said Henry de Bluntesdon except 
John de la Mare, who holds the same of the King in chief. There 
still remain to the said Henry lands and tenements to the value of 
loj., besides the said gift, which suffice for the customs and 
services duly to be done as well for the said premises so given 
as for those retained, and for all other charges to be sustained 
as in suits, views of frankpledge, aids, tallages, vigils, fines, 
redemptions, amercements, contributions, and other charges what- 
soever. The heirs of the said Henry may be put on assizes, juries, 
and other recognizances, as they were wont to be put before the 
said gift. The country by the said gift, through the default of 
the said Henry, will not be charged with a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 33 Edward I, File 53, No. 10. 



giol^n De iHaunDetill. 

-w- • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn taken before the escheator at Dorchester, 
X 3rd May, ^-^ Edward I [1305], by the oath oi John de Mule- 
bourne, Ralph de Rocheford, and others, if it be to the prejudice of 
the King or others if he should grant to John de Maundevill that he 
may enfeoff Robert le Fiz Payn and Isabella his wife of his manor of 
Merschswode [in co. Dorset], which is held of the King in chief 
as it is said, to hold to the said Robert and Isabella and the heirs 
of the said Robert by the King by the services therefor due and 
accustomed for ever, or not, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if he should grant 
to the said John de Maundevill that he may enfeoff the said Robert 
le Fiz Payn and Isabella his wife and the heirs of the said Robert of 
his said manor of Merschswode, which said manor is held of the 
King in chief by barony, together with the lands and tenement 
underwritten. The messuages within the said manor, with the 
close, are worth per annum half a mark. There are there 120 acres 
of arable land, which are worth per annum \os., price of the acre 
4^. ; also 20 acres of meadow, worth per annum 30J., price of the 
acre \%d. There is there a certain several pasture, which is worth 
per annum ros. Also a certain wood, the profit whereof is worth 
per annum half a mark. Also a pool, worth per annum izd. There 
is there a certain rent of assize of the free tenants per annum, viz. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 319 

50J. The rent of the customars per annum is 20^-. The services 
of the same are worth per annum \os. The hundred of la White- 
churche belonging to the said manor is worth per annum 30J. 
There remains to the said John, besides the said manor, the manor 
of Coker, in co. Somerset, which is worth per annum £10, but by 
whom or by what service it is held the jurors know not. The 
hundred of Coker, belonging to the said manor, remains to the 
said John, and is worth per annum half a mark. The manor of 
Suttone Maundevill, in co. Wilts, remains to the said John : it is 
held of the King in chief, but by what service is not known ; it is 
worth per annum £\^. 

Sum of the whole value of the manor of Merschwode per annum, 
£\o \\s. \d. 

Sum of the whole value of the lands and tenements remaining 
beyond the said manor, £\'^ 6s. %d. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 33 Edivard I, File 53, No. 24. 



Cl^omagJ De Cl^aucombe* 

I nOUlSltlOn taken at Sarum before the King's escheator, 
A 24th March, 33 Edward I [1305], by the oath of Alan de 
Langejofd, Edmund Falke, Robert Bede, Hugh Ereman, Robert de 
Brudecombe, William Kedenet, Nicholas Serle, Ralph Danger, Robert 
Geraud, William Cole, Peter Whippe, and Robert le Font, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King should 
grant to Thomas de Chaucoftibe, knight, that he may retain to him 
and his heirs for ever of the King and his heirs, by the same 
services by the which the said y<3-^« first held them of the King, one 
messuage, 100 acres of arable land, and 4 acres of meadow in 
Bereford St. Martin, and the bailiwick of the forestry of Gravelei 
in CO. Wilts, which he acquired to himself in fee without the King's 
licence oi John de Carentam, who held them of the King in chief. 
The said messuage, land, and bailiwick are held of the King in 
chief by the service of gj., to be paid yearly by the hands of the 
said Thomas to the sheriff of Wilts at the feast of St. Michael, and 
paying to the church of St. Mary of Sarum i2</. yearly for all 
service, and are worth per annum, clear, to wit, the said messuage 



320 Wiltshire 

and land, 26^. %d., and the said bailiwick i8j. besides the said 
service. There belong to the said bailiwick all the dead wood, 
ferns \_/tigera], housebote and haybote, and pasture for all the oxen, 
plough-horses, pigs, and sheep, as many as the forester of the said 
bailiwick had at all times of the year, without contradiction of any, 
save the forbidden month, together with fuel for the oven which 
belongs to the said bailiwick in the said forest. The said John 
Carentam and his ancestors were wont to have and take yearly 
all the dead wood and fern in the said forest, housebote, haybote, 
and pasture for all oxen, horses, pigs, and sheep, and all other 
animals except goats, at all times of the year except the forbidden 
month, at all times past, together with fuel for the said oven. 
No lands or tenements in the said county remain to the sdad John 
besides the said enfeoffment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 33 Edward I, File 54, No. 3. 



amtcia tie la IStttere* 

-w- • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn made before John Gireberd, sheriff of Wilts, 
X at Merleberg, on Sunday next after the feast of the Exaltation 
of Holy Cross, 33 Edward I [1305], by the oath oi John Ace, Robert 
de Lusieshulle, Richard Styne, William Grandyn, John de Chilton, 
Simon Was, John de Hardynton, Nicholas le Archer, James le Blak, 
Peter de Walecote, John le Frie, John de Colemede, Robert Rossel, and 
Roger Busshope, to enquire if it be to the damage of the King or 
others if he should grant to Amicia de la Riviere that she may give 
and grant the manor of Hampton Turvile, which is held of the 
King in chief as it is said, to Richard de la Riviere : to hold to him 
and his heirs of the King and his heirs by the services thereof due 
and accustomed for ever, or not, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if he should grant 
to Amicia de la Riviere that she may give the manor of Hampton 
Turvile to Richard de la Riviere : to hold to him and his heirs of 
the King and his heirs by the said services, because the said 
Amicia held the said manor in fee of the King: which said manor 
she demised to Richard de la Riviere for the term of his life, so 
that after the deaths of the said Richard and Amicia it ought to 
descend to John de la Riviere, as son and heir of the said Amicia, 
after whose death the King will lose the custody and marriage of 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 321 

the heir of the said John^ being within age : which said John holds 
lands and tenements of other lords, and not of the King, to the 
value of ;^ 1 00. The said manor is held in chief of the King, and 
not of any other, by the service of half a knight's fee, and is worth 
per annum, clear, £\o. No lands or tenements remain to the said 
Amicia besides the said gift and grant. 

Chan. Inq. a.g.d., 33 Edward I, File 54 No. 9. 



giol^n, 0on of mmtt tie (Upton, 

T • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn taken before Henry de Cobeham, sheriff of 

J- Wilts, at Lattone, on Friday in the feast of St. Vincent, 
33 Edward I [1305], by the oath of Adam Walraund, James de 
Grindwell, John Ace, Robert de Lusteshull, William Brian, Walrand 
Perys, John de Grauniebrigg, Adam Fraunceys, John ThildulJ, Thomas 
le Drapere, Richard atte Coue, and Richard Pernaunt, who say that 

It is not to the damage of the King or others if the King should 
grant to John, son of Walter de Upton, that he may give and assign 
one messuage and 2 virgates of land in Lattone to the Abbot and 
convent of Cyrencestre and their successors for ever. The said 
messuage and land are held of the said Abbot and convent 
immediately by the service of 10s. per annum, and are worth per 
annum, clear, 6s. 8d. There is no other mean between the King 
and the said John, son of Walter de Upton, except the said Abbot 
and convent. The saxd John has besides the said gift lands and 
tenements which suffice for the customs and services duly to be 
made, as well for the said lands so given as for the other lands and 
tenements retained, and for all other charges which he sustained 
and was wont to sustain as in suits, views of frankpledge, aids, 
tallages, vigils, fines, redemptions, amercements, contributions, 
and other charges whatsoever. And the said John may be put on 
assizes, juries, and other recognizances, as he was wont to be put 
before the said gift. And the country by the said gift, through the 
default of the said John, will not be charged with a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 33 Edward I, File 56, No. 6. 



WILTS INQ.— VOL. II, 2 I 

22 



32 2 Wiltshire 



T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator at Merle- 
X berg, i2th June, 34 Edward I [1306], by the oath of Walter 
Skylling, Richard le Bernir, Peter de Ore, William Durdaunt, Robert 
Bordon, John de Molendino of Rusteshale, Richard Atte Watere, 
Robert de Molendino of Wyvelesford, Peter le Eyr, John Clarisse^ 
Reginald le Forester, and John Potente, who say that 

Dionisia de Helynton, of Wedebergh, deceased, held of the King 
in chief, by knight's service, in Wedebergh, one messuage, 2 vir- 
gates of land, and iis. of yearly rent, and they are worth per 
annum, clear, 40^. 

William, son of the said Dionisia, is her next heir, and was aged 
22 years in the feast of the Conception of the Blessed Mary the 
Virgin last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Edward I, No. 2. 



giame)2i ne la ^^launclie ann iHattina. 

~w • • • 

I nC^UlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator atCompton, 
X JQth August, 34 Edward I [1306], of the lands and tenements 
which were of James de la Plaiinche in co. Wilts on the day that 
he died, by the oath of Robert Waunsi, John Tesson, Robert de Cruce, 
Walter de Cruce, William Cerle, John le Taillor, John le Tanwiare, 
Geoff ry de Staunton, John de Hertelegh, Patrick de Molendino, Robert 
le Taillor, and Stephen att Dene, who say that 

The said James de la Plaunche did not hold any lands or tene- 
ments of the King in chief in co. Wilts on the day that he died, 
but he held the manor of Compton, which is of the inheritance of 
Matilda de la Plaunche, wife of the said James, who is surviving, 
which said manor is held oi Andrew de Grimstede by the service of 
half a knight's fee, in which said manor there is a capital messuage 
with a garden, which is worth per annum 13^-. 4c/. ; and one dove- 
cote, which is worth per annum bs. 8d. ; and one water-mill, which 
is worth per annum 13J. ^d. There are there 100 acres of arable 
land, worth per annum ^^s. 4^., price of the acre ^d. ; and 7 acres 
of meadow, which are worth per annum loj. 6d., price of the acre 
iSd. There is pasture there for 16 oxen and 6 cows, which is 
worth per annum 7^. 4^., price of the pasture per head j.^ 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 323 

There are there 3 free tenants, of whom Stephen Hulon holds one 
messuage and one virgate of land to him and his heirs, and pays 
per annum ds. at the 4 principal terms of the year. And Gilbert 
Viring holds as much, and pays per annum %s. at the said terms. 
And Geoffrey Causepe holds as much, and pays as much at the said 
terms. There are there 30 customars, each of whom holds half 
a virgate of land, and pays per annum bs. %d. at the said terms : sum, 
5^ ID. And each of them ought to weed half an acre of corn, and 
the works are worth 7r</., price of the work id. ; and each of them 
ought to reap for 3 half days, and those works are worth 5^., price 
of the work of each id. besides reprise, who ought to take of the 
lord half a quarter of barley, one sheep or \id., and one cheese 
price 3</. And each of them ought to raise the lord's hay for 
3 half-days, and those works are worth 7^. 6</., price of each work ^d. 
And each of them ought to work every day from the feast of 
St. Peter which is called Advincula, up to the feast of St. Michael, 
except Sundays and feast days, and they are estimated at 35 days* 
work, and are worth 65J., price of the work ^d. There are there 
3 customars, each of whom holds as much, and they pay per annum 
44^. at the said terms for all service. Also 3 cottars, who pay per 
annum 28^. lod. at the said terms. The pleas and perquisites of 
the Court are worth per annum is. 

Sum-total, £ii 19^. s^d., of the which there is owing to the lord 
of Bereford 20J., to Andrew de Grimslede 15^., to Hugh Wake 6d., 
to Thomas de Pulton td., and to the Abbesse of Shaflon id., and so 
the value of the manor per annufn is ^21 3^. ^^d. 

The said Matilda is aged 21 years and more. 

John, son of the said James, is his next heir, and is aged 5 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Edward I, No. 36. 



C^e abbot anti Content of ©itie nejct mintom 

I nnUlSltlOn taken before the escheator at Chiseldene, 

X i8th July, 34 Edward I [1306], by the oath oi John Jonkin, 

John son of William, William de la More, John de Ponte, Henry le 

Saucer, Elias Bide, Thomas Digon, Walter le Jonge, Nicholas Par/et, 

Walter Styve, William Godard, and Roger de Thomhull, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 

King should grant to the Abbot and Convent of Hide next Wtnton 

that they may have again and hold to them and their successors 



324 Wiltshire 

for ever one messuage, 2 virgates of land, one acre of wood, and 
zs. of rent in Chiseldene, which they acquired to themselves in fee 
of Agnes de Cardeville, without the licence of the King, after the 
statute published concerning lands and tenements not to be put to 
mortmain. 

The said messuage, land, wood, and rent are held of the Abbot 
oi Hide by the service of 15^. lod. per annum, and are worth per 
annum, clear, 31J. There is no other mean between the King and 
the said Agnes except the said Abbot. No lands or tenements 
remain to the said Agnes besides the said gift and assignment. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Edward I, File 58, No. 6. 



iSeginalD De ^ancto iHartino* 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Newport, in the Isle of Wight, before 
A the King's escheator, 13th April, 34 Edward I [1306], if it 
be to the damage of the King or others if the King should grant 
to Reginald de Sancto Martino that he may enfeoff John Auther of 
his manor in Alvyngton, which is held of the King in chief, to hold 
to the said John and his heirs for ever, by the oath of Geoffrey 
Sweyn, etc. 

There remained to the said Reginald certain lands and tenements 
in Dene, in co. Wilts, which are held of the King in chief by 
barony, and are worth per annum, clear, \oos. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Edward 1, File 58, No. 15. 



T • • • 

I n.qUlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator at Kynge- 
X ston Russel, i6th August, 34 Edward I [1306], if it be to the 
damage of the King or others if the King should grant to William 
Russel that he may give his manor of Kyngeston, in co. Dorset, 
which is held of the King in chief as it is said, to Nicholas de Mortes- 
thorn and Nicholaa his wife for their lives .... by the oath 
of William de Sarum, etc., etc. 

There remains to the said William in co. Wilts the manor of 
Estbedewynde, which is held of the King in chief by barony, and 
it is worth per annum, clear, £\o. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Edward I, File 58, No. 20. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 325 

3|o]^n i5on of iBeginalD* 

T • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn taken at Stanton before the King's escheator, 

X ist February, 34 Edward I [1306], by the oath o{ John Ace, 
Robert de Lusteshull, Henry de Stamford, James Arnold, Thomas le 

]^ite, John Ede, Peter de Valecote, Thomas Juliane, Ralph Alex- 
ander, William Botild, Richard de Stapeljord, and James le Lang, who 
say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King should grant to John son of Reginald that he may enfeoflf 
Herbert son of John son of Reginald of his manor of Stantone, to 
hold to him and his heirs of the King and his heirs by the services 
thereof due and accustomed for ever ; and to the said Herbert that 
he, having full seisin thereof, may demise and grant the said manor 
to the said John^ to hold for his whole life, so that after the death 
of the said John it may wholly revert to the said Herbert and his 
heirs, to hold of the King and his heirs by the said services 
for ever. 

The said manor is held of the King in chief by the service of 
the moiety of one knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, ;^io. 
Besides the said enfeoffment no lands or tenements remain to 
the said John, except the lands and tenements in Denas, Elen- 
levenich, and Talgard, in Wales, which the said John holds of the 
King in chief by barony, and which are worth per annum, clear, 

;^200. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 34 Edward I, File 59, No. 3. 



Cl^e abbot of Cetx)fee0burt anti 3!o]&n tie 
^ancto amanno* 

Pleas at Westminster before R. de Hengham and his fellows, justices 
of the Bench, of the term of Holy Trinity, 34 Edward I [1306]. 

The jury come to recognize whether one messuage and 
2 carucates of land in Asshton next Cryckelade are free 
alms belonging to the church of Asshton next Cryckelade, whereof 
the Abbot of Tewkesbury is parson, or the lay fee of John de Sancto 
Amando, whom Alianora, M'ife of Robert de Keynes, who elsewhere 
by default of the said Robert de Keynes was admitted to defend her 

2 2 * 



326 Wiltshire 

right of the said tenements, called to warranty, and who warranted 
her, and thereupon says that a certain Gerard, sometime Abbot, 
predecessor, etc., was seised of the said tenements as of the right 
of his said church in the time of peace, in the time of the lord 
King Richard, kinsman of the now King, who in the same time 
alienated those tenements, etc. And John by his attorney comes, 
and elsewhere calls thereof to warranty the said Robert de Kaynes, 
who now comes by his attorney and warrants him, and says nothing 
why the jury should remain to be taken, except only because the 
said tenements are not free alms, etc., but a lay fee, etc., therefore 
let the jury be taken, but it is respited until the day of St. Martin 
in 15 days, unless Peter Malorr first, etc., for default of the jury 
because none came. Therefore the sheriff shall have their bodies, 
etc. Afterwards, the process being continued up to the day of 
St. Martin in 15 days, 34 Edward I [1305], the parties came by 
their attorneys, and Peter Malorr, before whom, etc., and he sent 
the record of the verdict of the said jury here in these words. 
Afterwards, before P. Malorr, at Devizes, there being associated 
with him William Harden, knight, on Monday next before the 
feast of St. Bartholomew the Apostle, in the 24th year of the now 
King, came the said Abbot and the said Robert by their attorneys, 
and likewise the jury chosen by consent of the parties, who say that 
The said messuage and 2 carucates of land are free alms be- 
longing to the church of Asshton next Cryckelade, whereof the 
said Abbot is parson, and not the lay fee of Robert de Keynes, and 
that Gerard, formerly Abbot of Tezvkesbury, predecessor of the now 
Abbot, was seised of the said tenements as in right of his church 
of Asshton next Cryckelade, in the time of King Richard, who at 
that time alienated those tenements to a certain Walter de Wyke and 
Idonia his wife. And because there is presumption of collusion 
before arranged against the statute of the King, etc., for that the 
said Robert in pleading said nothing why the jury should remain, it 
is asked of the jury if there be any collusion prearranged between 
the said now Abbot and the said Robert, or any of the other tenants 
of the said tenements against the statutes of the King, lest the 
lands or tenements, etc. They say no. Therefore it is considered 
that the said Abbot shall recover his seisin thereof against the said 
Robert and Alianora, and the said Alianora shall have of the land 
of the said John to the value of the said tenements, and the said 
John shall have of the land of the said Robert de Keynes to the 
value of the said tenements. And the said Robert in mercy. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 34 Edward /, No. 183. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 327 



Eobert De ftatnejs. 

TT • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Wynfred Newborgh, before the 

X King's escheator, i8th May, 34 Edward I [1306], if it be to 
the damage of the King or others if the King should grant to 
Robert de Caynes that he may give to William de Kaynes one 
messuage, 2 carucates of land, 60 acres of meadow, and 100 acres 
of wood, in Combe Kaynes, which are held of the King in chief 
as it is said, and which Hawisia, who was the wife of Robert de 
Caynes, holds in dower of the inheritance of the said Robert, and 
which after the death of the said Hawisia ought to revert to the 
said Robert, to hold to the said William and his heirs after the 
death of the said Hawisia of the King and his heirs for ever, or not, 
by the oath of Adam Karang, etc., etc. 

There remains to the said Robert in co. Wilts one messuage 
and one carucate of land in Cheleworth, which are held of the 
King in chief by the service of keeping the King's forest of Bradene, 
and they are worth per annum, clear, \oos. ; also one messuage 
and 2 carucates of land in Puriton, which are held of the Abbot 
and convent of Malmesbury, by what services the jurors know not, 
and are worth per annum, clear, £'i.o\ and one messuage and 
2 carucates of land in Asschton, which are held of the Abbot and 
convent of Tewkesbury, by what service is not known, and are 
worth per annum, clear, £\S' 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 34 Edward /, File 62, No. 6. 



milUam be ilJettU ann Crtistma 1^(0 t»ife» 

Inquisition taken before the escheator at Blacwelle, 
5th October, 34 Edward I [1306], of the lands and tenements 
which were of William de Nevylle in co. Wilts on the day that he 
died, by the oath of Philip de Lustushull, Nicholas de Wyle, Peter ate 
Styele, Richard Lovekyn, Philip le Forster, William Farwyne, Richard 
ate Hegge, John ate Mere, William Lit, John Longe, Michael le 
Freman, and Walter le Deveneys, who say that 

William de Nevill and Cristina his wife, jointly enfeoffed by 
Nicholas de Nevill, held on the day that the said William died the 
manor of Blakareswell, in Whyteparisch, in the said county, of 



328 Wiltshire 

Richard le Engleis, by the service of 5^. per annum for all service, 
which said William and Cristina peaceably continued their seisin 
thereof from the time of the said enfeoffment up to the death of 
the said William. 

There is in the said manor one capital messuage with a close 
adjoining, and it is worth per annum 3^. 

There are in the demesne 80 acres of arable land, which are 
worth per annum 20J., price of the acre -^d. Also 6 acres of 
meadow, which are worth per annum 7^. bd., price of the acre i^d. 
And the pasture there is worth per annum \id. 

There are there 6 free tenants, of whom Peter ate Stile holds 
7 etcres of arable land, and pays per annum 6d. in the feast of 
St. Michael. Philip Forester holds 9 acres of land, and pays per 
annum in the feast of Easter 6d. Alice Carteres holds one messuage 
and one acre of land, and pays per annum 6d. at Easter and 
Michaelmas. John Hamelin holds one messuage and one acre of 
land, and pays per annum bd. at tlie said terms. Agnes Randolf 
holds one messuage and the fourth part of one acre of land, and 
pays per annum at Michaelmas \d. John Yue holds one messuage 
and 3 acres of land, and pays per annum \%d. at the said 2 terms. 

Sum of the rents of the free tenants, 3^. t\d. 

He held o( John son of William 12 acres of pasture by the service 
of IS. per annum, and they are worth nothing besides that service. 
The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum 18^. 

Sum-total, 36X. 6^«/., whereof there is owing to Richard le Engleis 
5J. per annum, and to John son of William zj., and so the manor is 
worth, clear, per annum, 29J. b\d. 

Nicholaa and Alice, daughters of the said William, are his next 
heirs. The said Nicholaa is aged 8 years, and the said Alice 4 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 16. 



jDionijSia Ue i^ellington of CjSjsejc. 

IT • • • 

I nC[UlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
X Dionisia de Hellingtone, of Essex, made before the King's 
escheator at Marleberge, 9th March, i Edward II [1308], by the 
oath of Robert Burdun, Richard le Berner, William Durdaunt, John 
Potent, Geoffrey Gustard, John atte Merhsmulle, Richard Atte Watere, 
John Clarice, John Atte melle de Rosteshale, Reginald le Forester, John 
Midewynter, and Edmund Chese, who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 329 

The said Dionisia held in her demesne as of fee on the day that 
she died certain tenements in Wodebergh of the King in chief, by 
the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee, viz., one capital 
messuage, the easement whereof is worth per annum \id., and 
50 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 25^., price of 
the acre 6^/., and 4 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 
%s.y price of the acre zs. There is there a certain pasture in 
common, which is worth per annum 35. \d. There is there of rent 
of assize of 4 customars 12J. per annum, to be taken at the 4 
principal terms of the year equally. The works of the same are 
worth per annum 22^. 

All the said tenements remained in the King's hand after the 
death of the said Dionisia until now. She died on the day of 
Pentecost, 28 Edward I [1300]. 

William, son of the said Dionisia, is her next heir, and is aged 
24 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward II, No. 70. 



I^eter ne la ^\x%t. 

In(][UlSl tlOn taken before the King's escheator at Chyppen- 
ham, 24th February, 35 Edward I [1307], of the lands and 
tenements of the which Peter de la Huse, who held of the King in 
chief, was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died, 
by the oath of John de la Mare, knight, William de Myddelhope, 
knight, Thomas de Pedeworth, Robert Selyman, Robert de Hatte, William 
Pykeryng, Richard Ive, Waller Willame, William de Budestone, John 
Kaynel, Robert le Whyte, and John le Chapman, who say that 

The said Peter held the manor of Roudon of the King in chief 
in fee farm on the day that he died, by the service of paying there- 
for by the year £-1 loj., which said farm is assigned by the King 
to the now Queen. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden and 
curtilage, and it is worth per annum 4J. ; also a dovecote which is 
worth per annum 2^. : sum, bs. 

There are there in the demesne 50 acres of arable land, which 
are worth per annum \zs. bd., price of the acre ^d. ; and 50 acres 
of land, which are worth per annum 8j. \d., price of each acre zd. ; 
also 24 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 36^., price of 



330 Wiltshire 

each acre \%d. There is there a certain several pasture, which is 
worth per annum 6j. %d. : sum, 63X. bd. 

There are there 5 free tenants, who pay per annum 43J. at the 
4 principal terms of the year by equal portions ; also 4 tenants of 
another condition, viz. small sokemen, who pay per annum 53^. \d. 
at the said terms; also 37 cottars in the town of Chyppenham 
belonging to the said manor of Roudon, who pay per annum 
£\ 9X. 3^. at the said terms : sum, £(^ 5^. id. 

There are there 7 customars, each of whom holds one messuage 
and 5 acres of land, and they pay altogether of rent of assize 
1 5 J. bd. at the said 4 terms. And they shall give at the feast of 
St. Martin to the lord's larder 5^. b\d., and each of them shall give 
at the same feast one cock and 3 hens, price of each \d. And they 
ought to weed the lord's corn always on the second day after 
dinner after the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and 
those works are worth at that time ^d. And each of them ought 
to reap in the Autumn each working day half an acre of corn, and 
shall have the thirteenth sheaf if the lord will, but if not, each of 
them shall give at the feast of St. Michael 3</. : sum, 25J, %\d. 

There are there 2 water-mills, which are worth per annum 
66j. %d.\ also 2 fulling-mills, which are worth per annum loj. 
There is there a certain fishing in the Avon for eels about the 
feast of St. Michael, and it is worth zs. : sum, 78^. %d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the courts are worth per annum 
lox. : sum, loj. 

Sum of the whole value of the said manor by the year, £\%(^s. sW-t 
out of which there is paid to the Queen per annum ^7 10s., and so 
the said manor is worth per annum, clear, ^10 igs. 5J</. 

Pe/er de la Huse, son of the said Peter de la Huse, is his next heir, 
and is aged 21 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 30. 



OBogo De Cnotrle* 



nqUlSltlOn taken at Dicherygge the 3rd day of August, 

35 Edward I [1307], before William Mounte, sub-escheator of 

the lord the King in co. Wilts, of the lands and tenements which 

Bogo de Cnovyle held of the King in chief, by the oath of John de 

Bourle, Dauid Lovel, Waller Welleme, Robert de Hatte, Henry Willeme, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 331 

John de Hulk, Walter Beauvylayn, Henry Poyntel, John atte Worm- 
herde, Walter atte Slade, William le Whyte, and John Plecy, who 
say that 

Bogo de Cnovyle held on the day that he died the manor of 
Dicherygge of the King by reason of the lands which were of 
Roger le Bigod, formerly Marshall of England, being in the King's 
hands, by the service of half a knight's fee, except the fifth part, 
and it is of the inheritance of Joan, who was the wife of Bogo de 
Cnovyle, deceased. 

The capital messuage with the garden, curtilages, and easements 
is worth zs. There are there 140 acres of arable land, each acre 
whereof is worth per annum ^d. ; also 5 acres of meadow, each of 
which is worth per annum 18^. ; also 4 acres of wood, each whereof 
is worth per annum td. There is there one water-mill, and it is 
worth per annum sj. : sum, 51J. td. 

Of the tenants of the manor Adam de Alecombe holds one messuage 
and half a virgate of land, half an acre of meadow, and i^ acres of 
wood, for the -which he owes suit at the hundred of Bisshoppeston, 
to acquit the manor of Dicherygge, and he pays nothing else by 
the year except ward if it shall happen. 

John de Henle holds one messuage and 3 acres of land, and pays 
per annum \id. at the feasts of the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary and St. Michael by equal portions. 

William Schoyere holds one messuage and 10 acres of land, and 
one plot of meadow, and pays per annum 55. at the said terms. 

Cristina Cole holds one messuage and 7 acres of land, and pays 
per annum is. $d. at the said terms. 

Juliana Schoyere holds one messuage, and pays per annum 1 od. 
at the said terms. 

Matilda, daughter of Agnes, holds one cottage, and pays per 
annum lod. at the said terms. 

Cristina la Tayllours holds one messuage with a curtilage, and 
pays per annum 3^-. 8</. at the said terms. 

William Pylkes holds one messuage with a curtilage and 2 acres 
of land, and pays per annum is. at the said terms. 

Emma de Alecoumbe holds one messuage, and pays per annum 
lid. at the said terms. Sum, ibs. <)d. 

Sum-total, 68^. ^d. 

Bogo, son of Bogo de Cnovyle, is the next heir of the said Bogo, 
and is aged 30 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edivard I, No. 42. 



22,2 Wiltshire 



Inquisition taken before the King's escheator at Wilton, 
25th ]\.'ay, 35 Edward I [1307], of the lands and tenements 
of the which John Bysei, who held of the King in chief, was seised 
in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died, by the oath of 
John Sluhard, John Marty n, William le Dun, Henry k Frye,. William 
le Yonge, Gtojfrey Caucepe, Waller Warde, Walter Thomas, John Elys, 
Robert Atte Cruch, Walter Serle, and William Serle, who say that 

Combe. 

The said John Byset held the moiety of the manor of Combe 
next Salisbury, in co. Wilts, of the King in chief, by the service of 
the ninth part of one knight's fee. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, which 
are worth per annum \%d. There are there 80 acres of land, which 
are worth per annum zos., price of each acre id. ; also 6 acres of 
meadow, which are worth per annum gj., price of each acre \%d. 
Sum of the said demesnes, ^os. 6d. 

There are there 4 free tenants, of whom Thomas le Chamherlayn 
pays per annum iid. at the feast of St. Michael for all service, 
saving suit at court at the two law days. Richard le Rede pays per 
annum bs. %d. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions. John Faber pays by the year 5^. at the said terms. 
William Faber pays by the year \zd: at the said terms. Sum, 
13J. %d. 

There are there 14 customars, of whom Thomas Cut holds 20 acres 
of land, and pays per annum at the said 4 terms bs. ^d. by equal 
portions. John Atte Chyrch holds 20 acres of land, and pays per 
annum at the said terms bs. 9</. Alice la Crases holds 20 acres of 
land, and pays per annum at the said terms bs. 8d. Walter Atte 
Cruch holds 20 acres of land, and pays per annum bs. gd. at the 
said terms. Peter le Dekne holds 20 acres of land, and pays per 
annum bs. bd. at the said terms. Agnes la Pope holds 20 acres of 
land, and pays per annum at the said terms bs. \d. Henry le 
Hayward holds 20 acres of land, and pays per annum at the said 
terms bs. %d. John Govayre holds 20 acres of land, and pays per 
annum at the same terms qs. \d. Richard le Knave holds 20 acres 
of land, and pays per annum at the same terms bs. ^d. Nicholas 
Bernard holds 14 acres of land, and pays by the year at the said 
terms bs. ^d. John Huberd holds 14 acres of land, and pays per 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 333 

annum at the said terms 6j. \d. Richard le Brod holds 14 acres of 
land, and pays per annum at the said terms bs. ^d. William le 
Shephurd holds 14 acres of land, and pays by the year at the same 
terms 6j. ^d. William le Duhhere holds 14 acres of land, and pays 
per annum at the said terms bs. 3^. And each of them shall do 
between the gule of August and the feast of St. Michael 32 
manual works, to wit, each work of the value of \d. 

There are there 3 cottars, of whom Thomas Ammory holds 5 acres 
of land, and pays per annum at the said 4 terms 40^^. by equal 
portions. Agnes Balryches holds 2 acres of land, and pays per 
annum at the said terms 15^. Gilbert le Pottere holds 2 acres of 
land, and pays per annum at the same terms zs. And each of the 
said 3 cottars shall work like one of the said customars. And 
the said Thomas Ammory and Gilbert le Pottere shall each give at 
the feast of St. Martin one cock and 3 hens. And the said Agnes 
shall give one cock and one hen, price of each cock \d. and of each 
hen \\d. Sum of the rent of the said customars with chersete, 
£i, \%s. i\d. 

Sum of the value of the works of the same, 22^. %d. 

There are there 5 cottars of another condition, of whom John le 
Tayllor holds one cottage, and pays per annum at the said terms 
\%d. by equal portions. William Faber holds one cottage, and 
pays by the year 40^/. Agnes Denyse and Edward le Glut hold and 
pay as much. Richard le Forster holds .... and pays per 
annum at the said terms 4 J. : sum, i5.r. bd. 

There is there the moiety of one water-mill, and it is worth per 
annum 4^. The pleas and perquisites of the courts for .... 
of St. John with two law days are worth per annum half a mark : 
sum, los. Sd. 

Sum of the whole value of the said manor by the year, £g iis. 3^</., 
of the which there is paid to the sheriff per annum 4^., and so the 
said manor is worth per annum, clear, £g 7J. $id. 

Stapelham. 

The said /ohn died seised in his demesne as of fee of one 
messuage and 33 acres of land . . . ol John de Wroxale, in 
Stapelham, by the service of paying per annum i lb. of pepper at 
the feast of St. Michael. The said messuage is worth per annum 
lid., and the said 33 acres are worth per annum 8^. 3</., price of 
each acre $d. He held of Robert de la Hyde in the same way 
10 acres of land by the service of paying per annum b\d., which 
are worth per annum 2^-. bd., price . . . He held also in 



334 Wiltshire 

the same way of Adam . . .'4 acres of land, paying nothing 
therefor, which are worth per annum iid., price of each acre ^d. 

Sum of the value of the said tenements by the year, izs. ()d., of 
the which he shall pay to the said John de Wroxale i lb. of pepper, 
price izd., and to the said Robert de la Hyde . . . ^d., and 
to a certain William de la Hurne for the term of his life . . . 
each year, from whom he acquired the said tenements, and there- 
fore no . . . shall happen to the said tenements while the 
said William de la Hurne lives. 

John B . . . 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 43. 



Inquisition taken before the King's escheator at Were- 
ministre, 27th May, 35 Edward I [1307], of the lands and 
tenements of the which John Byset, who held of the King in chief, 
was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died, by 
the oath oi John de Bratton, William Blaunchard, Reginald le Theyn, 
William le Palmer, John Ennok, Philip de Northjolk, John le Fenge, 
Roger Colerych, Thomas Bytheclyve, John le Palmere, John Atlelese, 
and John le . . . volyller, who say that 

The said John was seised in his demesne as of fee of 2 carucates 
of land in Chapel Asshtone on the day that he died, which 2 
carucates he held in free socage of the Abbess of Romesey, by the 
service of paying by the year 40J., and doing suit at her court from 
3 weeks to 3 weeks. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, which 
are worth per annum zs. Also there are there 80 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum 205'., price of each acre 3</. ; also 
3^ acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 5 J. 3</., price of 
each acre i^d. ; and 4 acres of several pasture, which are worth 
per annum \bd., price of each acre ^d. : sum, 28^. "jd. 

There are there 8 free tenants, of whom Nicholas Stake pays per 
annum at the feast of St. Michael 3^. Richard de Bosco pays at 
the same feast zs., and owes suit at court. Thomas le Theyn pays 
per annum at the said feast i zd., and owes suit. William Testwode 
pays at the said feast 45-. dd., and owes suit. John le Jeojne pays at 
the said feast 35. bd., and owes suit, and shall give at the feast of 
St. Martin for the pannage of his pigs, whether he shall have pigs 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 335 

or not, id. Roger le Sauser pays at the feast of St. Michael 3^., 
and owes suit. William Atkstone pays at the same feast -]s. c)d., 
and owes suit. And Richard Rudeman pays per annum at the said 
feast 3 J., and owes suit : sum, 275. i \d. 

There are there 4 customars, viz., Walter Wyllyng, John Atte 
Pleysted, Matilda Busye, and John Chykled, each of whom holds 
half a virgate of land, and pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Michael 3^., and each of them shall give at the same feast for 
his autumnal works and other works imposed throughout the whole 
year a certain sum for cert money \_adcertum'], in money is. ; and 
each of them shall give at the feast of St. Martin one cock and 

3 hens of chersete, for the which they shall dine with the lord on 
the day of" the Nativity of the Lord, each of them with his wife, 
and it is worth nothing more. 

There are also there 7 customars of another condition, of whom 
Roger le Cariere holds 6 acres of land, and pays per annum at the 

4 principal terms by equal portions ^s. Ralph le Combere holds and 
pays like the said Roger. William le Mol holds 4 acres of land, 
and pays per annum at the feast of St. Michael 2s. ^d., and he 
shall go as a messenger of the lord 4 or 5 times per annum for 
one day, if the lord shall wish, at his proper cost, and the service 
is worth per annum id., and he shall carry the lord's hay once in 
the year after dinner, and that work is worth id. Henry le Irysshe 
holds 2 acres of land, and pays per annum at the said term of 
St. Michael i8(/., and shall do all other things like the said William 
le Mol. Walter At testy ghel holds 2 acres of land, and pays per 
annum at the said term 16^., and shall do other things like the 
said William le Mol. Agnes Smereval holds 2 acres of land, and 
pays per annum at the said term 22^., and shall do other things 
like the said William le Mol. Walter le Lange holds 2 acres of land, 
and pays per annum at the said term i%d., and shall do other 
things like the said William le Afol. John Danyd holds 2 acres of 
land, and pays per annum at the said term 2^., and shall do other 
things like the said William le Mol. Nicholas Dalcby holds one 
cottage with a curtilage, and pays per annum at the said term \bd., 
and shall do other things like the said William le Mol. Nicholas 
Trendel holds one acre of land, and pays per annum at the said 
term is., and shall carry the lord's hay for half a day, and that 
work is worth \d. Margery la ]\foderlese holds one messuage, and 
pays per annum at the said term iid., and shall carry the lord's 
hay like the said Nicholas. Nicholas le Irysshe holds one messuage, 
and pays per annum at the said term 35'., and shall carry the lord's 
corn like the said Nicholas Trendal. Alice Eve holds one messuage. 



^^6 Wills hire 

and pays per annum at the said term iid., and shall carry the hay 
like the said Nicholas. And each of them shall give chersete, and 
shall dine like one of the said 4 customars, and the profit is worth 
in profit nothing more. And all the said customars shall give at 
the feast of St. Michael in the name of tallage half a mark. Sum 
of the rent of the said customars, with tallage, 47^^. 6d. Sum of 
the value of the works and services of the Same, gj. ']\d. 

There is there a certain wood containing 5 acres, and the 
underwood of each acre is worth per annum \d. : sum, lod. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth per annum 6d. 
Sum of the whole value of the said 2 carucates of land per annum, 
1 15J. g^d., of the which he shall pay to the Abbess of Romesye \os., 
and so the said 2 carucates of land are worth per annum, clear, 
7 5 J. g^d. 

John Byset, son of the said John Byset, is his next heir, and was 
aged 5 years at the feast of Easter last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 43. 



iRogcr le 'Brgon, cEarl of iQorfolfi. 

EXlGnt of the knight's fees and advowsons of churches 
which were o{ Roger le Bygod, formerly Earl o{ Norfolk and 
Marshall of England, who held of the King in chief in co. Wilts, 
on the day that he died, and which by reason of his death are 
taken into the King's hands, made before the King's escheator at 
Upavene, 29th May, 35 Edward I [1307], by the oath of William 
Grandyn, William de Bodeford, John Edmond, Thomas Ruddok, Philip 
Malewayn, William Malewayn, John le WolJ, Richard le Chaundeler, 
Geoffrey Moryz, Peter de Ore, John Claryce, John de Molend of 
Rusteshal, Robert Bordon, Robert Nondy, Ralph Atte Berne, William 
le Eyr, John Grygge, John de Somersete, John de Kepehull, Thomas 
Boueclyve, Philip le Clerk, John de Nutheraven, John Sylle, and 
Richard le Frenshe, who say that 

Matilda de Barevyle, William Martyn, and others hold 2 virgates 
of land in Gotacre of the fee of Roger le Bygod, formerly Earl of 
Norjolk and Marshall of England, by the service of the tenth part 
of one knight's fee when scutage shall run, and it is worth per 
annum, according to the true value, los. 

Peter de Breouse, by Agnes Husee his wife, holds half a knight's 
fee of the fee of the said Earl in North Tudeworth, doing therefor 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 337 

scutage when it shall run, and the said half fee is worth, according 
to the true value of the same, £\o. 

Elizabeth de Pedewardyn and John her son hold half a knight's 
fee of the fee of the said Earl in Clyvewancy, doing therefor 
scutage when it shall run for half a fee, and it is worth per annum, 
according to the true value thereof, 40^'. 

John Joukyn, jun., holds in Brodestone of the fee of the said 
Earl the fourth part of one knight's fee, doing therefor scutage 
when it shall run for the fourth part of one feip, and it is worth 
per annum ros. 

Thomas Parys holds in the marsh of the fee of the said Earl the 
fourth part of one knight's fee, doing therefor socage when it 
shall run for the fourth part of one fee, and it is worth per 
annum 20J. 

John Bluet holds in Helmerton of the fee of the said Earl one 
knight's fee, doing therefor scutage when it shall run for one ' 
knight's fee, and it is worth per annum looj. 

The same John holds in Lakham of the fee of the said Earl 
one knight's fee, doing therefor scutage when it shall run for one 
knight's fee, and it- is worth per annum 6oj. 

The said Earl, had no advowsons of churches in co. Wilts. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 46. 



Sloan, ttjife of d^ilbert tie Clare, €wc\ of 
(13louce0ter ann 8)ertforD» 

Inquisition taken before the King's escheator at Hegh- 
tredebury, the 2nd day of June, 35 Edward I [1307], of the 
lands and tenements which were of Gilbert de Clare, formerly Earl 
of Gloucester and Hertjord, in co. Wilts, on the day that he died, 
and what. lands and tenements after the enfeoffment which the 
King made to the said Earl and to Joan his wife, daughter of 
the lord the King, of the said lands, by right of inheritance 
descended to the heir of the said Earl, or happened by escheat or 
any other way, by the oath oi Elias de Hulk, John Chynnok, John 
Strug, Philip le Cok, John de Depejord, William de Tuderynton, 
Arnulph Dugholf, Godjrey de Meere, John Sylvestre, John le Carpenter, 
Robert Vygorus, and Robert Swotyng, who say that 

There happened to the heir of the said Earl 2 carucates of 
land in Heghtredebury after the said enfeoflfment, by the death of 

WILTS. INQ.—YOL, U. 2 2 

2 3 



S^S Wiltshire 

a certain Richard de Weston, who held them of the said Earl for the 
term of his life, and the said Earl held them of the King in chief 
as a member belonging to the honor of Gloucester, but by what' 
service the jurors do not kncfw. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden and 
curtilage, and they are worth per annum 5^. ; also a dovecote, 
which is worth per annum 4J. There are there 306 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum 102s., price of each acre 4^/. ; 
also 16 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 24J., price of 
each acre \%d. ; also 2 several pastures, which are worth per 
annom 30J. There is there a certain small grove at Hornyngesham, 
the profit whereof as in underwood and herbage is worth per 
annum <,s. Sum of the demesnes, £% los. 

There are there 7 free tenants, of whom John Chynnok pays at 
the feast of Easter 3^. ; Edward Luddok pays at Easter and the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist 5^. in equal portions ; Emma Cosyn 
pays at the same terms 2d. \ John Bjyboys pays per annum at the 
4 principal terms of the year 2s. ; Walter Bovetone pays per annum 
at the said terms 2s. ; John jRussel pays per annum at the said 
terms 6s. ; and /ohn Sheve pays per annum at the said terms ^od. 
Sum of the rents of the said free tenants, i%s. qd. 

There are there 1 1 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate 
of land and pays per annum at the 4 principal terms of the year 
by equal portions ss. for their services and works put at a certain 
sum in money. And each of them shall give at the feast of 
St. Martin one cock and 3 hens of custom which is called chersete, 
price of each id. 

There are there 5 cottars, each of whom pays per annum at the 
4 principal terms of the year by equal portions 2^-. ; also 2 cottars, 
each of whom pays per annum at the said terms i6d., and each of 
them shall carry the hay for one day after dinner, and that work 
is worth ^d. 

There are at Hornyngesham 8 cottars, who pay per annum in 
the whole at the said 4 terms 15^. /\.d. And each of them shall 
give chersete like one of the said customars. Sum of the rents of 
the said customars, £^ 3J. Sum of the customs and services 
of the same 6s. ^\d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the Court are worth per annum 2^. 

Sum of the value of the said 2 carucates of land by the year, 
£1^ OS. i^d. 

Gilbert de Clare, son of the said Earl, is his next heir, and is 
aged 18 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 47 {pari i). 



Inguisitiones Post Mortem. 339 

gioan, tDife of dD^ilbert Ue Clare, Carl of 
d^louceister anD 5)ertforD» 

T • • • 

I nC^UlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator atUpavene, 
X 29th May, 35 Edward I [1307], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Gilbert de Clare, formerly Earl of Gloucester and 
Hertford, in co. Wilts, on the day that he died, and what lands and 
tenements after the enfeoffment which the King made to the said 
Earl and to Joan his wife, the King's daughter, of the said lands 
and tenements descended to the heir of the said Earl by right of 
inheritance, or happened by escheat or any other way, by the oath 
of John Grygge, John de Somersete, John de Kepehulle, Thomas 
Boveclyve, Stephen de Suthcot, Thomas de Hurle, John Hamelyn, 
William de Boys, Richard Gervays, John Burgoyllon, John de Mulecot, 
and John Mychel, who say that 

The said Earl held the manor of Wexcombe, together with the 
hundred of Kynewardestone, of the King in chief on the day that 
he died by the service of paying per annum to the said King at his 
Exchequer each year £ii. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden and 
a certain small grove adjoining which are worth per annum \%s. 
There are there 300 acres of arable land which are worth per 
annum iooj., price of each acre \d. ; also 18 acres of meadow 
which are worth per annum 27J., price of each acre \%d. There is 
a certain several pasture for oxen and cows which is worth per 
annum 20J,, and a certain other pasture for sheep which is worth 
per annum 20^. Sum of the said demesnes, £,% igj. 

There are there 1 2 free tenants, of whom Robert Hommeden pays 
per annum at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions 
30J. 6rf. William de Stock pays per annum at the said terms \is. (>d. 
Henry le Betere pays per annum at the said terms $s. Robert Beneyt 
pays per annum at the said terms is. bd. John de Haveryng pays 
per annum at the said terms zs. td. Adam de Stock pays per annum 
at those terms zod. Gilbert de Farndone pays per annum at Easter 
and the feast of St. Michael \zs. William Lyllebon pays per annum 
at Michaelmas 20^. William de Stanbrygg pays per annum at the 
said terms 6j. %d. A certain tenement at Paskemere pays per 
annum at the same term %s, William le Prute pays per annum at 
the said term 6d. Roger de Hardene pays per annum at the said 
term zs. Sum of the rents of the said free tenants, £(i ly. \od. 



340 Wiltshire 

There are there 15 virgators in Wexcomb and Wultone, belonging 
to the said manor, who pay per annum £t ^s. at the 4 principal 
terms of the year by equal portions, and each of the said virgators 
shall do between the gule of August and the feast of St. Michael 
32 manual works which are worth is. Sd., price of each work id. 
Sum of the rents of the said customars, £6 ^s. Sum of the value 
of the works of the same per annum, 66s. 2d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the said manor of Wexcomb are 
worth per annum 40X. 

There is also there a certain market town which is called 
Bedewynde, which pays per annum of cert rent 46^. g^. at the 
4 principal terms of the year by equal portions. And the toll of 
the same town with Chypynggavel is worth per annum i^s. Sd. 
The pleas and perquisites of the court of the said town are worth 
per annum 20s. Sum, £4. os. 5^. 

There is there the hundred of Kynewardestone belonging to the 
said manor, and it is worth per annum, clear, ;^i5. 

Sum of the whole value of the said manor per annum, £/^.6 ^s. iid., 
of the which there shall be paid to the King at his Exchequer by 
the year £^2, and so the said manor with the said hundred is 
worth per annum, clear, £ij\. 41. iid. 

There happened to the heir of the said Earl 2 carucates of land 
in Burbach after the said feoffment, by the death of a certain £/a, 
formerly Countess of Warwick, who held them of the said Earl of 
Gloucester by knight's service, viz., paying 40X. when scutage 
shall run. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a small [«r] 
adjoining, which are worth per annum half a mark. There are 
there 150 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 50^., 
price of the acre \d. ; also 4 acres of meadow, which are worth by 
the year 6s., price of the acre \M. There is there a certain 
several pasture for oxen, which is worth per annum loj., and a 
certain other several pasture for sheep, which is worth per annum 
half a mark. Sum of the said demesnes, 79^. \d. 

Free Tenants. 

There are moreover there 7 free tenants, of whom Waller Gyffard 
pays per annum at the 4 principal terms of the year, by equal 
portions, i mark. Geoffrey Hoppegras pays per annum at the feasts 
of St. Michael, the Nativity of the Lord, and Pentecost, by equal 
portions, 7^. Geoffrey le Sauvage pays per annum at the feast of 
St. Michael %d., and at the Nativity of the Lord i lb. of wax, price 
bd. John Grygge pays per annum at the feast of St. Michael 1 lb. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 341 

of wax, price bd. William le Calewe pays per annum at the said 
three feasts 3J. John Burgoyllon pays per annum at the said three 
feasts %s. Geoffrey Dol pays per annum at the said terms is, ' Sum 
of the rents of the said free tenants, 36J. 

CUSTOMARS. 

There are there 8 half-virgators, each of whom shall give at the 
said three terms 6j. And each of them shall weed one day in 
the year after dinner, and the work of each one-is worth \d., and 
they shall also go one day in the year to the meadow after dinner, 
and the work of each is worth \d. ; and each of them shall work 
for one day in the Autumn and shall dine with the lord, and the 
work is worth besides the said dinner \d. 

There are there 3 cottars, each of whom shall give at the said 
three terms izd., and each of them shall weed and carry the hay 
like one of the said virgators. 

Sum of the rents of the said customars, 51J. Sum of the value 
of the works of the same, ^\d. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth per annum ^s. 

Sum of the value of the said carucates of land, £% \is. \\d. 

Gilbert de Clare, son of the said Earl, is his next heir, and is 
aged 18 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 35 Edward I, No. 47 impart i). 



€]^e abbe)30 of ^l^afton* 

I nC[UlSltlOn taken at Marloberg before the King's escheator, 
X 28 June, 35 Edward I [1307J, to inquire if it be to the 
damage or prejudice of the King or others if the King shall grant 
to the Abbess of Shafton that she may have again and hold to her 
and her successors 2 virgates of land in Medebirn of his fee which 
she acquired to herself and her house of William Giffard, after the 
publication of our statute concerning lands and tenements not to 
be put to mortmain, without having obtained our licence thereupon, 
or not, etc., etc., by the oath of John de Chilton^ John Russel, John 
son of William, John Attebrigg, Roger de Thornhulle, William Pluk, 
Elias Pride {?), Henry Saucer, Thomas Digon, John Attemulle, John 
Toky, and John Witlok, who say that 

It is not \o the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to the Abbess of Shajton that she may have again 

2 3 * 



342 Wilts kire 

and hold to herself and her house for ever those 2 virgates of land 
in Medeborne which she acquired to herself and her house after 
the publication of the said statute ; which 2 virgates are held of the 
said Abbess in chief by the service of 8j. per annum, by the service 
of carrying the hay for one day to the court of the said Abbess 
in the town of Ludynton, and by the service of carrying the hay 
for one day to the court of the said Abbess in the said town, and 
by the service of carrying the corn for 2 days to the court of the 
said Abbess in the said town, and by the service of ploughing 
4 acres at the winter sowing in the said town. Each day's work 
of carrying is worth 4^., and the ploughing of one acre is worth ^d. 
The said 2 virgates are worth per annum beyond the said rents 
and service loj. \d. clear. The said Abbess is the mean between 
the said William and the lord the King, and no other. No lands 
or tenements remain to the said William beyond the said 2 virgates 
of land which the said Abbess acquired. The said William during 
the time that he held the said land did suit for that land to the 
King's hundred of TornhuUe, and when he did so he gave to be 
released from that suit iid. per annum. The county by reason of 
the acquisition of the said land through the default of the said 
William, will not be charged with a larger payment, because the 
said William was never wont to be put on assizes, juries, or recog- 
nizances when he held the said 2 virgates. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 35 Edward I, File 64, No. 4. 



ClUlUam ^a^nel ann a^argatet l^ijs ttJife. 

Inquisition taken before the King's escheator at Lyttle- 
tone Paynel, 3rd May, 35 Edward I [1307], to inquire if it be 
to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the King 
shall grant to William Paynel that he may exxieoS John de Hehgham, 
parson of the church of Helpestone, and John Loveday^ of his 
manor of Lyttletone, which is held of the King in chief, as it is 
said, to hold to them and their heirs of the King and his heirs, by 
the services therefor due and accustomed for ever, so that the said 
John and John, having full and peaceable seisin thereof, may re- 
enfeoff the said William and Margaret his wife of the said manor, 
to hold to them and the heirs of the said King and his heirs by the 
said services for ever, or not, etc., etc., by the oath oi Richard 
Enok, Geoffrey le Clerk, William de Perham, John de Perham, W"liam 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 343 

Gule, Richard U Eyr, Geoffrey Moryz, Ralph de la Berne, Richard U 
Chaundelyr, William le Clerk, William Carpentar, and John le FogheUr, 
who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to William Paynel that he may enfeoff the said 
John de Heghham and John Loveday of his said manor of Lyttletone, 
to hold to them and their heirs for ever, so that they, having full 
seisin thereof, may re-enfeoff the said William and Margaret his wife 
of the said manor, to hold to them and the heirs of the said William 
for ever. The said manor is held of the King in chief by the 
service of one knight's fee, making yearly for himself and his 
tenants of the said manor the ward of the castle of Dyvyses for the 
service of the said knight's fee, or paying every year for himself 
and his said tenants 20^. at the feast of St. Michael, and it is worth 
per annum, clear, £1$. There remains to the said William, beyond 
the said gift and grant, one carucate of land at Knyghtetone in 
CO. Wilts, which is held of Henry Husee by the service of the fourth 
part of one knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, ;^io. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 35 Edward I, File 64, No. 20. 



T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator at Wylton, 

JL 17th January, 35 Edward I [1307], to inquire if it be to the 
damage or prejudice of the King or others if the King shall grant 
to Edmund Basset that he may retain and have to him and his heirs 
of the King and his heirs, by the services therefor due and accus- 
tomed for ever, the manor of Berewyk St. James, in co. Wilts, 
which is held of the King in chief, as it is said, and which he 
acquired to himself in the fee oi Henry de Lancaster without the 
licence of the lord the King, or not, etc., etc., by the oath of 
Ralph Atte Halle, Adam Bertelot, John de Bakham, John de Lye, 
Thomas Dauheneye, Hugh Hendyman, John de Harleston, Walter 
Perjet, John Kyngman, John de Brademere, jun., Robert Symme, and 
John Codyn, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to the said Edmund that he may retain and have 
to him and his heirs of the King and his heirs by the said services 
the manor aforesaid. The said manor is held of the King in chief 
as a member of the barony of Kynenaresford, which said barony 



344 Wiltshire 

the said Henry de Lancaster holds of the King in chief of the 
inheritance of his wife, but by what service the jurors know not. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, which 
are worth per annum is. ; also a dovecote, which is worth per 
annum 5^. There are there 24 acres of land, which are worth 
per annum %s., price of each acre 4^. ; also 100 acres of superior 
\_prions'\ land, which are worth per annum ibs. 8d., price of each 
acre zd. ; also 8 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 
12s., price of each acre 18^. There is there a certain pasture 
several between Easter and the feast of the Nativity of St. John 
the Baptist, which is worth for the said time 6s. Sd. Sum of the 
said demesnes, 50^^. 4//. 

There is there a certain Alan de Shadewell, who holds freely 
3^ virgates of land, and pays per annum i^s. \d., viz. at the feast 
of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, for all services. The said 
Alan and Laurencia his wife hold there one windmill for the term 
of their lives, and they pay per annum 30J. at the 4 principal 
terms of the year by equal portions. There are there 18 half- 
virgators, who pay per annum "jis. at the said terms. And each of 
the said virgators shall give at the feast of St. Martin one cock and 
3 hens, or ifd. for the same. There are there 2 cottars, who pay 
per annum 4?. at the said terms. 

Sum, £6 5J. 4</., and so the said manor is worth per annum, 
clear, £% i^s. %d. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 35 Edward I, File 65, No. i. 



Eobert^ 0on of laobert EuiSiseU 

I nqUlSltlOn taken before Master John Gerberd, sheriff of 
X. Wilts, at Kingbr', on Thursday next after the feast of the 
Apostles Peter and Paul, 35 Edward I [1307], by the oath of 
William de Wade/ord, William Grandyn, Richard Styve, John Edmund, 
John Brian, John atte Brigge, William atte Nende, Nicholas Parjay, 
John Molendinar\ Nicholas Rachel, John Whytloc, and Nicholas 
Opehull, to inquire if it be to the damage or prejudice of the lord 
the King or others if the King shall grant to Robert, son oi Robert 
Russel, that he may give and assign to the Prior and convent of 
Bradenestok one messuage and one carucate of land in Westocham 
in exchange for one messuage and one carucate of land in Lydyerd 
Mylycent, to hold to them and their successors for ever, or not, 
etc., etc., who say that 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 345 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to Robert, son of Robert Russel, that he may give and 
assign to the Prior and convent of Bradenestoke one messuage 
and one carucate of land in Westocham in exchange for one 
messuage and one carucate of land in Lydyerd Mylycent, to hold 
to them and their successors for ever. 

The said messuage and land in Westocham are held of the said 
Prior and convent of Bradenestoke by the service of 2d. per annum, 
and are worth per annum, clear, \%s. dd. There are two means 
between the King and the said Robert of the said messuage and 
land, viz., the said Prior of Bradenestoke and Edmund de Mortuo 
Mart, and the said Edmund [holds] of the King in chief. The 
messuages and lands which remain to the said Robert Russel, beyond 
the said gift and assignment, are worth per annum 33J. ^d., and 
they suffice to do the customs and services as well for the said 
premises in Westocham so given as for the other lands retained, 
and for all other charges which he sustained or was wont to sustain 
as in suits, views of frankpledge, aids, tallage, vigils, fines, re- 
demptions, contributions, and other charges whatsoever. The said 
Robert may be put on assizes, juries, and other recognisances what- 
soever as he was wont to be put before the said gift. The county 
by the said gift, by the default of the said Robert, will not be 
charged with a larger payment. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 35 Edward I, File 65, No. 9. 



jQicl^olais De ^t. a^aure anti Cba \^x^ tuife. 

InC[UlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator at Pultone, 
7th March, 35 Edward I [1307], to inquire if it be to the 
damage or prejudice of the King or others if the King shall grant 
to Nicholas de St. Maure that he may give and assi_gn his manor of 
Pultone, which is held of the King in chief as it is said, to Walter 
de Skydemor, to hold to him and his heirs of the King and his heirs 
by the services therefor due and accustomed for ever, and that 
the said Walter, having full seisin thereof, may re-enfeoff the said 
Nicholas and Eva his wife of the said manor, to hold to them and 
the heirs of their bodies of the King and his heirs by the said 
services, so that if the said Nicholas and Eva shall die without heirs 
of their bodies the said manor shall wholly remain to the said 
Nicholas and his heirs, to hold to him and his heirs of the King 
and his heirs for ever, or not, etc., etc., by the oath o{ John Yldolf, 



346 Wiltshire 

Thomas atte Hale, Elias le Vyneler, Thomas Gyffard, Roger de 
Wytteneye, Gilbert le Tanner, William Balle, Robert Pernaunt, William 
de Kynegareshegge, Robert Atte Temple, John le Eyr, and William 
Strugoyl, who say that 

It is not to the damage or prejudice of the King or others if the 
King shall grant to the said Nicholas de St. Maure that he may give 
his said manor of Pultone to the said Walter de Skydemor, to hold 
to him and his heirs of the King and his heirs by the services 
therefor due and accustomed, so that the said Walter de Skydemor 
may re-enfeofF the said Nicholas and Eva his wife of the said manor, 
to hold to them and the heirs of their bodies of the King by the 
services aforesaid. 

The said manor of Pultone is held of the King in chief by the 
service of half a knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, 
£iZ 6s. Sd. 

There remains to the said Nicholas, beyond the said grant, 
2 carucates of land at la Rode, in co. Somerset, which are held of 
the Earl of Gloucester by the service of half a knight's fee, and are 
worth per annum, clear, ;^io ; also one carucate of land at Wytten- 
ham, in co. Wilts, which is held of the said Earl by the service of 
the fourth part of one knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, 
100s. ; also the naanor of Nywetone super Mare in Northumberland, 
which is held of the Earl of Lancaster by the service of half a 
knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, £zo; also one carucate 
of land in Kyngestone, in co. Warwick, which is held of William 
de Leye by the service of paying per annum \bs., and is worth per 
annum, clear, 6oj. ; also 2 carucates of land in Bassyngborn, in 
CO. Cambridge, which are held of Warin de Bassyngborn by the 
service of half a knight's fee, and are worth per annum, clear, £\o ; 
also one carucate of land in SchefFeld, in co. Sussex, which is held 
of the Earl o( Lancaster hy the service of the fourth part of one 
knight's fee, and is worth per annum, clear, £6 i ^s. 4<f. 

Chan. Inq. a.q.d., 35 Edward L, File 65, No. 13. 



iRegtnalD De ^rgentem* 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at Cheldryngton before the King's 

jL escheator, 2znd March, 1 Edward II [1308], of the lands and 

tenements which were of Reginald de Argentem, in co. Wilts, how 

much he held of the King in chief, and how much of others, etc.^ 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 347 

etc., by the oath of Henry Tressehare, William le Noble, Philip 
Clericus, Richard . . . , William le Frye^ John Saundres, Robert 
Saundres, Richard Goer, John de Bottokesham, Henry le Blak, John le 
Mayn, and Nicholas de Canejord, who say that 

The said Reginald de Argentem did not hold any lands or tene- 
ments in his demesne as of fee of the King in chief in the said 
county on the day that he died, but he held in his demesne as of 
fee in the said county of Adomar de Valence 10s. of rent to be taken 
by the hands of Warin de Bassingeborn per annum at the feast of 
St. Michael, for the lands and tenements which the said Warin 
holds of the said Reginald in the vill of Cheldryngton. Being 
asked by what service the said Reginald holds the said rent of the 
said Adomar, the jurors say by homage only to be done to the said 
Adomar for the lands and tenements which the said Warin holds in 
the said vill of Cheldryngton. 

John de Argentem, son of the said Reginald, is his next heir, and 
is aged 30 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., i Edward II, No. 41. 



Inquisition taken at Chyppeham, loth Oct., i Edward II 
[1307], before the escheator of the lord the King of co. 
Wilts, to inquire how much land the said Edmund held of the 
King in chief, and how much of others, etc., etc., by the oath of 
William de Midellrop, Henry Atte Boxe, John de la Mare, John de 
Comb, John de Stodleye, Thomas de Peddewrthe, Adam Hardyng, 
William Pertehaye, John de Hokam, Richard de C . . welle, Walter 
Willeine, and William de Budeston, who say that 

Sheldon, Chippenham. 

Edmund Gascelyn held in chief of the King on the day that he 
died the manor of Sheldon and the vill of Chippeham, with the 
hundreds underwritten to the said manor belonging, by the service 
of the fourth part of a knight's fee, and by homage and fealty. 

The capital messuage with the enclosure is worth per annum 
6s. Sd., and the dovecote is worth per annum 2s. There are there 
in the demesne 120 acres of arable land, whereof 60 acres are 
worth per acre $d., and the price of each of the other 60 acres is 
zd. Also of meadow which can be mown 20 acres, and the acre 
is worth by the year iSd. 



348 Wiltshire 

He also held the said hundreds of Chypp[ham], Bissopeston, 
and Dunolewe, wholly with other liberties, which are worth per 
annum loos. Also a certain market with a fair, which is worth 
per annum 60s. 

Adam Hardyng holds divers tenements, for the which he pays 
per annum i8</., viz., at the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed 
Mary 9</., and at the feast of St. Michael 9</. 

John de Bourle holds divers tenements, for the which he pays per 
annum \is. %d. at the terms before written, by equal portions. 

Edmund Hoes holds divers tenements, and pays per annum 
i6.r. M. by equal portions at the said terms. 

John Clericus and Henry Payn hold one tenement, paying per 
annum 2^. id. at the said terms. 

Richard Bolt holds one tenement, paying per annum zs. at the 
said terms. 

John Champion holds one tenement, and pays per annum 4J. td. 
at the said terms by equal portions. 

John Andrew holds one tenement, and pays is. at 2 terms by 
equal portions as above. 

Godjrey Proute holds one messuage, and pays per annum iid. at 
the said terms by equal portions. 

Richard de la Serrie holds one plot, for the which he pays per 
annum at the feast of St. Michael id. 

John le Wayte holds one tenement, and pays per annum at the 
said term \d. 

John atte Barr holds one tenement, and pays \d. at the 2 terms 
before written by equal portions. 

The Abbot de Stanleye holds divers tenements, and pays at the 
feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary ()d., at Easter bd., 
and at the feast of St. Michael 9^., and one girdle with a knife 
price id. 

Richard le Fogeler holds one messuage and 21 acres of land and 
one acre of meadow, for the which he pays per annum is. at the 
4 principal terms by equal portions, and shall give at the feast of 
St. Luke the Evangelist iid. of aid. He ought also to find one 
man to weed the corn every other day after dinner, and the work 
is worth \d. He shall give at the feast of St. Martin one cock and 
3 hens, and they are worth 4^. He ought also once to carry one 
cartload of wood, and the work is worth ^d. ; and to mow half 
an acre of . . . and the ... is worth ^d. ; also to 
wash and shear the lord's sheep and to take nothing, and it is 
worth \d. ; also to find ... to cleanse the beans, and it is 
worth \d. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 349 

John Dosevyle holds and does as much as Richard Fogeler, except 
that he shall only give lold. to the larder. 

Robert le Gogel holds and does like the said Richard, except only 
that he gives to the larder 9^. 

William Steven, Walter Here/ray, Geoffrey Cowel, Symon Atte 
B . . . are of the same tenure, and pay and do in all things 
like Robert Gogel. 

There is there a certain wood in the forest of Pewsham, for the 
which he shall have common in the said forest for all manner of 
beasts, and that common is worth is. Sum of the said manor of 
Chippeham by the year, £1^ 12s. z^d. 

BUDESTON. 

The said Edmund held on the day that he died the vill of 
Budeston of Matilda Buryel at fee farm, paying per annum 20 marks 
at the feast of St. Michael and Easter by equal portions .... 
except wards and marriages when they shall happen, and it is 
worth per annum one year with another bs. Sd. Sum, clear, per 
annum bs. Sd. besides the farm. 

LOLLEDON. 

The said Edmund likewise held in his demesne, as of fee on the 
day that he died, a certain tenement in Lolledon of . . . 
one pair of gilt spurs, price bd. There is there a certain curtilage 
without a messuage, which is worth per annum . . . ; also 
one dovecote, and it is worth per annum y. There are there in 
the demesne 60 acres of arable land . . . and of meadow 
that can be mown 12 acres, and each acre is worth i%d. There is 
there a certain pasture, which is worth . . . 

Peter de la Hoes holds one messuage and one virgate of land, for 
the which he pays per annum lo^., to be taken at the . . . terms 
. . . at the feasts of the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 
and St. Michael. 

The same Peter holds 1 3^ acres of the same lord, and pays per 
annum lod. at the said terms by equal portions. 

Richard Bealgrave holds one messuage and 10 acres of land, and 
pays per annum zs. at the 3 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions ... In Seldon. 

William R'det, John Walkelyn, Thomas Bonag, Edith Badelyng\ 
Adam Why t hind are . . . Sum, jis. lo^d. 

Edmund, son of the said Edmund Gascelyn, is his next heir, and 
is aged 26 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 1 Edward II, No. 49. 



350 Wiltshire 



TT • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn taken at Chylton before the King's escheator, 
A 27th November, i Edward II [1307], of the lands and 
tenements which Henry Thyeys held of the King in chief on the 
day that he died, and how much of others, etc., by the oath of 
Roger de Ardene, William Buxman, Eustace de Gra/ton, John Chanyn, 
Geoffrey Savage, Roger de Cornhulle, William atte More, Adam de 
Brimesdon, Elias Byde, Richard Coterel, Robert Hoppegras, and 
Thomas Dygon, who say that 

Sevenhampton. 

The said Henry held in his demesne as of fee on the day that he 
died, within the manor of Sevenhamton, looj. rent in Ferlslesdon 
of the Lady Margaret, Queen of England, by the service of one 
pair of gilt spurs, price 6d., to be paid in the feast of Easter, and 
doing suit at the court of the said manor from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. 
The said manor of Sevenhamton is in the hand of the said Lady 
the Queen by the demise of the King, father of the now King, for 
the term of her life, but that manor is of the honor of Albemarle, 
which said manor came to the hands of the said Queen by the 
(oT^eiture of Adam de Stratton. Sum, iooj. 

Chylton. 

The said Henry held in his demesne as of fee on the day that he 
died the manor of Chylton of the Earl of Cornwall, as of the honor 
of Walyngford, by the service of one knight's fee. There is there 
one court with a curtilage and a dovecote, and it is worth per 
annum zs. There are there in the demesne of arable land 130 
acres, which are worth per annum 32^. bd., price of the acre 3</. ; 
also of meadow that can be mown 20 acres, and they are worth 
per annum 20J., price of the acre izd. There is there of rent of 
freemen and customars per annum £,(i %s. lod., to be paid at the 
4 principal terms by equal portions. The said customars do not 
owe suit by the year, but they do suit at court. There is there 
one wood, and it contains 8 acres, and the profit is worth per 
annum zs. There is there one water-mill, and it is worth per 
annum ioj. ; also one fulling-mill, and it is worth per annum 
6s. Sd. The pleas and profits of the court are worth per annum zs. 
Sum, ;^io 4J. 



I 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 351 

Lydyherd. 

The said Henry held in his demesne as of fee certain tenements 
in Lydyherd of William de Grandesone and Sibilla his wife, as of 
the pourparty of the inheritance of the said Sibilla, by the service 
of the fourth part of one knight's fee. There is there one messuage 
with a curtilage, and it is worth per annum ^d. There are there 
in the demesne 40 acres of arable land, and they are worth per 
annum bs. Sd., price of the acre 2d. ; also 5 acres of meadow that 
can be mown, and they are worth per annum 5^., price of the acre 
lid. There is there of rent of freemen by the year js. ^d., to be 
paid at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions. There 
are there 7 customars, who pay per annum i^s. 6d. at the said 
terms. They ought to work from the feast of the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael every other day 
in the week except feast days and Sundays, and the day's work of 
one customar is worth id. There are there 9 cottars, each of whom 
pays by the year izd. a.t the said terms by equal portions. Also 
2 cottars, each of whom pays per annum 3J. at the said terms. The 
pleas and perquisites of the court are worth nothing per annum. 
Sum, 66s. 6d. 

Dreykote Folyoht. 

The said Henry held in his demesne as of fee on the day that he 
died the manor of Dreykot Folyoht of Richard Crok, by the service 
of I lb. of pepper, price izd., to be paid in the feast of Easter. 
There Is there one messuage with a curtilage, and it is worth per 
annum %d. There are there in the demesne 100 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum 335-. ^d., price of the acre ^d. ; 
also 6 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 6s., price of 
the acre i id. There are there 8 customars, each of whom pays 
per annum los. at the 4 terms aforesaid ; also 4 cottars, each of 
whom pays per annum 3^'. at the said terms. Sum, £6 izs. 

Henry, son of the said Henry Tyheys [_Thyeys'\, is his next heir, 
and is aged 22 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 1 Edward II, No. 61. 



3!o]^n De foristebur^. 

InCJUlSltlOn taken at Kerewardeston before the King's 
escheator, 21st March, 2 Edward II [1309], by the oath of 
William Waryn, Richard Geruays, John Kepenhull, Thomas Bone- 
clyve, John HomU , Geoffrey Hoppegras, John Grigg, John Chanyn, 
Geoffrey Savage, Stephen de Perham, Walter Giffard, and Walter Dun, 
who say that 



352 Wiltshire 

John de Forstehury held of the King in chief on the day that he 
died one messuage and 4 virgates of land in Westgraftone by the 
service of ioj., to be paid yearly at the castle of Marlborough, viz. 
at the feasts of Pentecost and St. Michael, by equal portions, and 
keeping a certain grove of the lord the King, which is called 
Suthgrove, in the forest of Savernake, and the said messuage and 
land are worth per annum, clear, 23^. \d., and are in the King's 
hand by reason of the minority of Peter, son of the said John de 
Forstehury, and for no other cause. 

The said Peter is the next heir of the said John de Forstehury, and 
on the feast of St. Kalixtus last past was aged 22 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward II, No, 44. 



giol^n De ifot0tebut^» 

PrOOt of age of Peter, son and heir of John de Forstehury, 
deceased, who held of the lord King Edward, father of the 
now King, in chief, taken at Forstehury before the King's escheator, 
22nd December, 2 Edward II [1308], by the oaths underwritten. 

William de Lyllebon, knight, aged 50 years, being sworn and 
diligently examined as to the age of the said Peter, says that he 
was aged 22 years in the feast of St. Laurence the Martyr last 
past, and he knows that he was born at Forstehury in the said 
feast in the 14th year of the reign of the lord King E., 
father of the now King, and was baptized in the church of 
St. Michael at Schaldeborne on the morrow of the said feast, 
and this he knows because in the said feast the said John de 
Forstehury came to Middeltone to the house of the said William, 
and asked him to be godfather to the said Peter, and this he did 
not agree to because of the solemnization of the nuptials to be 
celebrated on the morrow of the said feast between the- mother of 
the said William and Stephen de Britmerestone at Middeltone ; and 
the said John de Forstehury asked him to bear witness of the day 
and year of the birth of the said heir, and the said William im- 
mediately caused to be written on the wall of his hall the day and 
year of the birth of the said heir, and by this he knows that such 
time has elapsed. 

John le Dun, knight, aged 57 years, Nicholas de la Mare, aged 
60 years, William le Chamherleyn, aged 46, Adam de Remmeshury, 
aged 60 years, John Homedieu, aged 67, William Waryn, aged 40, 
Peter Olyver, aged 50, William Bacon^ aged 48, John Frankelayn, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 353 

aged 60, Stephen de Perham, aged 46, and John Grygge, aged 60, 
say that the said heir was aged 22 years on the feast of St. Laurence 
the Martyr last past, and was born at Forstebury in the said feast, 
14 Edward I [1286], and baptized at Shaldeborne on the morrow 
of the said feast ; and this they know because the said John de 
Forstebury after the month of the said feast held a certain feast 
\convivium\ at Westforstebury for the purification of the mother of 
the said heir, on which' day the said John, Nicholas, and others 
were present, together with other neighbours, and were asked to 
bear witness to the day and year of the birth of the said heir when 
he should come to his full age. 

And it was made known by Ptter Olyver and John Kerenhulle at 
Burstach cum Bedewynde to Joan, who was the wife of Robert 
Homedi'eu, Nicholas de Caperygg, Stephen de Waleran, and John 
Homedieu, executors of the will of Robert Homedieu, that they should 
be present at this proof of age to show if they had heard or had 
anything to say why the lands and tenements which were of his 
inheritance should not be given to the said heir, which %di\A Joan, 
Nicholas de Caperygg, and Stephen de Waleran came, but the said 
John Homedieu was not at the said proof, but said that he knew 
nothing .... against the said heir, why the lands and tene- 
ments which were of his inheritance should not be given to him. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., z Edivard II, No. 44. 



Eobert De la ittare. 

InCjUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Robert de la Mare made before the King's escheator at 
Stiipellavyngton, 6th November, 2 Edward II [1308], by the 
oath of Geoffrey Clericus, John le Frend, John Hervy, Robert Gilbert, 
Richard le Eyr, Ralph de la Berfie, Geoffrey Moriz, William Clerk, 
John de Berham, John de Littelton, Richard Simok, and William 
Carpenter, who say that 

Robert de la Mare on the day that he died held in his demesne 
as of fee the manor of Stupellavynton of the King in chief by the 
service of half a knight's fee and being in the fortification of the 
castle of Devizes for 40 days at his own costs in the time of war : 
which said service at the casile is arrented at los. yearly, to be 
paid at the said castle. There is there one messuage with 
a curtilage, and they are worth per annum 4.5'. ; also one garden 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. 11. . 2 3 

2 k 



354 Wiltshire 

which contains \\ acres of land, and is worth per annum, with the 
herbage and fruit, 3^. There are there 200 acres of arable 
land, whereof 60 acres are worth per annum 20^'., price of the 
acre \d., and 140 acres are worth per annum, with the pasture 
of the sheep, 35^., price of tKe acre id. There are there 5 acres 
of meadow which are .worth per annum \zs. 6d., price of the acre 
2j. dd. There is here a certain pasture in common for 12 oxen, 
and it is worth per annum is. ; also a wood in severalty containing 
4 acres, and the pasture of that wood is worth per annum, with 
pannage, 2S. Sum, 78^. bd. 

There are there 8 free tenants who pay per annum 29J. lod. at 
the 4 principal terms by equal portions, 2 of whom pay further at 
the feast of the Nativity of the Lord 2 lbs. of pepper, price zs. ; 
also 2 tenants who pay per annum at the term of Easter, 18^. ; 
also 5 virgators, natives, each of whom holds 22 acres, and pays 
per annum in services and customs 8j. at the said terms ; also 7 
half-virgators, each of whom holds 1 1 acres, and pays per annum 
4J. at the said terms. There is there one native who holds one 
cottage and one mill and pays per annum i is. at the said terms. 
There are there 10 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage with 
a curtilage at the will of the lord, and pays per annum 18a'. at the 
said terms ; also 8 natives, each of whom pays at the Nativity of 
the Lord \d. Sum jQb 1 \s. with the pepper. 

Sum-total, £io qs. 6d., subtracting therefrom the reprise of 
zos., to be paid at the said castle in the feast of St. Michael, and 
so the value is clear £g gs. bd. 

Pder de la Mare, son of the said Robtrl, is his next heir, and was 
aged 14 years at the feast of the Purification of the Blessed Mary 
last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward II, No. 68. 



iSoliert tie la ^Tare. 

InCIUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Robert de la Mare made before the King's escheator at 
Cnabwell, 7th November, 2 Edward II [1308], by the oath of 
John Huberd, John de Cerne, John le JMaresdil, Richard de Slerkele, 
Henry Vygger, William de Wjke, John Ace, William de Stokes, 
William le Here, Walter Bennyleyn, John Luddok, and John le 
Hammyschf who say that 



Inqiiisitiones Post Mortem. 355 

Robert de la Mare on the day that he died held certain tenements 
in Ciiabwell of the Earl q[ Lincoln by the service of half a knight's 
fee, doing for the same common suit at the court of the said Earl 
in the manor of Troubrig. There is there a certain messuage 
with a curtilage, and one croft containing half an acre of land, 
which are worth per annum \s. There are there 48 acres of arable 
land which are worth per annum \is., price of the acre id. There 
is there i acre of meadow lying in common, and it is worth per 
annum zs. ; also the pasture in common for 4 oxen, which is worth 
per annum 2^-. There are there 4 free tenants who pay per annum 
'^hd. at the feast of St. Augustine. Sum, los. <^\d. 

The said Robert also held in the said manor 12 acres of arable 
land oi John de Segre by the service of iid. of yearly rent, to be 
paid at the 4 terms of the year by equal portions : the said 12 acres 
are worth per annum 3.y., price of the acre ^d. Sum, y. 

Sum-total of the value of the manor 23X. ^\d., out of which in 
repayment to John Segre i zd. of yearly rent aforesaid : and so 
there remains clear iis. ^^d. 

Peter de la Jl/are, son of the said Robert, is his next heir, and was 
aged 14 years and more at the feast of the Purification of the 
Blessed Mary last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward II, No. 68. 



g!oI)it COalraunn. 

Inquisition taken before John George, the King's sub- 
eschealor in co. Wilts according to the tenor and form of the 
King's Mandate directed to Sir Walter de Glocester, escheator on 
this side the Trent, of the lands and tenements formerly oi John 
iValraund, 27th August, 3 Edward II [1309], by the oaths o[ Thomas 
Aucher, Robert Wy champ tone, Philip Goion, Nicholas de Wyly, 
Thomas IVelound, Richard Welonnd, Henry Templecombe, Richard 
Codeford, William Beschyne, Hugh Cyreman, William de Sheljhurst^ 
and Ralph de Aula, who say that 

Yatteskury. 

John Walraund ^'\e.d. seised in his demesne as of fee of the manor 
of Yattesbury which he held of the King in chief for half a knight's 
fee. There is there a capital messuage with a garden and curtilage 
which are worth per annum io.r. There are there 217 acres of 



356 Wilis hire 

arable land, and they are worth per annum $\s. 3^., price of the 
acre 30'.; also 9^ acres of meadow, and they are worth 19^. 
There are there feedings and pastures, which are worth per annum 
i-]S. 4</. The office of common herdsman of the oxen pays per 
annum 2s. There is there one windmill, and it is worth per 
annum ibs. Sd. There is there of rent of freemen 21^. 2d. ; also 
of rent of customars per annum 415'. 2d. The chersete of the same 
is worth per annum :\.od. Their works are worth per annum 
4J. S^d. Sum, £g igs. yid. 

Salterton. 

The said /okn Walraund held the manor of Saltertone of the 
Earl of Gloucester for half a knight's fee. There is there a capital 
messuage with a garden and a curtilage, and it is worth per 
annum 6^. %d. ; also a dovecote, and it is worth per annum 4,s. 
There are there iqo acres of arable land, and they are worth 
per annum 20s. lod. price of the acre *i\d.', also 200 acres 
of arable land, and they are worth per annum 33^. 4^., price 
of the acre 2d.; also 16 acres of meadow, and they are worth 
per annum 32J. The feedings and pastures there are worth per 
annum 15J. gd. There is there a certain fishery which is worth 
per annum ds. There is there of rent of assize of free tenants 
by the year ioj. ; also of the rent of villeins per annum 52^. i^^d. 
The works of the said villeins are worth per annum 34^. \old. 
He also held in Nectone and Derneford of the Earl of Lincoln 
for the fourth part of one fee and by the service of 6^. per annum. 
There is there of rent of assize of free tenants bs. ; also of rent of 
villeins by the year 71J. gd., and the works of the said villeins are 
worth 2 35. gd. Sum, £1^ i']s. ^d. 

Wynterborne Assertone. 

The said John de Walraund held the manor of Wynterborne 
Assertone of the Earl of Lincoln for half a knight's fee. There is 
there a capital messuage with a garden and a curtilage, and it is 
worth per annum 4J. ; also a dovecote, and it is worth per annum 
5^. There are there 351 acres of arable land, and they are worth 
per annum 58J. td., price of the acre 2d. ; also 9 J acres of 
meadow which are worth per annum 23^. bd., price of the acre 
2J. bd. The feedings and pastures there are worth per annum 
15J. id. There is there one water-mill, and it is worth per 
annum 20s. Also of rent of assize of free tenants per annum 
one pair of gloves and 2 lbs. of pepper, which are worth 2s. id. 
There is there of rent of customars per annum 52^. td. ; also of 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 357 

chersete at the feast of St. Martin, which fs worth per annum y. id. 
The works of the said villeins are worth there per annum 48^. iid. 
The pannage of the said customars is worth per annum at the feast 
of St. Martin 3^. ; the tallage of the same is worth at the feast of 
St. Michael 10s. The ploughings of custom of the said customars 
is worth per annum i6c/. The perquisites of court are worth per 
annum 3J. Sum, ^12 -js. 8d. 

* Joan, wife of Alexander de Frevill, daughter and heir o{ Mazere, 
daughter and one of the heirs of Joan Marmyont aunt of the said 
John Walraund and Ralph de Buieler, son and heir of Matilda, 
another daughter and heir of the said Joan Marmyon, sister of 
Isabella, mother of the said John Walraund, are the next heirs of 
the said John : the said Joan Frevill is aged 40 years, and the said 
Ralph 60 years. 

Fyfhyde Verdon. 

The said John Walraund held 2 carucates of land in Fyfhyde 
Verdon next Lavyntone of the Earl of Arundel, and the manor is 
worth per annum, clear, ;^i5 6j. \o\d. 

He also held 20^. -jd. of yearly rent in Fyshertone oi Aucher son 
of Hejiry, and the said Aucher of the Earl of Lincoln in chief, by 
what services the jurors know not : of the which tenements and 
rents Alice de Everyugham, one of the daughters of Cecilia, one of 
the aunts of the said John ; Bogo de Cnovill, son o{ Joan de Cnovill, 
another of the daughters of the said Cecilia ; Matilda, who was the 
wife of Richard le Bret, and Joan de Helyon, daughters of Cecilia, 
third daughter of the said Cecilia, are the kinsfolk and next heirs 
of the said John Walraund of the said inheritance happening to 
him on behalf of William Walraund, father of the said John : the 
said Alice is aged 40 years, the said Bogo de Cnovill 30 years, the 
said Matilda 35 years, and the said>a« de Helyon 36 years. 

Sum of the extent of the manor of Fyfhyde, ;^i5 6s. lohd. 

Sum of the extent of Fischerton, 20^-. -jd. 

Chan. Liq. p.m., 2 Edward II, A^. 80. 



31oftrt malraunn. 

Inquisition of the lands which were o( John Walraund. 
made before the King's escheator at New Sarum, 3rd April, 
2 Edward II [1309], by the oath of Robert Gileberd, Philip Gogoun, 
Thomas Aucher, Gilbert de Berewyk, William de Wyli, Hugh 
Schirman, John Kytavyne, Thomas Weylond, Walter le Chamberlayn, 
John de Lucy, Robert Aluerich, and John de Bacham, who say that 



2 4 • 



358 Wiltshire 

There are in the King's hand of the inheritance of John 
Walraund, lately deceased, tenements in Fyfhyde Verdoyn next 
Stipellavyntone of the which Robert Walraund, uncle of the said 
John, was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died : 
the said tenements are held of the Earl of Arundel by the service 
of half a knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a curtilage which are 
worth per annum 5^. ; also a dovecote, and it is worth per annum 
5J : sum, \os. There are there of arable land in the field which is 
called Westfelde, by the perch of 16J feet, 148 acres, and in 
Estfelde 128J acres; also in a certain croft which is called 
Nyweme 9 acres, and each acre is worth per annum 4^: surn, 
£\ \y. 6d. Also of meadow that can be mown g acres, and there 
is common pasture thereof after the hay is carried until the Puri- 
fication of the Blessed Mary, and each acre is worth by the year 
1 2d. : sum, gj. There is there of pasture in the moor half an acre, and 
it is several and is worth per annum 6d. There is there a pasture 
which is called Fermbrech, in the which William de Peram shall have 
5 oxen and one plough-horse, William de Stoke 6 oxen and one 
plough-horse, Reginald atte Putte 4 oxen and one plough-horse, and 
Thomas Albred one cow in the pasture with the lord's oxen. There 
is there a pasture which is called Smalemerh Thornes and on 
Rouchedon, in the which the said W. de Perham, William de Stoke, 
Reginald Aite putte, and Thomas Albred shall have their said beasts 
with the lord's oxen between Hockday until they are put into the 
stables, and they may maintain in the said pasture 16 of the 
lord's oxen, and the pasture of each is worth 5</., and besides the 
sustentation of the said beasts that pasture is worth per annum \os. 
The said William de Peram shall have in the said pastures 62 sheep, 
William de Stoke 62 sheep, Roger atte Putte 31 sheep, and Thomas 
Albred 7 sheep. 

All the customars of the manor shall have in the said pastures 
all the sheep which and when they shall be in the lord's fold, and 
they shall give the loth sheep which they shall have in the lord's 
fold, and if they cannot fill the lord's fold with their own sheep 
the bailiff or reeve shall search for foreign ones, and then he shall 
take for each sheep at Hokeday \d. And there were this year of 
sheep forthcoming of the tithe of the customars 27 at Hokeday, 
price of each \id. There is there a certain pasture which is called 
La Heye which is arented to the customars of the vill for is. per 
annum in the feast of St. Michael. There may be maintained in 
the said pastures to fill the lord's fold 300 sheep. Sum of the said 
pastures and sheep, 46J. id. The manure of the beasts pastujing 



Inquisitiones Post Morte^n. 359 

upon Rouchedon is worth one year with another ^^d. The bracken 
\_fugera\ in the pastures in divers places is worth per annum zs. 
There is there one wood containing almost one acre, in the which 
there is no herbage, the profit whereof is worth per annum bd. Sum, 
3^. bd. There is there of rent of assize of free tenants i lb. of wax 
at the feast of Easter and 3 lbs of wax at the feast of Pentecost, 
price of the pound bd. ; also 14^. of rent of assize to be paid at the 
Nativity of the Lord, the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and the feast of St. Michael by 
equal portions. 

There are there 17 customars each of whom holds 10 acres of 
land and pays per annum is. at 4 terms of the year, viz., at 
Christmas 12^., at Easter i2</., at Midsummer i2</., and at 
Michaelmas is. ; also 5 lesser \minores^ customars and cottars who 
pay per annum i \s. at the said terms. Sum-total of the rents, 
WIS. Each of the said customars shall give at the feast of 
St. Martin 3 hens and one cock, price of each i</., sum ^s. Sd., 
and shall do each week between the feast of St. Michael and the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist, if the lord shall wish, 6 works, 
except festival days on wfiich they ought not to work, and they 
ought to do by the day one work or to thresh one bz. of wheat, or rye, 
or barley, or beans, or peas, or 2 bz. of oats of measure heaped up 
for one work, and for every 6 works which he shall do in the time 
aforesaid there ought to be allowed him id. of his rent. And if 
they shall not do the works, then he shall give nothing except only 
his rent, and so those works are not extended. Also each of them 
shall do each week between the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 
and the feast of St. Michael, if the lord will, 6 works. He shall 
mow 2 " swathz " in the meadow, which is called Suthemerh, for 
one work until all the meadow shall be mown; and he shall reap 
for 2 days in Radgaresmede for 2 works ; and he ought to mow for 
one day in the meadow called Bischcppesdich for one work allowed 
to him. And be it known that on the said 3 days they shall only 
mow from the rising of the sun until the third hour. And they 
ought to carry the hay for the works allowed them ; and on the 
day that he shall carry he shall have of the lord his breakfast, viz. 
bread and ale, and at the ninth hour he shall have his food, so that 
he may have bread, and he with his fellows shall have one dish of 
meat or peas and half a gallon of ale ; and when the meadow shall 
be mown he and his fellows shall have of the lord one sheep or 
lid. and 2 bz. of wheat. And he shall lift, bind, and help over 
half an acre of whatsoever kind of grain it may be for one work, 
and for each half-acre which he shall lift he shall have the 20th 



360 Wiltshire 

sheaf. And after the Autumn is finished he shall do what he shall be 
commanded for one work for half a day, and for carrying the corn 
until it shall all be carried, and in the Autumn in taking of food as 
above, and each day that he shall carry he shall have of the lord 
instead of his supper one sheaf of corn which he shall have carried, 
and for every 6 works which he shall do there shall be allowed him 
id. of his rent ; and if he shall not do those works, he shall give 
nothing for the same, therefore they are not extended. Each of 
the said 17 customars ought to wash the sheep for one day, price 
of the work ^</., and to shear the sheep for one day, and that 
work is worth J^., and he ought to carry z hurdles of the lord's fold 
frohi one field to another whenever it shall be necessary, and that 
custom is worth of each customar per annum \d. 

There are there 2 cottars, one of whom ought to scatter the 
grass of the whole meadow of the manor with the help of the 
servants of the court, and it is estimated that that custom can be 
made every year within 8 days, and he shall have his food once 
each day, and the work is worth by the day \d. ; and the other 
cottar ought to put the hay into cocks in the barton for one day, 
price of the work ^d. : sum, 35-. 2\d. Each of the said 17 
customars shall be reeve or farm bailiff if the lord will, and then he 
shall be quit of his rent and all customs, or shepherd, and then he 
shall be quit of his rent and customs, and shall have of the lord in 
the feast of St. Martin one ewe or tid. ; and if the lord shall have 
his own sheep, then he shall have one fleece of wool and one lamb 
going to the lord's fold upon his land for 15 days about the feast 
of St. Martin, and shall have one acre of the lord's land which is 
called Wexkyngakur and a certain piece of land which is called 
Hundhalve and 3 " lynches," and the said acre of land ought to be 
ploughed twice in the year with the lord's plough to be held or driven, 
and then he shall be quit of his rent and all his customs. And he 
ought to have the ploughing of 5 acres of the lord's land in the 
time of Winter and Lent, and 5 acres in the Summer lying fallow. 
And after his death the lord shall have the best beast that he shall 
have for a heriot ; and he shall not marry his son or daughter out 
of the manor without license, neither shall he sell his horse or his 
ox without license. Each of the said 7 customars and cottars shall 
give of custom to the lord's larder at the feast of St. Martin loj. : 
sum, los. And each of them shall give for each pig over one year 
which he shall have id., and for each pig of half a year ^d., and 
the pannage was worth this year 4</. The pleas and perquisites of 
the court with fines for lands, reliefs, and heriots per annum, half 
a mark. Also of capitage of 14 boys 6^ lbs. of wax, price of the 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 361 

pound bd. Also of capitage of 5 boys, 5 iron feet, price of each 
z\d. Sum, loj. io\d. Sum-total, ;^i5 45'. 4J. 

The said Robert held on the day that he died in his demesne as 
of fee zos. 4^. yearly rent in Fysschertone next New Sarum of the 
tenements which Robert le Poleter held of him, but of whom that 
rent is held the jurors know not. Sum, zos. \d. 

John de Eddesworth, son oi Ales', one of the aunts of the said John 
Walrautid, Bogo de Knovill, son of Joan de Knovill, one of the 
daughters of Cecilia, another of the aunts of the said John, Alice de 
Everingham, another of the daughters of the said Cecilia, and 
Matilda, who was the wife of Richard le Bryt and Cecilia de Helion 
whom Peter de Helion married, daughters of Cecilia, third daughter 
of the said Cecilia, are the kinsfolk and next heirs of the said John 
Walraund: the said John de Eddenvorth is aged 40 years, Bogo de 
Knovill 25 years, Alice de Everyngham 40 years, Matilda, wife of 
Richard le Bryt, 26 years, and Cecilia de Helion 25 years. 

Robert Walraund, uncle of the said John IValraund, had a third 
sister, Alice, named Plugenet, of whose issue the jurors do not know, 
because she did not dwell in the parts of Wiltshire. 

Chan. Iriq. p.m., 2 Edivard II, No. 68. 



InOUlSltlOn taken at Devizes on Monday next before the 
feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 2 Edward II [1309], before 
the escheator in co. Wilts, by Robert de Wichamplon, Richard de 
Ringesborne, John de Porham, John As, John de Saundotie, I'homas de 
Hortone, Richard Weylond, Robert Barvile, Michael le Espervir, Ralph 
de Aula, William Brichameburi, and William de Wyli, who say that 

Fifide next Lavintone, Yatesbury, Asscerton in Winterborne 
Saltertone, and the rent of 5 marks in Fiserton next Sarum are of 
the inheritance of John Walronde, and he was thereof seised in his 
demesne as of fee on the day that he died. Robert Walrond, his 
uncle, died seised in his demesne of Fifide next Lavinton, and of 
a certain rent in Fiserton ; he was also seised of Yatesbury 
Asserton in Winterborne on the day that he died, but of the fee 
they know nothing. 

In Fifide there are 293 acres of arable land, and each acre is 
worth by itself ^d. ; also 9 acres, and each acre is worth 1 zd. There 
is there pasture for 24 oxen, and the pasture of an ox is worth 5^/. ; 
also pasture for 300 sheep, and the pasture of a sheep is worth ^d. 



362 Wiltshire 

There is there of rent of assize per annum 103^., 4 Ihs. of wax, and 
56 hens, and the hen is worth \d. The extent of the court and 
garden is bs. id. ; it is held of the Church of Sarum by the service 
of one wax candle. 

Sum-total £\2 14J. ^d., and of wax zod. 

At Yalesbury there is a capital messuage, and it is worth per 
annum 5^. There are there 217 acres of arable land worth 54^.30?., 
and 9^ acres of meadow worth \(^s. There is there pasture in la 
Northfelde and on Coulesho, and it is worth per annum 4^. Also 
of rent of assize, per annum, 6\s. id. ; and of rent to the 
" succentor" of Sarum to have pasture on Northlese 3^., of rent of 
Robert Barvile one pair of spurs, price 6</ , of Hugh Carswell (ox 
a certain ditch 4 hens, price id., and of chersete 10 cocks and 
30 hens, price ^s. ^d. There are there 8 ciistomars and 9 cottars 
who do 10 works at mowing the hay, and they are worth beyond 
reprises 10^., price of the work \d.; and 47 works at raising the 
hay, and they are worth i\d., and scattering the hay, and they are 
worth ^Id. ; and 14 works at putting the hay into cocks, and they 
are worth id., and carrying 27 hurdles, and the work is worth -^^d. ; 
and 27 weedings of the corn, and they are worth b\d. And it is 
held of the King by the service of half a knight's fee. 

Sum-total, £i 45-. -jld. 

Asscerton in Wynterborne is held of the Earl of Lincoln for half 
a knight's fee, and there is there a capital messuage which is worth 
per annum 4^'., 2 gardens worth per annum 4^., one dovecote, price 
5J., 351 acres of land, worth 59J. <^d. ; 9J acres of meadow worth 
23J. 9</., price of the acre zs. 6d. ; of rent of Hugh Dauheneye for 
keeping the said meadow, one pair of gloves, price \d.\ of 3 acres 
of pasture at Neumede, is. ; 3 acres of pasture at Hopemerehs, y. ; 
common of pasture on the hill for 250 sheep, \os. <^d. ; one water- 
mill, iQS. ; of rent of assize of freemen 2 lbs. of pepper, is., and of 
customars z^is. 6d., at the feasts of St. Thomas the Apostle, Palm 
Sunday, and St. Giles equally, 28 hens and 10 cocks at the feast of 
St. Martin, 35'. id. There are there 7 customars, each of whom 
shall do per annum divers works as in carrying dunghills, harrowing 
land, ploughing the lord's corn, washing and shearing the lord's 
sheep; and shall do 5 works from the feast of the Nativity of 
St. John up to the feast of St. Michael in each week ; and shall 
mow and scatter and raise the lord's hay; and each of them shall 
do one day's work in the Autumn. There is there one customar 
who shall carry dunghills for one day, harrow for one day, carry 
for one day to sell the corn, and shall wash and shear the lord's 
sheep. There are there 3 customars, each of whom shall do 



Inquisit tones Post Mo7'tem. 363 

2^ works of the said 14 weeks, and one day's work in Autumn. 
Also 5 cottars, each of whom shall raise the hay and put it into 
cocks for one day, and shall do one bedripe in Autumn. All the 
customars and cottars give pannage of their pigs at the feast of 
St. Martin, and they are taxed at the feast of St. Martin, and it is 
worth loj. Each of the 10 customars aforesaid, for each ox or cow 
having 2 teeth which they shall have, shall plough one acre at the 
winter sowing and one acre to be fallow, and it is worth per annum 
i6(/. The perquisites of the court are worth per annum 3^. \d. 

Sum-total, £\z x^s. \\d. 

Isabella Walrond died seised of the manor of Saltertone, and it is 
of the inheritance o^ John Walrond, and he died thereof seised in 
his demesne as of fee. The jurors do not know who are his next 
heirs, but they say that John de Edesivorth, Bogo de Knovill, Alice de 
Everingham, Matilda Brei't, and Cecilia El ion wife oi Peter Elion are 
the next heirs of the said yc^/^/z Walrond ^.■^ to the other tenements 
in CO. Wilts. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edrvard II. A'o. 80. 



3ol)n malrauitD. 

Inquisition taken at New Sarum before the King's 
escheator, lolh September, 3 Edward II [1309], by the oath 
of Robert Gerberd, Walter de Comptone, Gilbert de Beravyke, Peter 
Whippe, Thomas de Welounde, Robert de Wichamptone, John de Lucy, 
John de KyngesmiiU, John de Harnham, William le Duyn, John 
Martyn, Thomas le Hun/e, and Waller Warde, who say that 

John Walratin i \\%\6. 2 carucates of land in Fyfhyde Verdon next 
Lavyntone of the Earl of Arundel, and the manor is worth per 
annum, clear, ^15 los. lohd. 

He also held 20^^. 4^. of yearly rent in Fyschertone of Aucher 
son of Henry, by what services the jurors do not know. 

Alan de Plugenet, son and heir o{ Alaji de Plugcnct, son and heir 
of Alice, sister of William Walraund, father of the said John, of the 
whole blood, and aunt of the %-o\A. John, is the nest heir of the said 
John Walraund : the said Alan is aged 28 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., z Edivard II, A^o. 80. 



364 Wiltshire 



9l0abella malrautiD. 

IriQUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Isabella Walraund, mother of John Walraund, taken at New 
Sarum before the King's escheator, 4th April, 2 Edward II [1309], 
by the oath o{ Robert Gilebcrd, John de Bacham, Robert Al/rych, John 
de Lucy, Thomas Weylond, Walter le Chamberlayti, John de Kytewyne, 
William de Wyly, Gilbert de Berewyke, Thotfias Aucher, Philip Goioun, 
and Hugh Schirman, who say that 

Isabella Walraund on the day that she died held in her demesne 
as of fee the manor of Salterton of the Earl of Gloucester by the 
service of half a knight's fee. There is there one messuage with 
a curtilage and garden, and thiey are worth per annum 6^. %d. ; 
also one dovecote, and it is worth per annum \s. There are there 
300 acres of arable land, 100 acres whereof are worth per annum 
32^., price of the acre is. There is there a certain pasture for 200 
sheep and a half on the hill, and it is worth per annum \os. sd., 
price per head ^d. ; also a certain pasture for 16 oxen, and it is 
worth per annum 5J. ^d., price per head ^d. ; also a certain fishery 
which is worth per annum 6^-., sum 6i'. 

Free Tenants. 

There are there the free tenants underwritten, viz., Clarice aite 
Nywetoutie, who holds by succession of inheritance one messuage 
and 2 virgates of land in the said vill by the service of los. per 
annum, to be paid at the feasts of St. Michael, the Purification, and 
Pentecost, by equal portions. 

Henry Sewy holds one messuage and one virgate of land in 
bondage by the service of 5^. qd. at the said terms, and shall do 
32 works between the feast of the gule of August and the feast of 
St. Michael, or shall pay 4^^. at the feast of the Nativity of the 
Blessed Mary. 

Henry alte Nywetoune holds in the same way one rftessuage and 
one virgate of land by the service of 5J. to be paid yearly at the 
said terms, and he shall work like the said Henry Sewy or pay 4^. 
at the said feast. 

John atte Nywetoune holds in the same way as the said Henry 
Sewy and pays per annum at the said terms $s. 6d., and shall work 
or pay like the said Henry. 

Williarn Dun holds in the same way as much as the said Henry 
and pays at the said terms -[s., and shall work or pay as above. 

Henry Reynald and Henry atte Nywetoune each holds in the same 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 365 

way and as much as the said Henry Sewy, and they pay per annum 
at the said terms 5^., and shall do or pay for their works as above. 

William Upehtill holds in the same way and as much as the said 
Henry, and pays per annum is. 9^. at the said terms and shall work 
like the said Henry. 

Henry Rok" holds in the same way as the said Henry and pays 
per annum 6^. lold. at the said terms, and shall work like the said 
Henry. 

William Nychole holds one cottage and 4 acres of land and pays 
45-. bd. at the said terms, and shall do i8(?) works in the time 
aforesaid or pay is. \\d. 

William atte Grene holds one croftlond and pays per annum at 
the said terms zs., and shall do 4 works as above, and the work is 
worth lid. 

Sum of the particulars aforesaid, £10 i^s. lod. 

CUSTOMARS. 

The said Isabella on the day that she died had the tenants under- 
written in her demesne as of fee and held of the Earl of Lincoln 
by the service of the fourth part of one knight's fee in Necton 
and Durneford Magna, viz., Thomas Vyvyan, who holds in fee of 
inheritance one messuage and one acre of land by the service of 
bs. at the said terms ; John Dun holds in villeinage one messuage 
and one virgate of land containing 20 acres, by the service of ^s., 
to be paid at the said terms, and shall work like the said Henry 
Savy, Thomas de Wyllon holds in the same way and shall do like 
the said/c-^w Dun; Reginald de Necton holds in the same way and 
shall pay and do like the said John Dun ; Robert Savery holds in 
the same way as much and shall pay and do like the said y^/^w 
Dun ; Roger IngolJ holds in the same way and shall do like the 
said John Dun ; Richard IngolJ \\o\ds as much and pays per annum 
55-. 9</. ; John Goldyng holds as much and pays bs. per annum, and 
shall work like the aforesaid [tenants] ; Matilda Waryn in the 
same way holds as much and pays per annum i is. . 

Isabel I la Dun holds one cottage and pays per annum is. at the 
said terms ; Amice Goldyng holds as much and pays per annum 
iid.; John I/tgolJ holds one virgate of land containing 30 acres, 
and pays per annum Ss. at the said terms ; Henry Perys holds like 
the said Johii IngolJ, and pays per annum -js. at the said terms ; 
Walter Pynnok holds one messuage and one virgate of land con- 
taining 20 acres by the service of ^s.: whereof to the Earl of 
Lincoln at the feast of St. Michael yearly 6j. Sum, \o\s. gd., 
whereof the reprises bs. 

Sum-total, clear, ^15 \\s. ']d. 



366 Wiltshire 

Joan, wife of Alexander de Friville, daughter and heir o^ Mazare, 
daughter and one of the heirs o^ Joan Marmyoun, aunt of the said 
John Walraund, and Ralph le Bouliler, son and heir of Matilda, 
another daughter and heir of the said Joan Marmyoun, sister of 
Isabella, mother of the said John Walraund, are the next heirs of 
the saidyt?A« of the lands and tenements aforesaid : the said Joan 
wife of Alexander de Fryville is aged 40 3'ears, and the said Ralph le 
Botelir 36 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edivard II, No. 80. 



glabella raalronti- 

InQUlSltlOn of the lands and tenements which were of 
Isabella, mother of John Walrond, made before the King's 
escheator 3rd April, 2 Edward II [>309], by the oath of Robert 
Gerberd, Philip Goion, Thomas Aucher, John Kulivyne, Thomas 
Weylond, Gilbert de Bervcyk, Walter Chaumbeiiayn, Robert Aljrych, 
William de Wyly, John de Bacham, Hugh Sirman, and John de Lucy, 
who say that 

Isabella Walraund on the day that she died held in her demesne 
as of fee the manor of Yatesbury of the King in chief by the 
service of the moiety of a knight's fee. There is there a messuage 
with a curtilage and the herbage of the garden, and they are worth 
per annum 5J. There are there of arable land in the field which is 
called Estfelde 121 J acres, and in the field of \_sic] Suthfelde 
95^ acres, and they are worth per annum $\s. ^d., price of the acre 
id., also of meadow that can be mown ()\d., and the pasture 
thereof is common after the carrying of the hay until the Sunday 
next after the feast of the Purification of the Blessed jNIary, and 
they are worth per annum iqs., price of the acre 2^'. There is 
there a certain pasture which is called Northfelde, in the which John 
de Taiy, Robert de Barvyle, John de Somerjord, Hugh de Crasioell, 
Robert Aljrych, Richard de Gatesterste, and Joh7i de Colcestre ought to 
have common with all their beasts and to have ingress and egress 
with the beasts of the lord of this manor, and besides the 
maintenance of the said beasts. There may be pastured in the 
same one year with another 32 beasts, and the pasture of each 
beast between Hockday and the feast of St. Martin is worth 5</., 
whereof nevertheless the said John de Tavy and the others above- 
said may take the moiety against the lord of this manor, be it more 



Inqtiisitiones Post Mortem. 367 

or less. They may also maintain in the same pasture 16 of the 
lord's oxen, and the pasture of each is worth ^d. for the said time. 
And between the feast of St. Martin and the Purification of the 
Blessed Mary the said pasture is common for the sheep of the men 
of that manor. Also there is there pasture on Coulesko eruth(.?), 
and it is several throughout the whole year, and it is worth per 
annum \zd. The tenants of the " succentors " of Sarum give of 
ancient custom to have common on Norylose at Hockday 3^. 
Whoever shall be common shepherd of the beasts pasturing on 
Norylose shall give for having his office per annum in the feast of 
St. Michael zs. Sum of the pastures to the use of the lord, clear, 
19J. \d. There is there one windmill, and it is worth per annum 
one mark: sum, 13J. 4^/. There is there of rent of assize of free 
tenants, viz., of John Tavey, per annum 20s. at the terms of the 
Nativity of the Lord, Easter, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 
and St. Michael by equal portions ; also the rent of Robert de 
Barvyle in the feast of St. Michael one pair of gilt spurs, price bd. ; 
also of the rent of Hugh de Garwell for a certain ditch at the 
Nativity of the Lord 4 capons, price 8^, Also of rent of customars 
and cottars per annum 41J. zd. to be paid at the said 4 principal 
terms. Sum, tis. \d. And of the custom of customars in the 
feast of St. Martin of chersete 10 cocks, 30 hens, price per head 
\d. : sum, 3^. ^d. There are there 8 customars, one of whom 
holds 21 acres of land and ought to mow the lord's meadow with 
one man for 3 days at the food of the lord twice in the day, and 
each one of 3 customars holds 10 acres of land, and each one of 4 
customars holds one cottage, one acre of land, and shall mow the 
lord's meadow for one day at the food of the lord twice in the day, 
price of the work i^. The said 8 customars ought to carry all the 
hay with the aid of 4 cottars, so that one of the said 8 customars 
shall find each day 3 men, and each of the 7 customars and 4 
customars shall find one man to carry the hay until all shall be 
carried. And it is estimated that one year with another it may be 
carried in 3 days, price of the work id. Also 3 of the said cottars 
ought to scatter all the grass of 9^ acres so that they may have for 
one day their food twice in the day of the lord, and that custom is 
worth 4J^/. Also one of the said 8 customars ought to put the hay 
into cocks in the barton for one day with 3 men, and each of the 
7 customars shall find one man for one day, and each of the 4 
cottars shall find one man for one day to cock the hay in the 
barton with 2 repasts, price of the work ^d. Also one of the 8 
customars shall carry 6 hurdles of the fold from one field to 
another once in the year, and each of the said 7 customars and 3 



368 Wiltshire 

cottars shall carry 2 hurdles, and one cottar shall carry one hurdle 
from one field to another, and the carrying of two hurdles is worth 
\d. Each of the 9 cottars shall find one man from the ninth hour up 
to vespers each day to weed the lord's corn until all the corn of the 
manor shall be weeded, and it is estimated that it may be weeded 
in 3 half-days, price of the work \d. One of the said 8 customars 
ought to carry goods in a waggon \jiverare\ so that he shall 
seek his victuals from the lord or the steward at 3 markets or more 
with his horse, and for each carrying that he shall do he shall have 
his food and hay for his horse while he shall be at his meal 
\j:ommesium\. Each of the 3 customars ought to carry in the 
same way for the moiety, nevertheless each of them shall carry as 
often as it shall be necessary. Unless the lord shall be there or 
shall come or his steward they shall carry nothing, and none of 
them shall give anything for the same, so the works are not 
extended. Also each of the said 7 cottars ought to carry on foot, 
so that he shall carry the letters where he shall be commanded, so 
that he may return home that day, and if it shall happen to him to 
be benighted (or spend the night there), then he shall have of his 
lord his charges, and he need not do any other carrying, therefore 
it is put at one carrying, price \d. Sum, \s. %\d. 
Sum-total, ^10 \s. i\d. 

[Heirs as in previous Inquisition.] 

Chan. Inq. p.jn,, 2 Edward II, No. 80. 



3]0abeUa De malrontJ* 

InnUlSltlOn of the lands which were of Isabella, mother 
o{ John Walrond, made before the King's escheator 3rd April, 
2 Edward II [1309], by the oath of Robert Girberd, Philip Gorvun, 
Thomas Aucher, John Kyitivyne, Thomas Weylond, Gilbert de Berewjk, 
Walter Chamberleyn, Robert Aljrich, William de Wyly, John de Bacham^ 
Hugh Sirman., and John de Lucy, who say that 

There are in the King's hand of the inheritance of the said 
John Walrond, lately deceased, the tenements underwritten in 
Wynterbourne Assertone of the which the said Isabella, mother 
of the said John, was seised in her demesne as of fee on the day 
that she died. 

There is there a messuage, and it is worth per annum 45'. There 
are there 2 gardens which contain 2^ acres, and the herbage and 
fruit are worth per annum 4^. There is there one dovecote in 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 369 

ruins, and it is worth per annum ^s. Sum, 1 3^. There are there 
of arable land in the field called Surfeld 156 acres, and each acre 
is worth per annum 3^.; also in Nortfelde 165 acres of land, 
whereof each acre of 18 acres is worth per annum \d. ; and each 
acre of 147 acres is worth per annum id. There are there 10 
acres of land in the fields of Surfelde and Nortfelde which some- 
time were of Reginald, rector of the Chapel of Wynterbourne of 
the demise of Matilda Walround, and each acre is worth per annum 
T,d. Sum, 595-. 9^. There are there of meadow that can be 
mown 93 acres at Wychford whereof William son of Waller, 
formerly lord of that manor, granted the custody of the said 
meadow to Hugh Daiiheneye so that he shall have the attachments 
thereof forthcoming, and the damages which shall be found in the 
time of mowing to be taxed by the men of this manor, and he 
shall satisfy the lord and shall have after the hay is carried in the 
said meadow all his beasts with the lord's beasts, and each acre is 
worth per annum is. bd. The said Hugh de Daubeyne shall pay 
per annum in the feast of St. Michael for the custody of the said 
park one pair of gloves price \d. Sum of the meadows, 23^. 9^. 
and one pair of gloves, price \d. There are there in the pasture of 
Nywemede 3 acres and it is several throughout the whole year, and 
is worth per annum is. At Hopmers there are 3 acres of pasture 
and it is several between the feast of the Purification of the 
Blessed IMary and the gule of August, and it is worth per annum 
IS. ; and the said pasture is common between the gule of August 
and the feast of the Purification of the Blessed Mary. There is 
there pasture on the hill in the which the Rector of the Church of 
Berewyk shall have 65 sheep, Edmund Attenehorne 65 sheep, John 
Edmund 65 sheep throughout the whole year. There are there 
7 customars each of whom holds 24 acres of land and shall have in 
the same pasture 65 sheep ; also 3 smaller customars each of 
whom holds half a virgate of land and shall have in the said 
pasture 32 sheep quit, and they may maintain in the said pasture 
by the year besides the maintenance of the said sheep 250 sheep, 
and the pasture of each sheep is worth per annum \d. Sum, 
1 5 J. ^d. There is there a water-mill, and it is worth per annum 
20J. There is there of rent of assize of free tenants 2 lbs. of pepper, 
price IS. ; also of rent of customars by the year 52^. 6(/., to be paid 
at 3 terms of the year, viz., at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle 
17J. bd , on Palm Sunday 17^-. bd., and in the feast of St. Giles 
17J. bd. : sum, 52?. bd. and 2 lbs. of pepper, price 2s. There is 
there of chersete in the feast of St. Martin 28 hens and 10 cocks, 
price of each id.: sum, 3J. 2d. There are there 7 customars each 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. II. 24 

2 5 



370 Wiltshire 

of whom holds 24 acres of land and one customar holds 12 acres 
• of land, each of whom ought to carry the manure of the lord in the 
morrow of St. Michael until all the manure shall be carried, and it 
is estimated that it may be c;arried in 2 days, but one of the said 
customars ought not to carry except every other day, and each of 
them shall come with one horse and his cart and shall have hay of 
the lord while he shall carry for his horse within the court, and 
when they shall have carried all the manure they shall have in 
common of the lord 3 gallons of ale or 3^'., and the work of each 
is worth by the day zd. \ sum, is. bd. The said 7 customars ought 
to harrow all the land to be sown with oats until they shall reach 
the ploughings of the manor, and one customar who holds 
12 acres of land shall do the moiety of the harrowing as one of the 
said 7 customars shall do, and they shall have after that harrowing 
of the lord id., and it is estimated that that custom may be done 
one year with another within 2 days, and the harrowing of each 
one is worth by the day \d.: sum, 15^/. The said 7 customars 
ought with the aid of one smaller customar who shall do the 
moiety of the service which one of them shall do, to carry all the 
corn of the manor when it shall be sold at Sarum, Wilton, and 
Ambresbury, so that each of them shall carry half a quarter of 
whatsoever kind of corn it shall be, and shall have of the lord for 
each carrying \d. And it is estimated that all the corn may be 
sold within 3 days, and the carrying of each is worth by the day 
\d. Sum, i6|(/. The said 7 customars ought to wash and .shear 
the lord's sheep, and they shall have one cheese or \d. There is 
there one customar who shall do the moiety of the service which 
one of them shall do, and that custom is worth "jl^d. Each of the 
said 7 larger customars shall do each week between the feast of 
the Nativity of St. John the Baptist and the feast of St. Michael 
5 works, except 4 weeks in autumn ; so that each one of them 
shall do that which is commanded him for half a day for one work 
or he shall weed half an acre of corn, and the price of the work is 
\d. Also each of them shall do each week for one month in 
autumn 5 works, so that he shall lift, bind, and help over half an 
acre of barley or vetch or beans or peas, or one acre of wheat or 
oats for one work, and he ought to carry with one horse and his 
cart with his fellows, and each day that he shall carry he shall have 
one sheaf of such corn as he shall carry for one work allowed to 
him, price of the work \ld. There are there 3 smaller customars 
each of whom holds 12 acres of land and shall do the moiety of 
the work which one of the said 7 customars shall do. Sum of the 
works beside autumnal 425 works, price of the work \d. : sum, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 371 

11$. Sid. Sum of the autumn works 170 works, price of the work 
\id. : sum, 21s. $d. Each of the said 7 customars ought to mow, 
scatter, and raise all the lord's meadow and to carry the hay 
thereof, and each day that they shall mow each of them shall have 
as much hay as he can lift with his scythe, and there shall be 
allowed to each of them for mowing the said meadow 6 works and 
for carrying 3 works, and they shall have when they shall have 
mowed the meadow and carried the hay thereof iid. of the custom 
which is called " Medram " and one cheese or id., and the custom 
of the carrying of hay of each customar is worth, clear, ^d., sum 
2id. Each man of the customars shall do one day's work in 
autumn with 2 men with one repast, so that the two men shall 
have bread, ale and pottage, and one dish of meat or peas and 
cheese for one work allowed him, and the price of each day's work 
is clear id. There are there 3 smaller customars and 5 cottars 
each of whom shall do one day's work with one repast of the lord, 
as above, and each day's work is worth id. : sum, i^d. Also 
5 cottars each of whom ought to raise the hay in the lord's meadow 
for one day, and to cock the hay in the barton for one day, price 
of the work id. : sum, 10^. All the customars and cottars having 
pigs shall give for each pig over one year id. in the feast of 
St. Martin, and for each pig of half a year Id., and the custom is 
worth this year 3^/. All the customars ought to be taxed, and they 
give of custom in the feast of St. Martin los. The pleas and 
perquisites of the court with fines, heriots, and reliefs are worth 
per annum 3^. ^d. 

To this manor there belongs a certain chapel within the manor, 
and for the maintenance of the rector serving the said chapel he 
shall take all the tithes forthcoming from the demesne lands and 
from 13 acres of land which are in the hand of the tenants of the 
manor, and also all the tithes of the mill, gardens, and dovecote, 
and also all the small tithes of the lord of the manor, and the said 
chapel is worth one year with another 26^. Sd. Each of the said 

7 larger customars and 3 smaller customars shall have his beasts 
going in the demesne lands after the corn is carried up to the feast 
of St.]Martin, so that each ox or cow having 2 animal teeth \_denles 
aial~\ or more, except one beast which he shall have quit, shall 
plough one acre at the winter sowing and one acre to lie fallow, 
and they shall have this year 8 beasts for which they shall plough 

8 acres, and the ploughing of each acre is worth 2d.: sum, i6d. 
The said 7 larger customars and 3 smaller customars who ought to 
reap in the autumn shall have of the best corn of the manor of the 
land not manured, half an acre of barley and half an acre of oats 



372 Wiltshire 

after the reaping of the corn of the meadow by delivery of the 
bailiff. 

Sum-total, £ii 13^. i|</. 

The said lands and tenements are held of the Earl of Lincoln by 
the service of the moiety of one knight's fee. 

[Heirs as in previous Inquisition.] 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward II, No. 80. 



faroof of age of Cl^omajS, 0on ant) l^eir of 
^larin ilfiautiut, 

'root of age of Thomas, son and heir of Warin Maudut, 



P 



deceased, who held of the King Edward, father of the now 
King in chief, taken at Wermenstre before the King's escheator 
17th November, 2 Edward II [1308 J, by the oath of the under- 
written. 

Peter son of Warin, knight, sexagenarian, sworn and examined 
as to the age of the said Thomas son of Warin, says that the said 
heir was aged 21 years on the feast of St. Kalixtus last past, and 
this he knows because the said heir was born at Mount Gomeri in 
the feast of St. Kalixtus, 15 Edward I [1287], and was baptized 
in the church there on the morrow of the said feast, and the said 
Watin, the father of the said heir, came to Wermenstre on the 
15th day after the birth of the said heir, on which day he gave 
a banquet, at which the said Peler was present, and the said 
Warin asked the said Peter to bear witness to the day and year of 
the birth of the said heir when he should come to his full age, and 
by this he knows that so long a time has elapsed. 

Robert de Lucy, knight, aged 60, Nicholas . . . aged 50, 
Nicholas Malmeyns, aged 70, William . . . aged 50, Robert 
Plukenet, of the same age, John de Bracton, aged 60, Reginald le 
Theyn, aged 60, Roger Alar mion, of the same age, Elias Deverel, aged 
50, Robert de Whiteclyve, aged 60, and Reginald Stwale, aged 70, say 
as above as to the age of the said heir. It was made known by John 
Botiler and Robert Maudut at Wermenistre to Robert son of Pagan, 
who has the custody of the lands and tenements of the said heir, 
that he should be present to show if he had or knew anything to 
say for himself why he should not deliver to the said heir the lands 
and tenements which are of his inheritance : which said Robert on 
the day given to him did not come. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 2 Edward II, No. 94. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 373 



-w- • • • 

I nCJUlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator in co. Wilts, 
A 7th October, 3 Edward II [1309], of the lands and tene- 
ments of the which John Slyne, idiot, was seised on the day that 
he died in co. Wilts, by the oath of Walter de Lange/ord, Peter 
Portebref, Adam Barbost, John de Langejord, Robert de W . . . 
Walter Chaumberlayn, Thomas Welound, William de Berewik, Richard 
de Mantone, Reginald de Hyweye, John de Chi . . and Richard 
de Hyweye, who say that 

John Slyne, idiot, died seised of 2 parts of one messuage and one 
acre of land in Draicote Foliot, which are worth per annum 4J. %d. ; 
and of 60 acres of land there which are worth per annum 40J., 
price of the acre %d. : the said lands are held of Sir Henry Tyeys 
in chief by the service of doing 2 suits at his court of Dreicote by 
the year. Sum, 44J. 8</. 

Ralph Styne, brother of Roger Styne, father of the said John, is 
the uncle and next heir of the said John, and is aged 60 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 3 Edward II, No. 2. 



iRobert De Cljont* 

InC^UlSltlOn. taken before the King's escheator at New 
Sarum loth December, 3 Edward II [1309], of the lands and 
tenements which were o{ Robert de Thony on the day that he died, 
in CO. Wilts, by the oath of Richard le Warner, John de Jllolyns, 
Thomas le Chaumberleynk, Henry le Freye, William le Jeuvene, John 
son of Elias, Philip the Clerk of Neuton, Richard Gozver, Henry de 
Lemynton, Thoinas atte Halle, Peter de Stretjord, and Johfi atte Stone, 
who say that 

The said Robert de Thony on the day that he died held nothing 
of the King in chief in the said county, but he held the manor of 
Stretford in the same county of the Earl of Leycestre by the service 
of half a knight's fee : which said manor is worth per annum, clear, 

;;^I5 OS. %d. 

The said Robert held also the manor of Neuton in the said 
county of the Earl of Herejord by the service of half a knight's 
fee, which said manor is worth per annum, clear, £\t iis. \od. 



374 Wiltshire 

Alice, who was the wife of Sir Thomas de Leyhoume, deceased, is 
the sister and heir of the said Robert de Thony, and is aged 25 years 
and more. 

[In the Inquisition of the lands of the said Robert de Thony in 
Norfolk mention is made of Matilda, his wife, and Ralph de To?ty^ 
his father]. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 3 Edward II, No. 33. 



iHattl^etD 0on of gioljn* 

InC[UlSltlOn and extent of the lands and tenements of the 
which Matthew son of John formerly enfeoffed the lord 
Edward, formerly King of England, father of the now King, made 
at Erlestok before the King's escheator on the 15th day of August, 
3 Edward II [1309], by the oath of Peter de Bulkynton, William 
Musard, Henry Vygenis, Richard de Abervile, Walter de la Chambre, 
John Ruisel, John Beneyt, John Kykeman, John Eltyne, Robert de 
Hunton, Thomas de Chymin, and John the Clerk, who say that 

The said Matthew enfeoffed the said King Edward of the manor 
of Erlestoke : which manor is in the hand of Sir John de Weston, 
junior, by commission of the now King made to the said Sir Johf, 
after the death of the said Matthav. 

There is there a certain messuage with a curtilage and garden, 
and the easements of the houses and the herbage with the fruit of 
the orchards are worth per annum \%s.\ also a dovecote, and it is 
worth per annum is. There arc there 210 acres of arable land on 
the hill, and they are worth per annum £\ 15^-., of 60 acres 
whereof the price of each acre is %d., and of 30 acres the price of 
each acre is bd., and of 120 acres the price per acre is \d.\ also 
250 acres of land on the hill, and they are worth per annum 
41J. %d., price of the acre zd, ; also 80 acres of meadow, and they 
are worth per annum £%, price of the acre 2^. There is there 
a certain pasture in common* in the marsh, and it is worth per 
annum \s.', also another pasture which i's called Pudenhulle in 
severalty, besides that 'Walter de Camera shall have common in the 
same pasture with 11 oxen and one plough horse, and 8 pigs, viz , 
from the feast of the Invention of Holy Cross up to the feast of 
St. Martin, and with the said plough horse further up to the feast 
of the Purification, and with the said pigs throughout the whole 
year. And Thomas Averay shall have common there in the same 
way with 4 oxen and one plough horse and 4 pigs, and the profit 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 375 

of that pasture is worth per annum loj. There is there another 
several pasture on the hill for 600 sheep, and the profit of that 
pasture is worth per annum 50J. ; also a certain grove, and the 
profit of that wood and the herbage are worth per annum 6j. %d. 

There are there 10 free tenants who pay per annum £\ os. zd. at 
the said 4 terms, and one of them pays at the feast of St. Michael 
I lb. of cummin, price \d. 

There are there i r virgators, each of whom holds one virgate of 
land containing 24 acres, and they pay per annum at the said terms 
£\ \^s. id., and each of them shall do between the feast of 
St. Michael and the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 38 works, which 
are worth ig^,, price of the work \d., and between the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist and the gule of August 17 works, and they are 
worth 8^(/., price of the work \d., and from the gule of August up 
to the feast of St. Michael 34 works, and they are worth zs. lod., 
price of the work id. Sum of the value of the works of the said 11 
virgators per annum, 56^. ^.^d. 

There are there 28 half virgators who pay per annum 1165-. iid. 
at the said terms, and each of them shall do between the feast of 
St. Michael and the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 38 
works, which are worth igd., price of the work ^d., and between the 
Nativity aforesaid and the gule of August 17 works, which are 
worth Shd., price of the work ^d., and from the gule of August up 
to the feast of St. Michael 34 works, and they are worth zs. lod., 
price of the work id. Sum of the value of the works of the said 28 
half virgators by the year, £1 ^s.^ 6d. 

There are there 24 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and 
they pay per annum 42^. jd., at the said 4 terms : 20 of the said 
cottars shall each do small works or shall pay to the lord at the 
feast of St. Michael zd. Sum of the value of the works of the said 
19 cottars 3^. zd. ; and one of the said cottars shall work for 16 
days in the autumn, and the works are worth i6d., price of the 
work id.; and the remaining cottars shall do no works. Sum of 
the value of the works of the said 20 cottars, 4^. 6d. And all the 
said virgators, half virgators, and cottars shall give to the lord of 
the said manor at the feast of St. Dionisius ^os. ; also at the feast 
of St. Martin for chersete 6s. Sd. The pleas and perquisites of the 
court are worth per annum 20J'. 

JIugk de Carsivell holds in Hyatesbury 16 acres of land for the 
term of his life which he had of the demise and grant of the said 
Matthew son of John, before he enfeoff"ed the said King Edward, 
and he pays therefor per annum lo^. to Thomas Averay at the 
feast of St. Michael. The said Thomas Averay holds certain lands 



2,^^ Wiltshire 

and li virgate of land and one water-mill of the demesnes of the 
said manor, which pay now per annum 6^-., which are accounted for 
above among the freepien which were wont to pay at the time at 
which he enfeoffed the said King of the said manor 33^. 4</. : the 
said Thomas has confirmation of the lord Edward, formerly King of 
England, father of the now King. 

Sum of the value of the whole of the manor aforesaid by the 
year, £s^ 1 3X. 2d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 3 Edward II, No. 49. 



iJfiattl^etx) 0on of Slol^tt. 

Extent of the knight's fees and advowsons of churches 
which were of Matthew son of John, made at Erlestoke 
before the King's escheator 15th August, 3 Edward II [1309], by 
the oath of Peter de Bulkmton, William Musard, Hetiry Vigerus, 
Richard de Abervyle, Walter de la Chaumbre, John Russel, John 
Beneyt, John Kykeman, John Eleyne, Robert de Hunto7i, Thomas de 
Chinoun, ^.ndjohn Clericus, who say that 

The said Matthtiv held on the day that he died half a knight's 
fee in Hyatesbury belonging to the manor of Erlestoke, of which 
said half fee the said Matthtw enfeoffed the lord the King, 
together with the manor of Erlestoke, of which said half fee 
Henry de Hertham holds the tenth part of one knight's fee in 
Hyatesbury in demesne, and pays nothing and does nothing 
except suit at court at Hyatesbury. Roger de Sumerjord holds in 
the same town the fourth part of half a knight's fee in demesne, 
and pays nothing and does nothing except suit at the court of 
Hyatesbury. William de Hampton holds in the same town the sixth 
part of half a knight's fee, and pays nothing and does nothing 
except suit at the said court. Robert de Alritilon holds in the said 
town the fifth part of a knight's fee, and pays nothing and does 
nothing except suit at the said court. 

The said Matthew had no advowson of the church in the said 
manor. 

Chaji. Inq. p.m., 3 Edward II, No. 49. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 377 

mtlUam le "^yx^n^ 9lDiot. 

T • • • 

I nqUlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator at Doutone 
A in CO. Wilts, 4th May, 4 Edward II [131 1], by the oath of 
John de Fade, Robert Giliberd, William Aunger, Jolm Charles, William 
le Coue, Walter le Warde, Ralph Druwet, John in la Lane, John le 
Frye, Ralph Grugge, John alte Mulle, and Richard le Warener, who 
say that 

William le Diiyn held on the day that he died at Stanlyngho 
in the said county of the Bishop of Wijichesterh^ knight's service, 
according to the quantity of the tenement, one messuage, and it is 
worth with the easement of the houses per annum 4^. bd. 

John Charles, free tenant, pays per annum half a pound of pepper, 
and it is worth per annum dd. 

There are there 6 half virgators, each of whom pays per annum 
5^., sum 305-. ; and each of them shall plough and harrow at each 
sowing one acre of land, and they shall go to the lord's table at 
the cost of the lord, or they ought to take of the lord for each acre 
4</., and the work of each acre is worth to the lord's profit id., 
sum 2^. Each of them shall carry the lord's hay in autumn with 
one horse and cart, and they shall go to the lord's table. And they 
ought to take each day 2 sheaves of wheat or barley of such corn 
as they shall carry in the day's work, and the work of each of them 
is worth to the lord's profit id. : sum, iid. Each of them shall 
reap the lord's corn for 2 days for a day's work, and they shall go 
to the lord's table, and the work of each is worth id. : sum, iid. 
Each of them shall give for chersete one cock and 3 hens, and the 
chersete of each is worth j^d. : sum, 25-. There are there 2 cottagers, 
each of which pays per annum i zd. at the 4 terms of the year. 

The said William held on the day that he died 87 acres of arable 
land, 30 acres whereof are worth per annum 5^., price of the acre 
id., and 20 acres on the Chelkhulle are worth per annum lod., and 
30 acres are upon la Stoniebrerhche and upon the Sondyhulle, and 
they are worth per annum, according to the true value, z^., and 
7 acres are upon Otland, and they are worth per annum yd. There 
are there 6 acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum bs. ; 
also 5 acres of wood lying waste, and they are worth per annum iid. 
There is there a certain several pasture which contains 1 1 acres by 
measure, and they are worth per annum is. bd. 

John le Duyn, son of the said William le Duyn, idiot, is his next 
heir, and is aged 45 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward II, No. ig. 



^yS Wiltshire 



Jol^n Jlobel of C^ljmerjsc]^, 

InC[UlSltlOn taken before the King's escheator 7th Nov., 
4 Edward II [13 10], of the lands and tenements of the 
which John Lovel of Tychmersch was seised in his demesne as 
of fee on the day that he died, how much he held of the King and 
how much of others, etc., etc., by the oath of John Torny, Petet 
Bluet, John Az, Nicholas Dymars, Thomas Daundel}', John de 
Basynges, John de Chillone, Richard Aylmer^ William de Mirorles, 
James de Grundwell, Roger de Thornhull, and Reginald Waz, who 
say that 

John Lovel of Tychmersch was seised in his demesne as of fee 
on the day that he died of the manor of Elecombe. 

There is there one capital messuage with gardens and closes, 
and it is worth per annum lis. There are there 124 acres of 
arable land, price of the acre j^d \ also 116 acres of arable land, 
price of the acre id. ; also 26 acres of meadow, price of the acre 
IS. There is there a several pasture which is worth per annum 
15^., also a pasture for sheep which is worth per annum bs. Sd. 
There are there 2 free tenants, one of whom holds one virgate of 
land, paying therefor per annum i lb. of cummin at the feast of 
St. Michael, price id. ; and the other holds there half a virgate of 
land, paying per annum 5^. at the 4 principal terms. 

There are there 27 customars each of whom pays per annum $s. 
at the said 4 terms of custom for rent and works. There is there 
one windmill, and it is worth per annum one mark. The pleas and 
perquisites with view of frank-pledge are worth per annum 4^. 

The said manor is held of Alan la Zouche, as parcel of the 
Earldom of Wirichesler by the service of half a knight's fee. 

Sum of the said manor of Elecombe, ^15 ^s. qd. 

He also held the manor of Bluntesdone Bay oi John Mautravers, 
by the service of one knight's fee. 

There is there one capital messuage which is worth per annum 
\id. There are there 120 acres of arable land, price of the acre 
3^. ; also 6 acres of meadow, price is. There are there 6 free 
tenants, one of whom holds half a virgate of land, paying per 
annum ']s. at the 4 principal terms of the year. Also one free 
tenant holds there one virgate of land, paying per annum zos. at 
the said terms. There are there 3 free tenants, each of whom 
holds half a virgate of land, paying therefor per annum "js. at the 



tnquisitiones Post Mortem. 379 

said terms ; also 2 free tenants each of whom holds the fourth part 
of one virgate of land and pays at the said terms 4^. One free 
tenant holds one virgate of land, paying at the said terms ^d. 

There is there one water-mill and it is worth per annum 2o.f. 

John Lovel granted the said manor of Bluntesdone to William 
Chapman to farm 2 years ago at the feast of St. Michael : to hold 
for the term of 10 years for money in hand paid. Sum of . . . 

John Lovely son of the said John Lovel of Tychmersch is his next 
heir, and is aged 21 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward II, A'^o. 33. 



^Imaricuje; tie ^ancto ^mantio, 

InnUlSltlOn taken before the King's cscheator on this side 
the Trent, loth September, 4 Edward II [13 10]. by the oath 
oi Robert de Holepuite, William de la More, John son of William, John 
le Blake, Thomas D icon, John Pouie, Henry le Sancer, Philip J\Iatchaunt, 
Thomas le Nywe, Elias Byde, Richard de London, and Waller Henvard, 
who say that 

Almaricus de Sancto Amando died seised in his demesne as of fee 
at Wamberge of one messuage and one curtilage, which are worth 
per annum 6^. %d. There are there free tenants, viz., Williavi atte 
More, who holds half a virgate of land, paying per annum at the 
feast of St. Michael 3^., and he owes suit from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. 

John atte Brugge holds one virgate of land and a half, paying per 
annum \\s. Sd., viz., at the feast of St. Michael io,r. and at the 
feast of St. Thomas the Apostle lod., and he owes suit as above. 

Elias Byde holds half a virgate of land and one water-mill, paying 
per annum gs., viz., at the feast of the Nativity of St. John 4^'. and 
at the feast of St. Michael 55-., and he owes suit as above. 

William Bryan holds half a virgate of land, paying at the feast of 
St. Michael 3^., and he owes suit as above. 

Roger de Thornhill holds half a virgate of land, paying per annum 
at the 4 principal terms of the year \s. zd. by equal portions, and 
owes suit as above. 

Thomas atte Nellere holds half a virgate of land, paying per annum 
at the feast of St. Michael y. 6d. and at the feast of St. Thomas 
the Apostle iid., and he owes suit. 



380 Win shire 

Richard de London holds half a virgate of land, paying per annum 
5^., viz., at the feast of St. Michael zs. td. and at the feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary zs. bd., and he owes suit, etc. 

John Chaumpeneys holds one piece of meadow, paying per annum 
at the feast of St. Thomas the Apostle 3J. for all service. 

John Elys holds one piece of land in his close, paying per annum 
at the feast of St. Michael 3^. for all service. 

There is there one windmill, and it is worth per annum \y. \d. 
Sum, bzs. id. 

Natives. 

There are there 5 half virgators who hold in villeinage, each of 
whom pays per annum is. T,d., viz., at the feast of St. Thomas the 
Apostle i^d., at the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary 
i^d., and at the feast of St. John the Baptist i^d. : sum, i6j. 3^. 
And each of them shall do between the feast of the Nativity of 
St. John and the gule of August 3 works in the week, viz., on 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, unless they shall be festival days, 
and the day's work is worth \d., sum bs. ^d.; and from the gule 
of August up to the feast of St. Michael the whole week except 
Saturday, and if they do not work each of them shall give i^d., 
sum 43.r. 4^. And each of them shall give at the feast of 
St. Martin for chersete 3 hens and i cock, price of the hen i^d., 
and of the cock id. : sum, ^s. 4^^. Sum, bys. i^d. There is there 
one half virgator who holds one croft, paying per annum ^s. at the 
feasts of the Annunciation of the Blessed i\Iary and of St. Michael 
by equal portions. Also one cottar who holds one cottage, paying 
per annum zs. at the 4 principal terms. 

There are there 130 acres of arable land, each acre whereof is 
worth per annum ^d. : sum, 43^. ^d. Also 22 acres of meadow, 
price of the acre zs. There is there pasture for oxen which is 
worth per annum 28^-. zd. ; also pasture for sheep worth per annum 
zs. The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum zs. 

The said tenement is held of the Earl of Lincoln for the fourth 
part of one knight's fee, to be paid at the feast of St. Thomas 
the Apostle. 

Sum, £iz lbs. z\d., whereof in rent resolute to the Earl of 
Lincoln bs. 8d., and so the sum is, clear, £iz Ss. b^d. 

Mdister /oh n de S/. Amando is the brother and next heir of the 
said Almaricus, and is of full age. 

Chan. Lnq.p.m., 4 Edward J L, No. 42. 



E 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 381 

XtCnt of the lands and tenements of the which William 
Rtissel was seised on the day that he died in co. Wilts, 
before the King's escheator on this side the Trent, at Marleberge, 
24th February, 4 Edward II [131 1], viz., how much he held of the 
King in chief and how much of others, etc., etc., by the oath of 
John de Slocke, John Fraunkelayn, William Parler, John atte Knolle, 
William de Tymerigge, John de Woltone, John aite Knolle, William de 
Knolle, Edward le Vrmongere, Ralph Em, Hugh taillur, and John 
Belle, who say that 

The said William was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day 
that he died of one capital messuage and 2 carucates of land in 
Estbedewynde which are held of the King in chief by serjeanty, 
but they do not know by what service. There is there a capital 
messuage with the easement of other houses and with a garden 
and dovecote which is worth per annum 19J. Also 128 acres of 
arable land which are worth per annum 21J. \d., price of the acre 
zd. ; also 6 acres of meadow which are worth per annum <^s., price 
of the acre i8^. ; also 12 acres of pasture, worth per annum 4^., 
price of the acre \d. There is there one wood, the pasture 
whereof is common, and it contains 40 acres, the profit whereof is 
worth per annum \id., and not more because it is in the forest. 
Also one water-mill worth per annum one mark. 

There are there free tenants, of whom William Parler pays 
per annum 5J. at the 4 principal terms by equal portions, and 
owes suit from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. Johnde Yldesle pays per annum 
\\d. at the said 4 terms by equal portions, and owes suit as above 
from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. John Sewyne pays per annum 8^. at the 
said terms. Richard Stroky pays per annum 12^. at the said terms 
and owes suit as above. Walter Bake pays per annum lod. at the 
said terms for all service. Stephen Bakere pays per annum 2^. at 
the said terms. Margery Horwode pays per annum y. at the said 
terms for all service. Cristina de Burwode pays per annum 25J. at 
the said terms and owes suit from 3 weeks to 3 weeks. John Semor 
pays per annum 4^. 4</. at the said 4 terms. 

There are there 2 virgators, each of whom pays per annum for 
rent and works at the said 4 terms qs. 

Also 5 holding in villeinage, each of whom holds the third part of 
one virgate, and they pay 20s. at the said 4 terms by equal portions. 
The said villeins give yearly of custom at the feast of St. Dionisius 
half a mark. Chersete there at the feast of St. Martin is 7 cocks and 
21 hens, price per head \d. Sum, ^7 "js. Hd. 



382 Wiltshire 

The said William held at la Knolle one capital messuage with 
the easements of the other houses and the dovecote, which is 
worth per annum 6j, %d. There are there 120 acres of arable land 
which are worth per annum 20J., price of the acre zd. There is 
there a certain several pasture which contains 6 acres, and is 
worth per annum \%d., price of the acre 3<i. ; also a grove which 
contains 8 acres, the profit whereof is worth per annum 2J., and not 
more because it is in the forest. There are there 6 cottars who 
pay per annum at 2 terms \\s. ^d., viz., at the feasts of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary and St. Michael by equal 
portions. 

The said tenement is held of Sir Henry de Cokeham in socage, 
paying to the said Henry at the feast of St. Michael 4J., and for 
assarts at that feast i \d. 

Sum, \\s. $d., whereof to Henry de Cokeham for rent 4^. \\d. 
Sum, clear, 365'. bd. 

Teobald Russel is the son and next heir of the said William, and 

is aged 12 years. 

Chan. Itiq. p.m., 4 Edivard II, No. 49. 



l^enr^ tie Lac^, €ari of Itncoln. 

Extent of the lands and tenements of the which Henry de 
Lacy, late Earl of Lincoln, was seised on the day that he 
died in co. Wilts, made at Merleberge before the King's escheator 
on this side the Trent, 24th February, 4 Edward II [131 1], viz., 
how much the said Henry held of the King in chief and how much 
of others, by the oath of William Warde, William Walrand, Adam 
de Burnesdeti, John Kytruoyne, Richard de Camera, Thomas de 
Ganesdon, Waltir de Tacham, Stephen Bearman, Henry le Templer, 
Henry le Iresse, John Atte Grove, and Philip de Stanhurjie, who 
say that 

Aldeborne. 

The said Henry held the manor of Aldeborne by the law of 
England of the inheritance of Margaret, formerly his wife, of the 
King in chief by knight's service, and it belongs to the Earldom of 
Sarum. There is there one messuage with a garden , and the 
easements of the other houses, which is worth per annum 6s., and 
a dovecote which is worth per annum 45-. There are there 306 
acres of arable land which are worth per annum 76^^. bd., price of 
the acre ^d. ; also 80 acres of meadow lying in Wanbrogh and they 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 383 

belong to the said manor, which are worth per annum £%, price of 
the acre is. There is there a several pasture for 24 oxen, which is 
worth per annum \bs., price per head M., and pasture for 500 
sheep which is worth per annum 41J. 8^., price per head \d. 
There is there one park, the profit whereof is nothing on account 
of the wild beasts, and otherwise it would be worth zos. And 
there is another foreign wood, which is worth per annum loj. 
Also a windmill, which is worth per annum 20J. Sum of the issues 
of the manor, £\'^ 4^. id. 

There are there free tenants who pay per annum at the Nativity 
of the Lord, Easter, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and at 
the feast of St. Michael by equal portions ^23 4^. \i\d. There is 
a certain rent of 4 marks in Bradne belonging to the said manor, 
and it ought to be paid at the said terms by equal portions. Sum' 

;^2S \%S. 7,\d. 

There are there 21 customars, each of whom holds one virgate 
of land, and they pay per annum at the said terms 105J., and their 
works are worth per annum £i, ss. ^d. Also 8 customars, each of 
whom holds half a virgate of land, and they pay per annum at the 
said terms 24^., and their works are worth per annum 2o.r. M. All 
the said customars shall give to the lord's larder zos. at the feast 
of St. Michael. Sum of the rent of the customars and of the value 
of their works, ;i{^i 2 15^. id. 

There is there a certain market on Thursday which is worth per 
annum 26^. ^d. The pleas and perquisites of the court of the said 
manor are worth 40J. Sum of the value of the market and the 
perquisites of the court, 66s. Sd. 

Sum of the whole manor, £-jo ^s. zhd. 

Trebrigge. 
The said ffavy held on the day that he died the manor of 
Trebrigge by the law of England of the inheritance of Marrrarc/ 
formerly his wife, of the King in chief, by knight's service, a*nd i[ 
belongs to the Earldom of Sarum. There is there one capital 
messuage with a garden and the easements of the other houses, 
and it is worth per annum 6.r. 8^., and one dovecote which is worth 
per annum 6s. 8d .There are there 214 acres of arable land 
which are worth per annum ju. 4^.; also 37 acres of meadow! 
which are worth per annum 74X., price of the acre zs. There is 
there a several pasture, which is worth per annum 13^. 4^. There 
are there 40 acres of wood, which are worth per annum 6s. Sd, and 
not more because it is common and there is no underwood. Sum 
£8 18s. 8d. 



384 Wiltshire 

There are there free tenants who pay per annum at the said 
4 terms by equal portions £16 is. gd. Sum, ;^i6 is. gd. 

Also 10 customars, each of whom holds one virgate of land, and 
they pay per annum at the said terms by equal portions ;^ii, and 
their works are worth per annum 60s. ; also 15 customars, each of 
whom holds half a virgate of land, and they pay per annum at the 
said terms 6o5'., and their works are worth per annum los. i\d.', 
also 15 cottars, who pay per annum at the said terms 10s. Sum 
of the rent of the customars and the valuQ of their works, 
£1 3 los. 8i</. 

The pleas and perquisites of the intrinsic court of the said 
manor are worth per annum 305'., and of the forensic court ibs. Sd. 
There is there a certain market on Saturday, which is worth per 
annum 50J. Sum of the perquisites of the court and the value of 
the market, 1065-. 8^. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor, £^i 8s. ghd. 

Wynterborne. 

The said Henry also held the manor of Wynterborne by the law 
of England of the inheritance of Margaret, formerly his wife, of 
the King in chief, by knight's service, and it belongs to the 
Earldom of Sarum. There is in the said manor a certain messuage 
with a garden and the easements of the other houses, and it is 
worth per annum 6j. %d. There are there 200 acres of arable land, 
which are worth per annum 50^., price of the acre ^d. ; also 
15 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 305-., price of the 
acre is. The pasture there is worth per annum 10s. bd. Sum, 
107J. id. 

There are there free tenants, who pay per annum is. id. in the 
morrow of Easter. There is there a certain rent of £\, forthcoming 
from Colemor and Melchet, belonging to the said manor, and it 
ought to be paid by equal portions at the feasts of the Nativity 
of the Lord, Easter, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist and 
St. Michael. Sum, £^ is. id. 

There are there 10 half virgators, each of whom pays per annum 
at the said 4 terms by equal portions 30J. ; also 13 cottars, who pay 
per annum at the said terms 135-. for all customs. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court of the said manor are 
worth per annum ts. Sd., and the pleas and perquisites of the 
hundred of Alwardbury belonging to this manor are worth per 
annum 33J. ^d. Sum, £^ Ss. 

Sum of the whole value of the manor, £1^ iSs. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 385 

Ambresbury. 

The said Henry also held on the day that he died the manor of 
Ambresbury by the law of England, of the inheritance of Margaret, 
formerly his wife, of the King in chief, by knight's service, and 
it belongs to the Earldom of Sarum. There is there one messuage 
with the easements of the other houses, and it is worth per annum 
6J. There are there 300 acres of arable land, which are worth per 
annum 75^., price of the acre 3^/. ; also 5 acres qf meadow, worth 
per annum 15^., price of the acre is. ; also 40 acres of wood, the 
profit whereof is worth per annum 20^., and not more because it is 
in the forest. There is there pasture for 24 oxen, and it is worth 
per annum i6j., price per head 8^.; also pasture for 800 sheep, 
which is worth per annum 66j. 8</., price per head \d. Sum, 
£<) ijs. M. 

There are there free tenants, who pay per annum at the feasts of 
the Nativity of the Lord, Easter, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 
and St. Michael, by equal portions, £1"] gs. bd. Sum, £1"] gs. bd. 

There are there 6 virgators, each of whom holds one virgate of 
land, and they pay per annum at the said terms bos. for all service ; 
also 13 half virgators, who pay per annum at the said terms 50J. ; 
also 15 cottars, who pay at the said terms equally izs. bd. Sum, 
£-] lis. bd. 

The pleas and perquisites of the court of the said manor are 
worth per annum 20s., and those of the hundred of Ambresbury 
belonging to the said manor £^ ; and those of the court of 
Selveneton belonging to the said manor are worth per annum 
lbs. %d. Sum, £b bs. Sd. 

Sum-total of the manor of Ambresbury, ^53. 

The said Henry was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day 
that he died of a certain tenement within the manor of Ambresbury, 
which he acquired of Everard Tyays, who held that tenement 
formerly of the Earl of Sarum. 

There is there one messuage with a garden and the easements 
of the other houses, and it is worth per annum bs. %d. 

There are there 200 acres of arable land, which are worth per 
annum 50J., price of the acre id. ; also 3 acres of meadow, which 
are worth per annum qt., price of the acre is. There is there 
pasture for 16 oxen, which is worth per annum \bs., price per 
head \id. ; also for 400 sheep, which is worth per annum 33.r. \d., 
price per head \d. There is there a certain water-mill, which is 
worth per annum 40J. 

There are there 3 virgators, who pay per annum at the said terms 

WILTS INQ. — VOL. II. 25 

2 6 



386 Wiltshire 

equally tos. ; also 5 cottars, who pay at the same terms I'js. for all 
service. Sum, £iz "js. 

Alice, wife of Thomas de Lancaster, daughter of the said Henry 
and Margaret, is their next heir, and. is aged 24 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 4 Edward II, No. 51. 



^^eter He 'BretDojsa^ 

InCJlllSltlOn taken before the King's escheator in co. 
Wilts 20th April, 5 Edward II [13 12], by the oath o{ Richard 
le Bemer, John atte Mulle, John Potent, John atte Mershmulle, Peter le 
Heir, Edmund Chuse, John Clarice, Richard atte Watere, William 
Edmund, Richard Skillyng, James Derle, and William Durdant, who 
say that 

The manor of Manyngeford Brewose is held of the Earl of 
Hertford belonging to the constabulary of England, and that Mary 
le Brewosahzs the manor of Manyngford of the grant of Sir Peter 
de Brewosa in the name of dower happening to her in the vills of 
Tettebury and Manyngeford by the death of Sir William de 
Brewosa, formerly her husband. 

Sir Peter de Brewosa was seised of 2 parts of the said manor on 
the day on which he married Agnes his wife. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward II, No. 27. 



9)0l)n Cl^atlejJ* 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at New Sarum before the King's 
X escheator, 20th October, 5 Edward II [131 1], of the lands 
and tenements which John Charles some time acquired in 
Cherletone in co. Wilts, by the oath of John de Wodefande, Ralph 
Druet, Ralph le Ferror, William le Draper, John de Farle, Robert 
Gilberd, John de Harnham, John Martyn, John Elys, William le 
Yonge, Henry le Frye, and John de Stratford, who say that 

William le Duyn while he lived held of the inheritance of 
Cristiana, his wife, in Cherletone by the law of England one 
messuage and half a virgate of land, of which said half virgate of 
land the said William demised to William Charles, father of John 
Charles that now is, 8 acres of land, to hold together with thg said 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 387 

messuage of the said William le Duyn to the said William Charles^ 
whether in fee or for a term of years the jurors know not, and so 
after the death of the said William Charles the said John Charles 
his son, by fine made with the said William Duyn, had entry into 
the said messuage and land, and still holds them. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward II, No. 37. 



Writ dated at Berwick-on-Tweed 12th July, 5 Edward II [131 0* 
[No Inquisition for Wilts.] 

Extent of the knight's fees which were oi Nicholas Poyntz, 
who held of the King, and which by reason of his death 
are taken into the King's hand, viz., 3 parts of one knight's fee 
which the Abbot of Bynedon holds in pure and perpetual alms in 
Bovyngton in co. Wilts, and which are extended at ;^io. 

The moiety of one knight's fee which James de Norton and 
William Saffray hold in Fissherton and Babington in the said 
county, and which is extended per annum at £iz. 

The twelfth part of one knight's fee which Robert de Farendon 
holds in Rudeweye in the said county, and which is extended 
at looi'. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward II, No. 62. 



iBartl^olometr) De 'Batieleieimere anD i^argaret 

I nqUlSltlOn taken at New Sarum 26th May, 4 Edward II 
X [131 1], before the King's escheator, by the oath o( Robert le 
Bor, Robert de Whiteclyve, John Daleny, Adam le Foghel, Peter le 
Here, John Chinnok, John Struges, senior, William le Carpenter, 
Arnulph DaggolJ, John de Depejord, John Adam, and Robert Fygrous, 
how much the manors of Heghtredebiry, Colern, Storte, and 



388 Wiltshire 

Herdecote, together with certain lands in the said manor of 
Heghtredebiry which Bartholomew de Badelesmere acquired to him- 
self and his heirs of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and 
Hertford, together with knight's fees and advowsons of churches to 
the said manors belonging, are worth per annum in all issues, who 
say that 

In Heghtredebery there is one court with a garden and dovecote 
and easements of houses, and they are worth per annum 30^. 
There is also in the said manor of rent of freemen and customars 
as well of Heghtredebery as of Tuderington £zi lys. 2d., i lb. of 
pepper and 3 lbs. of cummin, price iSd. The Abbess of Romesey 
gives to have a certain chase, one fleece, one lamb, and one 
cheese, price lod. The toll of the market with stallage is worth 
per annum i%s. ^d. The perquisites of the court of the said 
market are worth per annum 40J. There are there fairs at the 
feast of the Invention of Holy Cross, and they are worth per annum 
33^. 4</. There are there 2 water-mills, and they are worth per 
annum bos. The fishing of the water is worth per annum 7^. 
The pleas and perquisites of the court of the manor, with wards, 
reliefs, heriots, and sales of lands, are worth per annum £'j. The 
pannage of pigs is worth per annum is. bd. The capitage of boys 
is worth per annum 3^. There is there a certain pasture for 800 
sheep, which is worth with the pasturing down of the said sheep 
£10. There is there a wood containing 200 acres, which is worth 
per annum as in pasture and sale of underwood 30^'. The tallage of 
bondmen as well of Heghtredebiry as of Tuderyngton is worth per 
annum zbs. Sd. The pleas and perquisites of the hundred are 
worth per annum £S. Sum, ;^6o i is. zd. 

The works of 7 tenants in Heghtredebiry between the feast of 
St. Michael and the gule of August, viz., for 43 weeks and 3 days, 
except the weeks of Christmas and Pentecost, and 8 festival days 
within the said time, are worth 33^. lod. ; and between the gule of 
August and the feast of St. Michael for 8 weeks and 4 days, except 
3 festival days, within the said time, are worth zos. \\d. Also of 2 
of the said tenants for their faldage iid. The works of 14 tenants 
in Tuteryngton between the feast of St. Michael and the gule of 
August are worth £b \os., and between the gule of August and 
the feast of St. Michael they are worth 57J. %d. The ploughings 
and harrowings and other small works of the said 14 tenants 
beyond the allowance of the work are worth per annum 30J. The 
works of 2 tenants in Tuderyngton beyond the allowance of 
work are worth per annum i^d. The said customars as well of 
Heghtredebiry as of Tuderyngton owe at the feast of St. Martin 41 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 389 

hens, and they are worth 3J. 5^. They shall give at the feast of 
Easter 245 eggs, and they are worth 7^. Sum, £\i lys. Sid. 

There are there in the demesne of arable land 580 acres, half 
a rod and 4 perches, measured by perches, which are worth per 
annum ^24, price of the acre 10^., less 40J. in the whole ; also of 
meadow that may be mown 38 acres, which are worth per annum 
^4 i$s. There are no advowsons of churches or knight's fees 
belonging to the said manor. Sum, ;^28 15^. 

The land formerly of the Earl of Gloucester in the said vill is 
one court with a curtilage and garden and dovecote, and they 
are worth per annum zos. There is also in the said manor of 
rent of freemen, customars, and cottars, as in Heghtredebiry, 
Hornyngesham, and Anstygh, £ \ \s. 9^/., and i lb. of .cummin, 
price \d. The pleas and perquisites of the court are worth per 
annum 30J. with fines and capitage. There is there a several 
pasture for sheep and oxen, together with pasture in the field of 
Suthene and pasture in the park of Hornyngham, and it is worth 
per annum with the profit of the park i i6j. 

The works of the said customars are worth per annum ^\s. i\d: 
The said customars shall give at the feast of St. Martin 68 hens, 
and the money shall be charged in the said works. 

There are there in the demesne of arable land 460 acres, which 
are worth per annum £\<^ ^s. \d. ; also of mean that may be mown 
at Heghtred' and Horningham 17!^ acres i rood, which are worth 
per annum 525-. dd. 

There are no advowsons of churches or knight's fees belonging 
to the said land. Sum, £ i^ \s, \o\d. 

COLERNE. 

There is in the manor of Colerne one court with a curtilage and 
garden and other easements, and they are worth per annum \os. 
There is in the said manor of rent of freemen and customars 
£c) 6s. 6d., I lb. of pepper, 4 lbs. of cummin; price i6d., 2 geese, 
2 capons, price lod. The said customars shall give at the feast 
of St. Michael i qr. 6 bsh. of wheat, price 7^., forthcoming 
of chersete ; also at the feast of St. Martin for chersete 30 hens, 
price 2s 6d. The pleas and perquisites, with wards, reliefs, 
heriots, and sales of lands, are worth per annum bos. Also that 
the tallage of the bondmen per annum is worth los. The capi- 
tage of boys is worth per annum 45-. The pannage of pigs is 
worth per annum is. There is there a several pasture, and it is 
worth per annum 40J. There are there 2 foreign woods lying in 
common, containing 100 acres, of the which nothing can be sold 

7 6 f 



390 Wills hire 

because they lie in common. There is there one park containing 
200 acres, which is worth per annum as in pasture and sale of 
wood 405'. Sum, £ i^ ^s. zd. 

The works of the customars within the manor are worth per 
annum 72J. There are there in the demesne of arable land 
457 acres, which are worth per annum £% $s. Sd. ; also of meadow 
that may be mown 20 acres, which are worth per annum 60s. 
Sum, £i/\. i-js. Sd. 

The advowson of the church is in the gift of the lord of Coleren, 
and is worth per annum £^3 6^. Sd. The Abbot of Malmeshury 
holds of the lord of Coloren, viz., in Colerne, Tykwode, and 
Broughton, the fourth part of one knight's fee, and shall give for 
scutage when it shall happen ioj-. 

Richard Cronk and Robert de Lokenham hold in Colerne the eighth 
part of one knight's fee, and they shall give for scutage when it 
shall happen 5^. 

Sum of the value of the manor of Colerne, £n is. lod. Sum of 
the value of the advowson of the Church of Colerne, £$^ 6s. Sd. 
Sum of the fees, one quarter and the eighth part of one fee, and in 
money, 15^. 

Sterte. 

There is in the manor of Sterte one court with a garden and 
vineyards, which are worth per annum 8s. \d. ; also of rent of free- 
men and customars 48J. i\d., of the which there ought to be repaid 
to the Castle of Devizes for a certain [j/r] 20^., and so there 
remains, clear, 28^-. 2\d., and i lb. of cummin, price id., and 
55 geese which are worth 14s'. i\d. The said customars shall give 
of chersete 87 hens, which are worth 7^. 3^/. The pleas and 
perquisites with fines and heriots are worth per annum 13^. /\d. 
The several pasture there is worth per annum 60^. There is there 
one little grove which is worth per annum as in pasture and sale of 
underwood 3^. \d. The "Grastab" of the villeins is worth per 
annum 5^., and the tallage of the bondmen 6^. 8c/, 

The works of the customars within the manor are worth per 
annum loos, iid. There are there in the demesne of arable land 
246 acres, which are worth per annum £iS os. gd. ; also of meadow 
that may be mown 58J acres, which are worth per annum £1 1 14^. 

There is no advowson of the church or knight's fee belonging to 
the said manor. 

Sum of the value of the manor of Sterte, £^^.2 ys. 

Herdecote. 
There is at Herdecote one court with a curtilage and garden, and 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 391 

they are worth per annum 1 3 j. 4^. Also of rent of freemen and 
customars per annum 6oj. 5(/., and 2 lbs. of cummin, price zd. The 
pleas and perquisites are worth per annum 6j. M. There are there 
several pastures, and they are worth per annum 20J. Henry de 
Babestoke shall give yearly to have a certain chase bd. The fishing 
of the water is worth per annum 6^. The works of the customars 
of Herdecote are worth per annum is. \d. The said customars 
shall give at the feast of St. Martin 54 hens, and they are worth 
\s. 6d. 

There are in the demesne of arable land 200 acres, which are 
worth per annum £10 \ also of meadow that may be mown 
1 3 acres, which are worth per annum 39J. 

There is no advowson of the church or knight's fee belonging 
to the said manor. Sum, /'17 2>s. ^d. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 5 Edward 11^ No. 6g. 



Inquisition taken before the King's escheator i6th 
February, 6 Edward II [1312], by the oath oi John le Fiz 
Adam, Peter le Chaumberlayn, John de Netheravene, Geoffrey Kyng, 
Hugh le Boteler, John Fiz Williqm, John Prat, John de Commeldon, 
John de Canejord, John de Wynterburne, John de Edmeston, and 
William Atte Fenne, who say that 

Adam Slokke and Jeva his wife, on the day that the said Adam 
died, held the manor of Rusteshalle of the demise of Roger La 
Warre, to hold to the said Adam and Jeva and the heirs of the 
said Adam of the King in chief by the service of the fourth part of 
a knight's fee, and the said manor is worth per annum, clear, ;^2o. 

The said Adam and Jeva and Patrick their son, on the day that 
the said Adam died, held the manor of Stokke of the demise of 
Thomas de St. Vigore, to hold. to them and the heirs of the said 
Adam of the King in chief by the service of the eighth part of a 
knight's fee, and the said manor is worth per annum, clear, \oos. 
[Date of death not given.] 

Roger, son of the said Adam, is his next heir, and is aged 1 8 years 
and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward II, No. 27. 



392 Wiltshire 



(KHilliam TBaicman^ 

Inquisition taken at Graftone in co. Wilts before the 
King's escheator, 20th December, 6 Edward II [1312], by 
the oath of John Thoraud, Edward de Overton, William de Wike, 
Peter de Fostebury, John de Kepenhulle, Thomas Boueclive, Eustace de 
Crojtone, Richard Molend, Thomas Brut, John le Bodere, Richard 
Cocus, and Laurence Baxman, who say that 

William Baxman held of the King in chief on the day that he 
died in the vill of Graftone one messuage and one carucate of land 
by the service of 6^., to be paid to the castle of Sarum yearly 
in the feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary and by the 
service of finding one horse to carry 2 casks with the King's wine 
for the King when he shall come to the forests of Savernake and 
Chut to take venison, and the said William shall be at the charges 
of the lord the King as long as he shall dwell in the same service. 
The said messuage and land are worth per annum, clear, 15^. 
John de Holte, son of Avericia, daughter of the said William, is his 
next heir, and is aged 27 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward II, No. 31. 



Inquisition made at Nhorthyntone before the King's 
escheator, 15th July, 6 Edward II [1312], of the lands and 
tenements of the which yi?^^ de Berwyk died seised in his demesne 
as of fee in co. Wilts, by the oath of Peter Wippe, Robert Russel, 
John de Dernejord, John Cusyn, William Savage, Robert Gerand, 
Richard le Warde, Reginald Goudman, John Baard, Vyncent de 
Wodemanton, William Cole, and Richard Redleg, who say that 

John de Betwyk died seised in his demesne as of fee of the manor 
of Nhorthyntone. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, which is worth 
per annum 4J. There are there 12 free tenants who pay per 
annum 32^. bd. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions; also 12 half-virgators who pay per annum of rent and for 
works 42J. 4</. at the said 4 terms. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 393 

There are there 2 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 
3J., price of the acre \%d.\ also 140 acres of arable land,* which 
are worth per annum 35^., price of the acre 3^. There is there 
a certain wood containing 5 acres, which are worth 5^., price of 
the acre 1 id. There is there no several pasture. 

Roger, son of John Huse, is the next heir of the said John de 
Berwyk, and was aged 5 years at the feast of St. Peter which is 
called Ad Vincula last past. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 6 Edward 11, No. 43. 



aianu0 la %m<\^z. 

Inquisition made before the escheator of the lord the 
King in co. Wilts, 24th April, 7 Edward II [1314], by the 
oath of Thomas Ennok, William Goule, Richard le Heir, Ralph de la 
Berne, William Carpeler, John Hervy, Peter Roberd, William Clericus, 
Robert Gilberd, Robert Hethjeld, Robert a tie Halle, and Richard de 
Hile, who say that 

The Hundred of Rughebergh. 

Alanus la Zouch had no lands or tenements, knight's fees, or 
advowsons of churches in the said hundred on the day that he 
died, but he had formerly the moiety of one messuage, one carucate 
of land, and 71J. of yearly rent in Stupellavyntone, which he gave 
and granted to John la Zouch : to hold for the term of his life, so 
that after the death of the said John the said tenements should 
wholly remain to William Forsial: to hold to the said William and 
his heirs for ever, paying therefor yearly to the heirs of the said 
Alan after the death of the said John la Zouch 14 marks at 2 terms 
of the year, viz., at the feast of St. Michael one moiety and at the 
feast of Easter the other moiety. The said tenements are held 
of Henry de Waletone, by the service of the fourth part of one 
knight's fee. 

Ellen and Matilda, daughters of the said Alan, are his next 
heirs : the said Matilda, the younger daughter, is aged 24 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Edward II, No. 36. 



394 Wiltshire 



aianu)3 la Zmt\^z. 

~w • • • 

I nOUlSltlOn made before the escheator of the lord the 
JL King in the said county, 23rd December, 8 Edward II 
[13 14], of the knight's fees and advowsons of churches which 
were of Alan de la Sousche in the said county, by the oath of 
William Warde, John Kylewyne, John Sanser, Henry le Templer, John 
de Dupeford, John de Doene, Ralph de Aula, John Rykeman, John de 
Shrevelone, Ralph de Molendino, Thomas le Heyr, and William Elys, 
who say that 

Ingelram Berenger holds of the heirs of Alan la Sousche one 
messuage and 6 bovates of land in Aldredestone with the advowson 
of the church of the said vill by the service of the eighth part of 
one knight's fee, and they are worth per annum, clear, 10 marks. 

Joan Wake, formerly the wife of Hugh Wake, holds the manor of 
Wynterbornestoke of the heirs of the said Alan in free socage for 
the term of her life, and after her decease the said manor ought to 
remain to the heirs of the said Hugh, to hold of the heirs of the 
said Alan in the form aforesaid, and it is worth per annum, 
clear, ;^io. 

The Prior of Maydenehradele and the heirs of Fulk de Penbrig 
hold in Nothtodeworth 2 messuages and 2 carucates of land of the 
heirs of the said Alan by the service of half a knight's fee, and they 
are worth per annum, clear, ;;^io. 

Chan, Inq. p.m., 7 Edward II, No. 36. 



IRicljart)^ 0on of asicl^arD J^anja!^* 

InC|llISltlOn made before the escheator of the lord the 
King, 14th June, 8 Edward II [13 15], according to the form 
and tenour of the mandate sewn to this inquisition (to take into the 
King's hands all the lands and tenements of the said Richard), 
by the oath of Robert Plukenet, Roger Marmyon, Thomas North, 
Roger de Stoke, John de Brat tone, John Horkedale, Symon Renaud, 
John le Froe, James de Schoterstret, Roger de Uptone, Walter Wilecok, 
and Geoffrey le Kftyzt, who say that 

Richard, son of Richard Dansy, held in his demesne as of fee of 
the King in chief on the day that he died the manor of Dultone, 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 395 

by the service of half a knight's fee, and he pays therefor per 
annum 10 marks at the castle of Sarum in the feast of the 
Annunciation of the Blessed Mary. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, which are 
worth per annum los. ; also a certain water-mill, which is worth 
per annum half a mark, and a dovecote, which is worth per annum 
zs. There are there 230 acres of arable land, of the which 100 acres 
are worth per annum iooj., price of the acre 12^., and 130 acres 
are worth per annum 65^., price of the acre bd.\ also 6 acres of 
meadow, which are worth per annum gj., price of the acre \%d. 
There is there a several pasture, which is worth per annum 5^. 
There is there of rent of assize of free tenants 14J. \\d. at the 
feasts of St. Michael and Easter by equal portions. There are 
there 3 native cottars, who pay per annum 2j., viz., each of them 
8^. at the feast of Easter, and each of them shall work on each 
holy day, except Saturdays, from the feast of the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael, and one work 
is worth by the day \d. The pleas and perquisites are worth there 
by the year half a mark. Sum of the extent, £\z. 

Richard Dansjy, son of the said Richard, son of Richard Dansy, is 
his next heir, and is aged 28 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edivard II, No. 12. 



3iol)n tie (IB>r^mi0itet)e» 

The Hundred of Swanebergh and Alwardebury. 

InC^UlSltlOn made before the King's escheator in co. Wilts, 
z+th July. 8 Edward II [13 14], by the oath of Richard atte 
Chaumbre, Walter de Thacham, John Prat, John Bacheler, John de 
Gomeldone, Richard Piper, John Cole, Roger Tropenel, Peter Bartelot, 
John Davy, Robert Boluais, Robert Gilbert, and William Carpeter^ who 
say that 

John de Grymstede held nothing of the King in chief in his 
demesne as of fee in co. Wilts on the day that he died, but the 
said John died seised in his demesne as of fee of the manor of 
Grimstede, which is held of Reginald de Sancto Martino, by the 
service of half a knight's fee. 



396 Wiltshire 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, which are worth 
per annum 3^. There are there 3 free tenants, who pay per annum 
y. at 2 terms of the year, viz., at the feast of St. Michael one 
moiety and at the feast of Easter the other moiety. There are 
there 5 cottars, each of whom holds the third part of one virgate 
of land, who pay per annum 15J., viz., each of them 3J. at the said 
terms for 8 services ; also 5 other cottars, who pay per annum \os., 
viz., each of them is. at the said terms. There are there 140 acres 
of arable land, which are worth per annum zt,s. ^d., price of the 
acre 2d. ; also 6 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 9^., 
pricp of the acre i8d. There is there a certain several pasture, 
which is worth per annum ^s. ; also a certain dovecote, which is 
worth per annum [6j. Sd.]. Sum of the value of the whole of the said 
manor, 73J. 

The said /o/in de Grimstede died seised in his demesne as of fee 
of the manor of Shawe in the said county, which is held of Henry 
de Thisteldene by the service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, which are 
worth per annum zs. There is there a certain free tenant, who 
pays per annum one mark, viz., one moiety at the feast of 
St. Michael and the other moiety at the feast of Easter. There 
are there 3 half-virgators who pay per annum 15^., to wit, each 
of them jj. at the said terms for all service. There are there 
110 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum \%s. i^d.., 
price of the acre zd. ; also 3 acres of meaaow, which are worth per 
annum 4^., price of the acre xdd. Thqje is there a several pasture, 
which is worth per annum 5^. Sum of the value of the whole 
manor, 57^. M. 

The saidyi?^^ died seised in his demesne as of fee in the said 
county of \oos. of yearly rent forthcoming from 12 free tenants 
in Cherletone, and the said rent is held of Oliver de Ingham by the 
service of the fourth part of a knight's fee. 

John de Grymstede, son of the said John de Grymslede, is his next 
heir, and is aged 25 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward it, No. 24. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 397 

giol^n tie la iRr^ere. 

InC[lllSltlOn taken at Uppaven before the King's escheator 
in CO. Wilts, 24th December, 8 Edward II [1314], of the 
lands and tenements of the which John de Ripariis was seised in 
his demesne as of fee in the said county on the day that he died, 
by the oath of William de Byke, John de Kepenhull, John Hombre, 
John Hamelyn, William Boys, John Somers, John Borgolon, Thomas 
Waryn, Thomas Bon . . yne, Geoffrey Hoppegras, Peter Olyver, and 
John Fraunkeleyn, who say that 

John de Ripariis held in his demesne as of fee 2 parts of the 
manor of Wattone of the Earl of Gloucester by the service of half 
a knight's fee, and the said Earl of the King by the same service. 

There is there a capital messuage with a curtilage, which are 
worth per annum zs. There are there 1 18 acres of arable land, of 
the which 60 acres are worth per annum 15^., price of the acre 3^., 
and 58 acres are worth per annum 4^. \od., price of the acre id. 
There are there 6 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 
6^., price of the acre iid. There is there one croft of several 
pasture containing 20 acres, which is worth per annum is. ; also 
a certain other pasture which is called Toteryg, and is worth per 
annum is. There is there a certain free tenant who pays per 
annum <^s. at the feast of St. Michael for all service ; and another free 
tenant who pays per annum bd. at the same term. There are there 
7 virgators, 6 of whom pay per annum 10^. each, and the seventh 
virgator pays per annum 6s. for all service at the 4 principal terms 
of the year by equal portions, and they owe no works ; also 3 semi- 
virgators, who pay per annum, each one for himself, 5J. at the said 
terms by equal portions; also 4 cottars, each of whom pays per 
annum is. bd. at the said terms by equal portions ; also one small 
cottar, who pays per annum at the said terms iid. for all service. 
The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum 12^. 

The third part of the said manor is in the hands of Anahella, 
formerly the wife of Richard de Ripariis, who holds it in dower, and 
the reversion of the said third part of the said manor belongs to the 
heir of the said John de Ripariis. 

Sum of the value of the whole extent, £b \\s. \d. 

Thomas de Ripariis, son of the saidy^^w, is his next heir, and on 
the feast of St. Michael last past was aged 6 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward II, No. 27. 



39^ Wiltshire 

InCJUlSltlOn made before the King's escheator in co. 
Wilts, 20th April, 8 Edward II [1315], by the oath oi Peter 
Portebreif^ Adam Barbost, John de Auebury, Thomas Cusyn, Thomas 
Bernard, Stephen Pyris, Adam Bertelot, John le Smith, Alexander 
Giffard, Robert Simme, William Richard, and John de Bacham, who 
say that 

Henry le Moigne and Joan, his wife, held jointly on the day that 
the said Henry died one messuage, one carucate of land, and 20J. 
rent in Maidenewynterborne of the King in chief by the service of 
being larderer of the lord the King, if the King should wish to 
take him for that office. 

The said messuage is worth per annum 5^. ; 100 acres of arable 
land are worth per annum 25^., price of the acre id. ; 4 acres of 
meadow are worth per annum i8j. The several pasture there is 
worth per annum 30J. There are there certain tenants who pay 
per annum 20J. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions. 

The said Henry and Joan were jointly enfeoffed of the said lands 
and tenements by Master Thomas de Cobeham: to hold to them and 
the heirs of the said Henry, and they continued their joint seisin 
thereof up to the day of the death of the said Henry. 

The said Henry le Moigne held of the inheritance of Joan, his 
wife, on the day that he died the moiety of the manor of 
Bachamptone of John de Cobeham by the service of the fourth part 
of a knight's fee. 

The capital messuage there is worth yearly bs. Sd. There are 
there 100 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 50J., 
price of the acre 6d. ; also 2 acres of meadow, which are worth per 
annum 4J., price of the acre 2^. The several pasture there is 
worth per annum 13J. 4^. There is there of rent of a certain free 
tenant at the feast of Easter id. for all service. There are there 
certain natives who pay per annum 55^. 6d. at the 4 principal terms 
of the year by equal portions. There is there a certain dovecote, 
which is worth per annum 2s. The pleas and perquisites there are 
worth per annum 3^. 

John le Moigne, son of the said Henry and Joan, is their next 
heir, and is aged 16 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward II, No. 29. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 399 



9!o]^n tie ainonia. 

InCJUlSltlOn taken at Chippeham before John Jorge, sub- 
escheator of the lord the King in co. Wilts, on Saturday next 
after the feast of St. Leonard, 8 Edward II [13 14], by the oath of 
John de la Mare, John Caylewey, Adam Hardynge, Richard lue, John 
de Bourlegh, Walter WyUeame, John le Clerk, Imbert de Greyvyle, Alan 
Bruton, John le Chepman, William Pykeryng, and Nicholas Bolbe, who 
say that 

John de Vitionia did not hold any lands of the King in chief in 
CO. Wilts on the day that he died, but he held the manor of 
Westkyngton of Peler, son of Reginald and Cecilia ie Bella Campo, 
for the fourth part of one knight's fee. 

The capital messuage, with one small garden and curtilage, is 
worth per annum 2^-. One dovecote is worth per annum 2^. There 
are there 100 acres of arable land, and they are worth per annum 
25J., viz. each acre 3^.; also 12 acres of meadow, and they are 
worth \zs. ; also 20 acres of several pasture, and they are worth \os. 
The pasture in common is worth per annum \od. There are there 
24 acres of wood, the profit whereof is worth per annum 4^. 

Richard lue holds freely one hide of land in the said manor, and 
■ pays per annum \\s. ; William Pykeryng holds freely three virgates 
of land, and pays per annum \d. ; the said William holds one virgate 
of land for the term of his life and the life of Agnes his wife, 
and pays per annum one rose. John de Berwyk holds one hide 
of land, and pays per annum 12s. Cristina la Cocus holds one 
virgate of land freely, and pays per annum one rose. William de 
Mulecomb holds freely 2 virgates of land, and pays per annum bs. 
and one rose. Richard le Chepman holds freely 2 virgates of land, 
and pays per annum bs. Robert le Smyth and Elene his wife hold 
for the terms of their lives one virgate of, land, and pay per annum 
9 J. Peter luen, Edith luon, John atte Weye, William Artur, Robert le 
Bonk, John Arthur, Cristina de Schynvelle, John Dorey, John le 
Heyward and Alice his wife, Philip atte Wyke and Emma his wife 
hold freely for the term of their lives 5^ virgates of land, and pay 
per annum 57.^. o\d. Sum of the rent of;the free tenants, 104^. \d. 
and 3 roses. 

There are there 3 customars, each of whom holds 2 virgates 
of land, whose services and rents are worth per annum \%s. ; also 
II customars, each of whom holds one*" virgate of land, and the 
rents and services of the same are worth per annum us. 



400 Wiltshire 

Richard le Mu . . ward holds one virgate of land and one water- 
mill, and pays per annum 14^-. There are there 5 customars, each 
of whom holds half a virgate of land, and their rents and services 
are worth per annum ioj. There are there 5 cottars, who pay per 
annum los. The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum 5^. 

Sum of the whole extent, £12 izs. ^d. 

Peter, son of Reginald, and Cecilia de Belh Campo are the next 
heirs of the sdi\d John de Vifionia, and are aged 30 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward II, No. 43. 



iRcgmalu ne ^ancto fll^artino. 

InOUlSltlOn made before the King's escheator i5ih 
March, 8 Edward II [i3i4]> of '^^ lands and tenements 
which were of Reginald de Sanclo Martino in the said county, by 
the oath of Thomas de Gomeldone, Richard de Camera, Stephen 
Hulon, John le Frere, John Kytewyne, Philip le Cok, John le Porter, 
John le Parker, John de Bridefird, William Burdeyn, John Olyver, 
John Giltherd, and William le Savage, who say that 

Reginald de Sancto Martino held in his demesne as of fee on the 
day that he died, the moiety of the township of Istgrimstede of the 
King in chief as parcel of the moiety of the barony of Duene. 

There is there of rent of assize per annum forthcoming from 
certain free tenants at the 4 principal terms of the year 24^. ^d. by 
equal portions. There is there a certain grove, the profit whereof, 
as in herbage and underwood is worth per annum los. 

The said Reginald was"seised in his demesne as of fee of £it of 
yearly rent issuing out of the manor of Knyghteton at the 4 
principal terms of the year by equal portions : which said manor 
Master Richard de Clare holds for the term of his life of the heirs 
of the said Reginald on the demise of the said Reginald, and they 
of the Abbess of Wilton by the service of the fourth part of one 
knight's fee. 

The said Reginald held on the day that he died the manor of 
Duene of the King in chief by barony, which said manor he had 
of the gift and grant of Nicholas de St. Mauro : to hold to him and 
Eva, formerly his wife, and the heirs of their bodies ; so that if the 
said Reginald and Eva should die without heirs of their bodies, 
then the said manor should wholly remain to the right heirs of the 
said Reginald. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 401 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, which is 
worth per annum 2s. There are there 60 acres of arable land, 
which are worth per annum 15^., price of the acre ^d , and 3 acres 
of meadow which are worth per annum 3^., price of the acre \id. 
There is there a certain wood, and the profit thereof is worth per 
annum half a mark ; also 7 acres of several pasture, which are 
worth per annum 14^., price of the acre zd. There is there of 
rAit of free tenants at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions 30J. z\d. There are there 8 customars who pay per 
annum at the said terms 32J., viz. each of them 4^., and they 
ought to work as in mowing and carrying the meadow, and that 
work is worth 16^^., viz. the work of each one id. The pleas and 
perquisites there are worth per annum 3^. \d. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor, £\ \s. S^d. 

The said Reginald also held on the day that he died the manor 
of Ubetone of the Abbess of Wilton, by the service of the fourth 
part of a knight's fee : which said manor he had of the gift and 
grant of Nicholas de St. Maura : to hold to him and to Eva, 
formerly his wife, and to the heirs of their bodies, so that if the 
said Reginald and J^va shall die without heirs of their bodies, then 
the said manor shall wholly remain to the right heirs of the said 
Reginald. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, and they are 
worth per annum los.; one mill, which is worth per annum 4J. ; 
one water-mill, which is worth per annum 24s'. There are there 
424 acres of arable land, 204 acres whereof are worth per annum 
102s., price of the acre 6d., and 220 acres are worth per annum 
55^., price of the acre 3^. There are there 21 acres of meadow 
which are worth per annum 42^., price of the acre zs. The several 
pasture there is worth zs. ; and the pasture in common for sheep is 
worth per annum 5^. There are there 4 free tenants who pay per 
annum at the said terms by equal portions gs. ; also 6 virgators 
who pay per annum 30J. at the said terms, and' for their works from 
the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist until the feast of 
St. Michael Ss., viz. each of them i6d.; also 12 semi-virgators, 
who pay per annum 30^. at the said terms by equal portions, and 
for their works during the said time Ss., viz. each of them Sd.; 
also 5 cottars who pay per annum at the said terms js. bd. for all 
service. The pleas and perquisites there are worth per annum 15J. 
And each of the said customars shall give of chersete at the feast 
of St. Martin one cock and 2 hens. Sum, /^ly i is. bd. 

The said Reginald held on the day that he died the manor of 
Werdore of the Abbess of Wilton by the service of the fourth part 

WILTS INQ,— VOL. 11. 26 

2 7 



402 Wiltshire 

of one knight's fee, which said manor he had of the gift and grant 
of Nicholas de Si. Maiiro : to hold to him and to Eva, formerly his 
wife, and to the heirs of their bodies ; so that if they shall die 
without such heirs, then the said mq,nor shall fully remain to the 
right heirs of the said Reginald. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, which 
are worth per annum \os. ; also a dovecote, which is worth per 
annum ■*,$. \d. There are there 140 acres of arable land, 80 acres 
whereof are worth per annum 26J. 8</., price of the acre 4</., and 
60 acres are worth per annum i^s., price of the acre id. There 
are there 8 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum i6j., 
price of the acre is. ; also 24 acres of several pasture, which are 
worth per annum 5^., price of the acre z\d. There is there 
a certain small grove, which is worth per annum as in underwood 
and pasture half a mark. There are there 3 semi-virgators who 
pay per annum 6i'., viz. each of them 25-., and they ought to work 
on each working day in the year, and the work of each is worth by 
the day \d. The pleas and perquisites are worth there per annum 
y. \d. Sum, £ \ %s. %d. 

Lawrence de St. Martina, son of the said Reginald and Eva, is 
their next heir, and is aged 23 years and more. 

Clian. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward II, No. 58. 



BcginalD De ^ancto S©arttno. 

InC[UlSltlOn made before the King's escheator at Westdune, 
12th March, 8 Edward II [1314], by the oath of Henry de 
Cerne, Richard Dun, John de Shir/ord, Hugh atte Mere, Hugh Samon, 
William Bisshop, John Bernyr, John atte Forde, John Rumbold, John 
Bedd, Robert le Fbnge, and John le Frere, who say that 

Reginald de St. Martino held on the day that he died certain 
tenements in Duene of the King in chief as parcel of the barony, 
and they are worth per annum, clear, i6s. 

Lawrence de St. Martino is the son and next heir of the said 
Reginald, and is aged 23 years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward II, No. 58. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 403 

ctE^ilbert De Clare^ Carl of c^louce^ter anD 

8)ettfotD* 

InQlllSltlOn taken before the escheator of the lord the 
King at Wexcombe, i8th September, 8 Edward II [13 14], of 
the lands and tenements which were of Gilbert de Clare, formerly 
Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, by the oath of William de Stockes, 
Peter Olyver, John Fratinkeleyn, Geoffrey Hoppegras, William Hamond, 
Geoffrey le Sauvage, John Somerset e, William Bothel, Adam Beggere, 
fohn Cartere, William Hykedon, and Adam Cornmanger, who say that 

Wexcombe and Hundred of Kynewardeston. 

The said Earl held in his demesne as of fee in co. Wilts on the 
day that he died the manor of Wexcombe with the hundred of 
Kynewardeston at fee farm of the King in chief, belonging to the 
earldom of Gloucester, paying therefor per annum at the King's 
Exchequer /"30. In which said manor there is a certain capital 
messuage with a garden, curtilage, and barton, which are 
worth per annum 6s. Sd. There are there 128 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum 64^'., price of the acre 6d. ; 
also 200 acres of land, which are worth per annum 66s. Sd., 
price of the acre ^d. ; also 150 acres of land, which are worth 
per annum 37J. 6d., price of the acre ^d. ; also 20 acres of 
meadow, which are worth per annum 4.0s., price of the acre zs. ; 
also 14 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum igs. 6d., 
price of the acre i8d.; also 200 acres of pasture, which are 
worth per annum 33^. ^d., price of the acre zd. ; also 168 acres 
of pasture, which are worth 14J., price of the acre id. There is 
there a certain grove which contains 4 acres, which are worth per 
annum, as well in wood as in pasture, 3^., price of the acre gd. ; 
also a wood, the underwood whereof is worth per annum 2s. id. 
The pasture there is not extended because it is in common. There 
are there 8 free tenants who pay per annum at the 4 principal 
terms of the year by equal portions 45 j. lod. And one free tenant 
who pays per annum at the feast of St. Michael 20s., and one who 
pays at 2 terms of the year, viz. at the feast of the Annunciation of 
the Blessed Mary and St. Michael, by equal portions 42J. ; and one 
who pays per annum at the feast of St. Michael 6s. 8d. ; and one 
who pays per annum at the same term ilb. of cummin, and it is 
worth a halfpenny. There are there 23 customars, each of whom 
holds one virgate of land in villeinage and pays per annum at the 



404 Wiltshire 

4 principal terms by equal portions 55. : sum, 115J. Also 5 
customars, each of whom holds half a virgate of land in villeinage 
and pays per annum at the said 4. terms by equal portions 2J. bd. : 
sum, 1 2 J. bd. And each of the said customars pays for his works 
from the feast of St. Michael up to the feast of the Nativity of 
St. John the Baptist, viz., at the feast of the Nativity of the Lord, 
Easter, and the said feast of St. John, by equal portions bd. And 
each of the said 16 customars pays for his works besides for the 
said time at the said 3 terms by equal portions 15^. And each of 
them pays for his works from the feast of the Nativity of St. John 
the Baptist up to the gule of August z\d., and each of them shall 
work every day from the gule of August up to the feast of St. Michael, 
except Saturdays, Sundays, and feast days, and the work of each 
is worth for the said time jj. ']\d., viz. by the day \\d. There 
are there 4 free cottars who pay per annum at 4 terms by equal 
portions its. Also -8 customary cottars, each of whom pays 
per annum at the said 4 principal terms by equal portions zod. 
And they ought to work, and the work of each is worth from the 
feast of St. Michael up to the feast of the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist \\d., and from the feast of St. John the Baptist up to the 
gule of August 7</., and from the gule of August up to the feast 
of St. Michael iid. 

There is there the foreign hundred of Kynewardeston, the pleas 
and perquisites whereof with cert money are worth per annum £ \b. 
The pleas and perquisites of the intrinsic court are worth per 
annum 30.?. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor with the said -hundred 
^55 7^. t\d., whereof for farm to be paid to the Exchequer £10. 
And so the sum is clear £z% -js. b\d. 

BURGHBACH. 

The said Gilbert the Earl held in his demesne as of fee in the 
said county on the day that he died the manor of Burghbach 
Sauvage of the Earl Marshal, by what service the jurors know not. 
There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden and barton, 
which are worth per annum ^. There are there 100 acres of 
arable land which are worth per annum ^s. \d., price of the acre 
4^/. ; also 69 acres of land which are worth per annum lyj. 3^/., 
price of the acre 3^.; also 10 acres of meadow which are worth 
per annum zos., price of the acre zs. ; also iio acres of pasture 
which are worth per annum 27^. bd., price of the acre 3^. There is 
there a certain grove which contains 10 acres, and is worth in the 
whole by the year los. There are there 6 free tenants who pay 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 405 

per annum at 3 terms, viz., at the feast of the Nativity of the Lord, 
Pentecost, and St. Michael, by equal portions, 25J. t^d. And one 
free tenant who pays per annum at the 4 principal terms by equal 
portions 13^'. 4</. And 7 free tenants who pay per annum at the 
feast of St. Michael in the whole 4^. 9^. And one free tenant who 
pays per annum at the same term i lb. of pepper, price \zd. And 
2 tenants who pay per annum at the same term 2 lbs. of cummiu) 
prtce zd. And one free tenant who pays per annum at the Nativity 
I lb. of wax, price td. There are there 9 customars each of whom 
holds half a virgate of land in villeinage, and pays per annum at the 
said 3 terms by equal portions 6j. ; and for a certain custom which 
is called cherset at the feast of St. Martin dd. ; and at Easter 10 
eggs price \d. There are there 17 customary cottars who pay per 
annum at the said 3 terms by equal portions 47J. 6</., and pay for 
custom at the feast of St. Martin in the whole 3^. b\d., and at 
Easter in the whole \d. The pleas and perquisites of the court 
there are worth per annum ds. 8d. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor, £1^ i^s. "jd. 

Bedewynde. 

The said Gilbert the Earl held in his demesne as of fee in the 
county aforesaid on the day that he died the borough of Bedewynde 
of the King in chief belonging to the earldom of Gloucester, in the 
which there are burgesses who pay per annum at the 4 principal 
terms by equal portions 46^, 9^/. The toll of the market there is 
worth per annum 10^. The pleas and perquisites of the court 
there are worth per annum 20s. Sum of the value of the whole 
borough, 765'. 9^. 

The said Earl also died seised in his demesne as of fee in the 
said county on the day that he died of the free tenants under- 
written belonging to the Earldom of Gloucester, as follows. There 
is at La Hyde next Dornerham one free tenant who pays per 
annum at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions 
33^. 4^/. ; also one free tenant at Loppeshale who pays per annum 
at the said terms bs. Sd. The pleas and perquisites of a certain 
view of frank-pledge at Cnouke twice in the year are worth with 
. . . 6s. Sd. ; and the pleas and perquisites of another view 
of frank-pledge of Smalebrok twice in the year are worth per 
annum iid. . . . 

Gilbert de Clare, formerly Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, father 
of Gilbert the Earl, who has now died, granted to Peter de . . ^ 
the manors of Cnouk and Ordrytheston for the term of his life ; 
after whose death the said manors ought to revert wholly to the 
2 7 * 



4o6 Wiltshire 

heirs ... of the said Earl who has now died, and the said 
manors are worth, clear, according to their true value, per 
annum £1^- 

Sum of the value of the said 2 tenants and views, 47^. %d. 

Alianora, Margaret, and Elizabeth, sisters of the said Earl, are his 
next heirs, and are of full age. Whether the Countess is pregnant 
or not the jurors do not know. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 8 Edward 11, No. 68. 



2BUUam 0on of ^tttx tie iliUebon* 

Writ. 

Edward, by the grace of God, etc., to Master yb^w Waleweyn, his 
escheator on this side the Trent. 

Because William, son oi Peter de Lillehon, a lunatic, whose lands 
and tenements by reason of his idiotcy are in our hands, has died, 
as we are told, we command you diligently to enquire what lands 
and tenements came to our hands by reason of his idiotcy, etc. 

Witness ourself at Westminster 19th April, in the 9th year of our 
reign [1315]. 

InCJUlSltlOn made before the King's escheator, loth June, 
9 Edward II [1315], by the oath o{ Edivard de Overtone, John 
Kepehalle, John Turald, John Purler, Peter Oliver, John Chamberlain, 
Peter Fostebury, John Frautikelein, Richard Gervais, Alexander Biixere, 
John Somersete, and Thomas Boueclive, who say that 

One messuage and one virgate of land and a half in Burbach are 
in the King's hand by reason of the lunacy of William de Lillebon, 
which said messuage and land are in the custody of Nicholas de 
Kingestone, of the demise of the lord the King to hold at his 
pleasure, and are held of the inheritance of the Earl of Gloucester 
being in the King's hand, by the service of bs. to be paid yearly 
to the said Earl for all services, and are worth per annum, 
clear, 6s. Sd. 

William de Lillebon, knight, kinsman of the said William de 
Lillebon, lunatic, is his next heir, and is aged 40 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward II, No. 23. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 407 



iaobett 0orT of J^auan. 

IriQlllSlLlOn taken before the King's escheator, 2nd 
October, 9 Edward II [1315], by the oath of Walter de Baa, 
Richard Umfrai, John le Frenshe, Richard le Engleis, Robert Jenkin, 
William Nouel, John Turketil, Hugh Suche, Guy de Stourtone, William 
Ingram, Reginald Artur, and Robert atte Shawe, who say that 

Robert son oi Pagan held on the day that he died the manor of 
Pole of the Earl o( Lancaster hy the service of half a knight's fee : 
in which said manor there is a capital messuage with a garden, 
which are worth per annum 5^. There are there 85 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum 28^. ^d., price of the acre ^d. ; 
also 7 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 7^., price of 
the acre iid. There is there a several pasture, which is worth per 
annum 5^.; also a certain grove containing 10 acres, the profit 
whereof as in herbage and underwood is worth per annum 5^. 
There are there 2 free tenants who pay per annum 20^. at the 4 
principal terms of the year by equal portions for all services ; also 
1 1 natives, each of whom holds one virgate of land, and they pay 
per annum 55^. at the 4 principal terms of the year; also 5 natives, 
each of whom holds half a virgate of land, and they pay per annum 
\2s. 6d., viz. each of them 2^. bd. at the said terms. And all the 
said natives give of cert money for a certain custom at the feast of 
St. Michael 6s. 8d. The pleas and perquisites there are worth per 
annum iid. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor aforesaid, /^j 5^. 6d. 

The said Robert, son of Pagan and Isabella, his wife, held jointly 
on the day of the death of the said Robert the manor of Stourtone 
of Richard Lovel by the service of one knight's fee : in which 
said manor there is a certain capital messuage with a garden, 
which are worth per annum ^s. There are there 100 acres of 
arable land, which are worth per annum 25^., price of the acre id. ; 
also 3 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 3^., price of 
the acre \zd. There is there a several pasture, which is worth per 
annum half a mark. There are there 5 free tenants who pay per 
annum %s. bd. at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal 
portions ; also 3 natives, each of whom holds half a virgate of 
land, and pays per annum 12^., viz. each of them 4^. at the said 
terms ; also 7 cottars, each of whom holds one cottage, and they 
pay per annum 14^., viz. each of them zs. at the said terms. 



4o8 Wiltshire 

There is there a certain water-mill, which is worth per annum 
13J. \d. The pleas and perquisites there are worth per annum y. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor aforesaid, £if %s. 6d. 

Robert son of Pagan, son of the said Robert, is his next heir, and 
is aged 28 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., g Edward II, No. 63. 



CDt»arti 'BurneL 

Extent made before the King's escheator at Warministre, 
2 1 St January, 10 Edward II [13 16], upon the true value of 
the knight's fees and advowsons of Churches which were o{ Edward 
Burnel, lately deceased, in co. Wilts, on the day that he died, and 
which by reason of his death are taken into the King's hand, 
by the oath of Robert le Boor, John de Tynhude, William atte Halle, 
of Bradeford, William de Gatecoumbe, John de Birton, John Manger, 
John Bernard, Geoffrey Maudut, John Dalewaye, John le Chipenham, 
Thomas Teny, and John de Bradejord, who say that 

The said Edward Burnel had on the day that he died in the said 
county the advowson of the Church of Fennysutton, and it is worth 
per annum, according to its true value, ^30. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edivard II, No. 67, 



(m^t De i3ello Campo, late Carl of martoicft* 

InCjUlSltlOn taken at Calne before the King's escheator 
on the loth day of December, 9 Edward II [1315], by the 
oath of Walter de Compton, Thomas Weylond, Robert de Wychamion, 
Walter le Chamberleyn, Richard Weylond, Richard Reymond, William 
Edmond, William de Chelaviste, William Aste, Adam Sheter, Richard 
Sheter, and William de Tazeworth, who say that 

Guy de Bello Campo, late Earl of Watwick, held in his demesne 
as of fee on the day that he died the manor of Chyryel of the King 
in chief by the service of one knight's fee : in which said manor 
there is a certain capital messuage with a garden and dovecote, 
which are worth per annum half a mark. There are there 160 
acres of arable land, whereof 100 acres are worth 50J., price of the 
acre 6c/., and 60 acres are worth' per annum 15J., price of the acre 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 4^9 

id. ; also 15 acres of meadow that may be mown, which are worth 
per annum 30J., price of the acre ^s. There is there a several 
pasture, which is worth per annum 13J. \d. There are there 30 
acres of wood within the King's forest of Pewesham, the profit 
whereof is worth per annum ^s., and not more because it is in the 
forest. There are there 2 free tenants who pay per annum 2 lbs. of 
cummin at the feast of St. Michael, and they are worth zd. ; also 
15 natives, each of whom holds one virgate of land, and they pay 
per annum / 8, viz. each of them icr., except one of them who 
pays 20S., at the 4 principal terms of the year, by equal portions for 
all services; also 6 natives, each of whom holds half a virgate of 
land, and they pay per annum 30^'., viz. each of them 5^. at the 
said terms. There is there a certain native who holds half a virgate 
of land and pays per annum \is. at the said terms; and a certain 
other native who holds half a virgate of land who shall make the 
ironwork of 2 ploughs at his own proper costs, and that work is 
worth by the year 5^-. There are there 12 cottars, each of whom 
holds the third part of one virgate of land, and they pay per annum 
36.?., viz. each of them 3^. at the said terms for all services. The 
pleas and perquisites are worth per annum 6^-. %d. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor aforesaid, £1% 95. 10^. 

Thomas de Bello Campo, son of the said Guy de Bello Campo, is his 
next heir, and is aged one year and a half and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., g Edward I J, N'o. 71. 



(0ut tie 'Bello Campo, late Carl of 2HartD(cfi» 

Inquisition taken at New Sarum before the King's 
escheator, 8th September, g Edward II [1315], by the oath 
of John de Kynggesmulle, Richard le Rede, John le Flynt, Henry le 
Frye, John Martyn, John Molend, Robert de Donylone, John Silk, 
Philip the Clerk, William de Stauntone, Henry Trussehare, and 
Thomas de Aune, who say that 

Stratford Tony. 
Guy de Bello Campo, late Earl of Warwick, held on the day that 
he died the manor of Stratford Tony of the inheritance of Alice his 
wife, of the Earl of Leicester, by the service of half a knight's fee. 
There is there a certain capital messuage with a curtilage and 
garden, which are worth per annum 2^'., besides reprises. There 
are there of arable land 200 acres of land, 100 acres whereof are 



4IO Wiltshire 

worth 255'., price of the acre id., and 100 acres are worth per 
annum 8j. \d., price of the acre \d. ; also 10 acres of meadow that 
may be mown, which are worth per annum 15J., price of the acre 
\%d. There is there a several pasture, which is worth per annum 
5^, There are there 2 free tenants who pay per annum at 3 terms, 
viz., at the feast of the Purification of the Blessed Mary the Virgin, 
the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and at the feast of 
St. Michael, 38^. by equal portions; also 24 customars, each of 
whom holds half a virgate of land, and they pay per annum 
£\ loj., viz. each of them 3^. c^d. at the said terms. And they 
ought to work from the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula every year 
until the feast of St. Michael on Saturday, all holy days excepted, 
and their works are worth yearly during the said time 6oj., viz. the 
work of each 2^. bd. There is there of a certain custom of the 
said customars at the feast of St. Michael 20J. of tallage. There 
are there 1 1 cottars who hold at will, and they pay per annum 
%s. -jd. at the said terms by equal portions. The pleas and 
perquisites of the Court there are worth per annum Si". 

Sum of the whole value of the manor, clear, £11 iqj. \\d. 

Thomas de Bello Campo, son of the said Guy, is his next heir, and 
is aged one year and a half and more. 

Nywetone Tony. 

The said Guy de Bello Campo held on the day that he died the 
manor of Nywetone Tony of the inheritance of Alice his wife, of the 
Earl of Hertford, by the service of one knight's fee. There is there 
a certain capital messuage with a curtilage, which are worth per 
annum 3J. There are there 200 acres of arable land, whereof 100 
are worth per annum 25^., price of the acre ^d., and 120 are worth 
per annum loj., price of the acre \d. ; also 8 acres of meadow, 
which are worth per annum 8^., price of the acre izd. There is 
there a several pasture, which is worth per annum 4^. There are 
there 2 free tenants who pay per annum 54^. at the terms above- 
said by equal portions ; also 14 customars, each of whom holds one 
virgate of land, and they pay per annum £\ \s., viz. each of them 
per annum bs. at the said terms. And they ought to work from the 
feast of St. Peter which is called Ad Vincula until the feast of 
St. Michael every Saturday, all feast days excepted, whose works 
are worth yearly for the said time 42^-., viz. the work of each one 
3^. There are there 6 customars, each of whom holds half a virgate 
of land, and they pay per annum \%s., viz. each of them 3^. ; and 
they ought to work for the whole time Tike the said customars, and 
their works are worth \ts., viz. the work of each of them for the 



Ifiquisitiones Post Mortem. 411 

said time 2j. All the said customars give and ought to give yearly 
of a certain custom at the feast of St. Michael 36^. of tallage. The 
pleas and perquisites of the Court there are worth per annum 2x. 

Sum of the value of the whole manor, clear, £if. \%s. 

Thomas de)Bello Campo, son of the said Guy, is his next heir, and 
is aged i^ years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 9 Edward II, No. 71. 



(0u^ De iBello Campo^ late Carl of 2Ilaria)ic6. 

InOUlSltlOn made before the King's escheator, 20^.1 
September, 9 Edward II [13 15], of the knight's fees and 
advowsons of churches which were of Guy de Bello Campo in the 
said county, by the oath of William Acer, Gilbert Finamor, Robert 
Poukes, William Depegat, Roger Monek, Walter Dauwe, Adam le 
Shetere, Richard le Shetere, William Tazeworth, Richard Reimond, 
Walter atte Wode, and Robert de Holedene, who say that 

Richard, son of Adam de la Ryvere, holds in Wodebergh half 
a knight's fee of the inheritance of the said Guy de Bello Campo, 
late Earl of Warwick, and it is worth per annum, clear, 10 marks 
John de Clingtone of Makestoke holds in Lidiard one knight's fee 
of the heirs of the said Guy, and it is worth per annum, clear, £to. 
John Torni and Isabella his wife hold in Tidecombe the eighth part 
of one knight's fee, and it is worth per annum, clear, 40J. 

The advowson of the Church of Wodebergh belongs to the heirs 
of the said Guy de Bello Campo after the decease of Emma, who 
was the wife o{ Richard son o^ John, who holds the same in dower 
by the death of the said Richard formerly her husband, and it is 
worth per annum £10. 

Chan. Inq.p.m., 9 Edward II, No. 71. 



Cl^e abbot of ^t» dD^eorge De 'Bajsftertille. 

Edward, by the grace of God, etc., io John Walewayn, his escheator 
on this side the Trent. 

We wishing to be certified as to the reason for taking the lands 
and tenements which were of the Abbot of St. George de Baskervill 
of Normandy in Wynterburne Daundeseye into our hands by you 
as it is said : We command you that you certify us without delay 



4 1 2 Wiltshire 

as to the said reason and true value of the said lands and tenements, 
returning to us this writ. 

Witness ourself at Westminster 13th May, in the 9th year of 
our reign. 



John Abel, late the escheator of the lord the King on this side 
the Trent, has certified me that he finds by inquisition made by 
virtue of his office that the Abbot of St. George de Baskervill in 
Normandy has a certain priory called Avesbury in co. Wilts, to 
which said priory there belong the manor of Avesbury and divers 
other lands, which are worth per annum about £io, and are held of 
the King in chief: which said abbey has been many times vacant, 
and the lord at the times of the vacancies did not have the custody 
thereof, on account of which I took those tenements into the hand 
of the King in the name of distress without taking anything thereof 
until anything else shall be entrusted to me therein. 

Writs and Returns, Chan., Wilts, 9 Edward II, No. 74. 



InC^mSlLlOn taken before the King's escheator at Cheles- 
worth in co. Wilts on Saturday next after the feast of the 
Purification of the Blessed Mary, 10 Edward II [i3i6],by the oath 
of Hugh Chanon, Robert Maureward,, Richard Costard, Adam le 
Frenshe, Andrew le Clerk, William Colenham, Thomas atte Temple, 
John le Frie, Richard le Monek, John de Hobeschort, Nicholas Ingram, 
Nicholas David, Richard atte Hulle, Thomas atte Mulle, Nicholas 
Mtysy, and William alte Brugge, who say that 

Nicholas de Sancto Mauro held on the day that he died, viz. on 
Saturday next after the Commemoration of All Saints last past, 
the manor of Poltone next Creckelade, with the advowson of the 
Church of the King in chief by the service of one knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, and it is worth 
per annum ^s. There is there of rent of assize of free tenants and 
customars £ \o per annum at the 4 principal terms. The pleas 
and perquisites are worth per annum \os. There are there 
150 acres of arable land, 100 acres whereof may be sown by the 
year, and they are worth per annum 20^., price of the acre zd. ; 
also 6 acres of meadow, price of the acre \%d. per annum. The 
pasture there is worth per annum zs. And the church is worth 
per annum 20 marks according to its true value. 



Inqnisitiones Post Mortem. 413 

He also held the manor of Etone Meysy on the day that he died 
of the Earl of Gloucester in chief by the service of 8 knights' fees, as 
well for the said manor of Etone as for other manors in divers 
counties, by what services the jurors know not. 

There is there a capital messuage without a garden or close, and 
the easements are worth bd. per annum. There is there of the 
rent of free tenants per annum \os. at the said terms. There are 
there 10 customars who pay nothing per annum except works 
which are worth per annum zos. There are there 150 acres of 
arable land, whereof 100 acres may be sown per annum, and they 
are worth per annum 20J., price of the acre rd. Also 2 water-mills, 
and they are worth per annum 20J.. Also 20 acres of meadow, and 
they are worth per annum 20^., price of the acre \zd. There is 
a several fishery there, and it is worth per annum zs. 

The said manors of Polton and Etone Meysi are capital manors, 
and not members of any other manors, hundreds, or liberties 
formerly as aforesaid held, nevertheless the manor of Polton is 
within the limits of the hundred of Crecklade, and the manor of 
Etone Meysy is within the hundred of Hauteworth. 

The pleas and perquisites of the manor of Eton are worth 
per annum half a mark. The Church of Eton Meysy is worth 
per annum 40 marks : the said Nicholas died seised of the advowson 
there as of the said manor of Eton. 

Thomas de Sancto Mauro is the eldest son and next heir of the 
said Nicholas, and is aged 12 years and 3 months. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edivard II, No. 59. 



InCJUlSltlOtl taken before the King's escheator at Knyghton 
Paynel on Monday in the feast of St. Mark the Evangelist, 
10 Edward II [13 16], by the oath of Thomas Enoh, William Goule, 
William Morys, William de Aula, Simon Gereberd, Walter Albert, 
John le Frye, William Beyschyn, Henry Trussehare, Henry le Blake, 
Richard de Mildestone, and Geoffrey Irneys, who say that 

William Paynd held in his demesne as of fee on the day that he 
died the manor of Lutleton Paynel of the King in chief by the 
service of one knight's fee, which service is assigned to the ward- 
ship of the castle of Devises for 40 days at his own costs as often 
as there shall be war in those parts, and in the time of peace he 
shall pay per annum zos. to the constable of the said castle for the 
time being for all service. 



4 1 4 Wiltshire 

There is there a capital messuage without a garden, and it is 
worth per annum izd. The dovecote is worth per annum zos. 
There is of rent of assize there per annum £() 15J. td. at the terms 
of St. Michael, St. Thomas the Apostle, the Annunciation of Our 
Lady, and St. John the Baptist, by equal portions. The pleas and 
perquisites are worth per annum zos. There are there 200 acres 
of arable land, whereof there may be sown with wheat per annum 
35 acres, and the acre is worth 8^. ; with fine wheat 10 acres, and 
the acre is worth bd. ; with barley 1 2 acres, and the acre is worth 
bd. ; and with oats 30 acres, and the acre is worth 4^. There are 
there i z acres of meadow, and the acre is worth per annum 1 8</. 
The common pasture for large beasts is worth per annum loj. 
The pasture for zoo sheep is worth per annum ibs. There are 
there 3 acres of wood, and the underwood is worth per annum iid. 

The said William Paynel also held the manor of Knyhttone 
Paynel in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died oi Henry 
Heosee of Hertynges, by the service of paying per annum one 
sparhawk or 2^. at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 
for all service. There is there a capital messuage with a garden, 
and it is worth per annum zs. The dovecote is worth per annum 
\zd. The water-mill is worth per annum zos. There is there of 
rent of assize \\s. id. to be paid per annum at the said terms. 
The pleas and perquisites are worth per annum zs. There are 
there 216 acres of arable land, whereof there may be sown per 
annum with wheat 30 acres, and the acre is worth bd. ; with barley 
40 acres per annum, and the acre is worth 8(/. ; with oats 20 acres, 
and the acre is worth per annum ^d. ; and with peas and vetch 
12 acres, and the acre is worth ^d. There are there 5 acres of 
meadow, and the acre is worth per annum zs. The common 
pasture for large beasts is worth 40^/. The pasture for 350 sheep is 
worth per annum zqs. zd., per head \d. 

William Paynel died ist April in the said year; John Paynel \s 
his brother and next heir, and is aged 50 years and more. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edward II, A^. 61. 



Cljeobain tie aertion. 



Inquisition taken before the King's escheator at Stoke 
Verdon, loth October, 10 Edward II [13 16], of the lands 
and tenements which were of Theobald de Verdon in the said county 
on the day that he died, by the oath of William de Wodemanton, 



hiqiiisitiones Post Mortem. 415 

John de Derne/ord, Robert Russell, John Cusin, Walter Aundreu, 
Richard Wake, Reginald Godeman, John Cuty, Richard Redleg, 
Vincent de Wodemanton, Thomas de Gerardeston, and Richard le Warde, 
who say that 

Stoke Verdon. 
Theobald de Verdon held on the day that he died in his demesne 
as of fee the manor of Stoke Verdon of the Abbess of Wilton at 
fee-farm, paying therefor yearly to the said Abbess and her 
successors/' 1 1 of silver at 2 terms of the year, viz., one moiety 
every year in the feast of St. Edith the Virgin in autumn, and 
the other moiety every year on Monday on the morrow of IVIid- 
Lent for all services. 

There is there a capital messuage with a small barton, which are 
worth per annum 35. ^d. There are there ioo acres of arable land, 
60 acres whereof are worth per annum 30J., price of the acre 6d. ; 
and 40 acres are worth per annum los., price of the acre 3^.; 
also 2 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 3^., price of 
the acre 18^/.; also 10 acres of several pasture, which are worth 
per annum is. 6d., price of the acre sd. There is there a pasture 
in common which is worth per annum 2s. There is there of rent 
of 4 freemen 70^., to be taken at the 4 principal terms of the 
year, viz., at the feasts of the Nativity of the Lord, Easter, St. John 
the Baptist, and St. Michael, by equal portions, for all services, 
saving suit at the court of the said manor twice in the year. There 
are there 4 virgators holding in villeinage, who pay per annum /■4, 
viz., each of them 20J. at the said terms by equal portions for all 
services saving suit at the court of the said manor when they shall 
be summoned. There are there 10 semi-virgators holding in 
villeinage, who pay per annum loos., viz., each of them 10s. at^'the 
said terms by equal portions for all services saving suit at the said 
court when they shall be summoned. The pleas and perquisites 
there are worth per annum 3J. ^d. 

Sum of the value of the said manor, /is 4^. 2d., whereof in rent 
resolute to the Abbess £1 1, and so it is worth, clear, ;^4 4^. 2d. 

Wyvelesford. 

The said Theobald also held on the day that he died in his 
demesne as of fee in the said county i messuage and 4 bovaes 
in Wyvelesford of the Bishop of Salisbury, paying therefor ye:, rly 
to the said Bishop and his successors -f^. i^s. ^d. in the feast of 
Holy Trinity for all services. 

There is there a capital messuage with a small garden, which are 
worth per annum 4^. There are there 60 acres of arable land, 



41 6 Wiltshire 

which are worth per annum 20s., price of the acre 4</. Also 3 acres 
of meadow, which are worth per annum 4^., price of the acre i^d. 
There is there a common pasture, which is worth per annum $s. 
There is there a certain free tenant who pays per annum igx. ^\d. 
in the vigil of Holy Trinity for all services ; and 3 other free 
tenants who pay per annum at the same term 405-., viz. each of 
them 13J. \d. 

There are there 6 cottars, each of whom holds one messuage and 
the third part of one virgate of land in villeinage, who pay per 
annum at the said terms 40J., viz., each of them bs. 8d. The pleas 
and perquisites there are worth per annum izd. 

Sum of the value of the lands of Wyvelesford, £6. i^s. ^^d., 
whereof in rent resolute to the Bishop of Sarurti £^ i t,s. ^., and 
so it is worth, clear, 395'. w^d. . 

Joan, Elizabeth, and Margery, daughters of the said Theobald, are 
his next heirs. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 10 Edward II, No. 71. 



InOUlSltlOn taken at Sarum before the King's escheator 
on Wednesday next after the feast of St, Nicholas, 
II Edward II [13 17], by the oath of William atle Dene, Richard 
Trenchefoil, Robert Baldet, Robert de Bury, Nicholas Phelipe, John 
le Ster, Roger de Haredene, William de Stocke, William de Wike, 
John Chanyn, Philip de Uptone, and Richard Gerveys, who say that 

Richard de Polhampton held on the day that he died the moiety 
of the manor of Croftone for the term of the life of the said 
Richard and of Alargaret his wife, of the grant of Alan, son of 
Waren, doing therefor per annum for the said Alan, the chief lord 
of the fee, the services therefor due and accustomed : it is held of 
William Kayngttel, of lattone Kayngnel, by the service of the 
moiety of one knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden, and it is worth 
per annum iid. There are there 150 acres of land, the approve- 
ment whereof is worth per annum \bs. M. Also 4 acres of meadow 
worth per annum bs. Also 6 acres of wood, and the underwood is 
worth per annum \id. Of rent of assize there is 40J. per annum 
at the 4 principal terms. The services of the customars are worth 
per annum 2s. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 417 

The said Richard de Polhampton held jointly with Margaret his 
wife in Hamme one messuage, and it is worth per annum bd. 
There are there 70 acres of land, the approvement whereof is worth 
per annum \os. Also 4 acres of meadow, worth per annum 4^. 
Of rent of assize there is per annum 14J. at the 4 principal terms. 
The services of the customars are worth per annum %s. : to hold to 
the said Richard and Margaret his wife, and to Richard son of the 
said Richard de Polhampton, and to the heirs of the said Richard 
son of Richard for ever. The said messuage, land, meadow, rent, 
and services are held of the Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk by the 
service of zos. per annum, and suit at court for all service. 

Richard de Polhampton died 15th September in the said year; 
Richard, son of the said Richard de Polhampton, is his next heir, and 
is now aged six years. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 11 Edward II, No. 29. 



Inquisition made at Wyntreslewe Crumwell before Ralph 
de Monte Htrmerii, keeper of the lord's forest on this side the 
Trent, on Friday in the feast of St. Augustine, 11 Edward II [13 17], 
by Sir Walter Gacelyn, keeper of the forests of Claryndon and 
Grovele in co. Wilts, fohn de Penle, rider \_equitatorem~\ of the said 
forests, John de Puttone, Richard de Tudeworth, and Henry Burry, 
foresters of the said forest of Claryndon, John^ de Boclaunde and 

William Warde, verderers of the forest of Claryndon, John de 
Langeford, Stephen . . . , Walter de Thacham, Stephen Huloun, 

William le Porter, Thomas de Tarente, John de Catie/ord, John Pykot, 
John de . . . , John Henry, Nicholas Hulomi, and Stephen le 
lyonge, regarders and other freemen of the forest of Claryndon 
joined with them, . . . de Pulton, surveyor {landinarium) of 
the forest of Claryndon, and by Philip de Fra?npton, sub-forester 
of the said forest, John de Shaldeham . . . , of the said 
forest ; and by Henry atte Hulle, locum tenens of Sir Thomas 
de Chaumcombe, forester of the fee of the said forest of Grovele ; 
and by . . . Quyntyn, forester of the fee of the forest of 
Grovele, John Mahen and Ralph atte Mulle, verderers of the forest 
of Grovele, and by . . . Wodebergh, forester of the said forest ; 

William Prykemere, agister of the forest of Grovele ; Robert Gerald, 
Robert Denny ij), Robert Cole, William Norman, Walter Lumbard, 

WILTS INQ.— VOL. H. 27 

2 8 



4 1 B Wiltshire 

Robert Peyrecourt, Thomas atle More, Thomas Dauboney, William 
S . . . , William Pycard, and William Ky . . . ot, freemen 
within the forest of Grovele ; Thomas Cosyn, Robert Gereberd, John 
de . . . , William le Duyn, John de Harnham, John son of 
Walter de Langejord, John de KyngesmuU, William Sauvage, John 
le Cosyn {?), John Rickeman, Adam Barielot, Ralph atte Halle, Alan 
de Shadewell, William Elys., Nicholas Chartre, John Gylmore, Roger (?) 
le Ferour, and John de Farley, freemen dwelling outside the said 
forests, sworn and charged upon their oath whether the Prioress of 
Aumbresbury, Baldwin de Stowe, and Thomas Cheyndut, and all their 
tenants of the manor of Bereford St. Martin ought to have, and if 
the said Prioress, Baldwin, and Thomas, and the predecessors of the 
said Prioress, and the ancestors of the said Baldwin and Thomas, 
lords of that manor, and their tenants of the said manors have 
always hitherto from time immemorial been wont to have, common 
of pasture for all their beasts and flocks in the King's forest of 
Grovele in co. Wilts. All say that the said Prioress o{ Aumbresbury, 
and the said Baldwin de Stowe and Thomas Cheyndut, and the pre- 
decessors of the said Prioress, and the ancestors of the said Baldwin 
and Thomas, lords of that manor, and their tenants of the said 
manor have always from time immemorial been wont to have, and 
of right ought to have, common of pasture for all their beasts and 
flocks in the King's forest of Grovele in co. Wilts, except goats 
and sheep in all time of the year, and pigs over one year old in the 
forbidden month. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., ii Edivard II, No. 68. 



Cn^titta^ tDife of i^eter De la ^tane. 

InC[UlSltlOn. taken before the King's escheator, ist March, 
12 Edward II [131 8], by the oath ai John Dalewhay, Thomas 
Maudut, John Adam, Geoffrey Maiidut, Robert Swotyng, John le 
Parker, Adam Bonetone, Robert Russel, Philip le Cok, Adam le Foghel, 
Ralph atte Mull, and Adam Russel, who say that 

Cristina, who was the wife of Peter de la Stane, held no lands or 
tenements in his demesne as of fee on the day that he died in 
CO. Wilts of the King in chief, or of any other, but the said Cristina 
held on the day that she died, in the said county, the third part of 
the manor of Fishertone next Codeford in dower by the death of 
Peter de la Stane, formerly her husband, which said manor is held 
of Nicholas Poynsz by knight's service : to which said third, part 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 419 

there belonged one house with the third part of a garden, the 
profit whereof is worth per annum \id. There are there of the 
same dower 36 acres of arable land, which are worth per annum 6j., 
price of the acre rd. There is there half an acre of meadow, which 
is worth per annum %d. There is there a pasture of the said dower, 
which is worth per annum y. \d. There are there 3 customars, 
each of whom holds one messuage and half a virgate of land, who 
pay per annum in common i\s. at the 4 principal terms of the year 
for rents and services equally. There are there 2 cottars holding 
at will, who pay per annum is. at the said terms equally. 

Peter son of James de Nortone, and Margery wife of William 
Saffrey and Cristina wife of Antony de Bidik, daughters oi Peter de 
la Stane, are the next heirs of the said Peter de la Stane and Cristina 
his wife : the said Peter is aged 1 8 years, the said Margery 30 years, 
and the said Cristina .... 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward II, No. 27. 



Edward, by the grace of God, etc., to John de Blomvill, his 
escheator in cos. Norfolk, Suffolk, etc. 

We, willing to be certified as to the true value of the knight's 
fees and advowsons of churches which were o{ John Dargenteyne, 
deceased, who held of us in chief in your bailiwick on the day that 
he died, and which by reason of his death are taken into our hands, 
command you diligently to cause those fees and advowsons to be 
extended, etc. 

Witness ourself at Gloucester 23rd January, in the 12th year of 
-our reign [1323]. 

Hertford, Wilts, etc. 

Inquisition taken at Baldok, before John de Blomvill, the 
King's escheator in cos. Norfolk, Suffolk, etc., i6th February, 
17 Edward II [1323], by the oath of Hugh de Langrave, John de 
Langrave, etc., who say that 

John de Waudlitiglon held the manor of Waudlington of Johfi 
Dargenteyne on the day that he died, etc. 

And that Warin, son of Warin de Bassingbourne, of Wynepol, held 
the manor of Cheldrington in co. Wilts of the said John Dargenteyne 
on the day that he died, by the service of one knight's fee, and the 
said manor is worth per annum iocs. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward IF, N'o. 43. 



420 Wiltshire 



Latorence tie ^ancto apartino. 

Inquisition made before the King's escheator, lotb 
October, 12 Edward II [13 18], of the lands and tenements 
which were oi Lawrence de Sancto Martino in the county of Wilts on 
the day that he died, by the oath q{ John de Langeford, John de 
Grimstede, Thomas de Havenebere, Thomas Thurslayn, John Dalewhei, 
John Pkot, Ralph de Molendino, William Bruion, John le Frere, John 
Henry, Waller de Thacham, and Simon de Ode, who say that 

Lawrence de Sanclo Martino held in his demesne as of fee on 
the day that he died the moiety of the township of Istgrimstede of 
the King in chief as parcel of the moiety of the barony of Duene 
by knight's service. 

There is there of rent of assize per annum, forthcoming from 
certain free tenants there, 24J. ^d. at the 4 principal terms of the 
year by equal portions. There is there a certain grove, the profit 
whereof is worth per annum 5^. 

The said Larvurence also held on the day that he died 2 parts 
of the moiety of the manor of Duene of the King in chief by 
barony. There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden, 
which are worth per annum zs. There are there 60 acres of arable 
land, which are worth per annum i^s., price of the acre id., and 
3 acres of meadow, which are worth per annum 3J., price of the 
acre iid. There is there a certain wood, and the profit thereof as 
in herbage and underwood is worth per annum half a mark. There 
are there 7 acres of several pasture, which are worth per annum \\d., 
price of the acre zd. There is there of the rent of free tenants at 
the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions zos. z^d. There 
are also there 8 customars who pay per annum 32J. at the said 
terms, and they ought to work in mowing and carrying the field,, 
and that work is worth altogether i6d. The pleas and perquisites 
there are worth per annum 3J. 4.d. 

Joan and Sibilla, daughters of the said Lawrence, are his next 
heirs apparent. The said Joan is aged 6 years, and the said Sibilla 
2 years. 

Sibilla, who was the wife of the said Lawrence, is pregnant. 

Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward II, No. 49. 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem. 421 



LatDtence De ^ancto flpattino. 

Inquisition made before the King's escheator, 12th 
October, 12 Edward II [13 18], of the lands and tenements 
which were of Lawrence de Sancto Martina in the said county on the 
day that he died, by the oath of John Dalewhy, Thomas Thurstayn, 
Philip Cok, Roger le Parkere, Robert Russel, John de Depford, Ralph 
de Molendino, Adam Russel, William Kudenhot, Thomas de Havenehere, 
Simon de Ode, and Hugh de Nippred, who say that 

Lawrence de Sancto Martino and Sihilla his wife held jointly on 
the day that the said Lawrence died the manor of Ubetone of the 
Abbess of Wilton by the service of the fourth part of one knight's fee. 

There is there a capital messuage with a garden which is worth 
per annum half a mark; one dovecote which is worth per annum 
4J. ; and a certain mill which is worth per annum zos. 

There are there 324 acres of arable land, of the which 104 acres 
are worth per annum 52J., price of the acre 6</., and 220 acres are 
worth per annum 55^., price of the acre 3^. Also 21 acres of meadow 
which are worth per annum 42^., price of the acre 2J. The several 
pasture there is worth per annum half a mark, and the pasture in 
common \s. There are there four free tenants who pay per annum 
at the 4 principal terms of the year by equal portions loj. Also 
6 virgators who pay per annum 30J. at the said terms equally, and 
for their works from the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 
up to the feast of St. Michael %s., viz. each of them ltd. Also 
12 semi-virgators who pay per annum 30^'. at the said terms equally, 
and for their works from the feast of the Nativity of St. John the 
Baptist up to the feast of St. Michael %s., viz. each of them %d. 
Also 5 cottars who pay per annum 7^. 6</. at the said terms equally. 
The pleas and perquisites with chersete there are worth per annum 
1 5 J. There is chersete of 5 tenants, viz. of each of them one cock 
and 2 hens, price \d., price of the cock zd. 

The said Lawrence and Sibilla also held jointly on the day that 
the said Lawrence died the manor of Weredore of the Abbess of 
Wilton by the service of the fourth part of one knight's fee. 

There is there a certain capital messuage with a garden which 
are worth per annum ioj., and a dovecote which is worth per 
annum zs. There are there 140 acres of arable land, whereof 
80 acres are worth per annum 26J. %d., price of the acre 4^., and 
60 acres of land are worth per annum 15^., price of the acre 3^. 

2 8 * 



422 Wiltshire 

Also 7 acres of meadow which are worth per annum 14J., price of 
the acre 2s. Also 24 acres of several pasture which are worth 
per annum 5J., price of the acre i^d. There is there a certain 
grove which is worth per annum as in underwood and pasture 6^'. %d. 
There are there 3 semi-virgators who pay per annum bs. at the 
4 principal terms of the year by equal portions, and they ought to 
work every working day for one hour, and the work of each is 
worth for the work of one hour of the day a farthing. The pleas 
and perquisites there are worth one year with another 3^. \d. 

The said Lawrence and Stbilla also held jointly on the said day 
the moiety of the manor of Stupel Langeford of the King in chief 
by knight's service. 

There is there a certain capital messuage which is worth per 
annum 2s. There are there 60 acres of arable land which are 
worth per annum 15J., price of the acre ^d. Also 5 acres of 
meadow which are worth per annum loj., price of the acre 2s. 
The profit of the pasture there is worth per annum zs. There 
is there of the rent of the free tenants at the 4 principal terms 
of the year equally 12s. ^d. Also of the rent of 5 virgators, 
2 semi-virgators, and 2 cottars per annum at the said 4 terms 42^-. 
by equal portions. 

The pleas and perquisites there are worth one year with 
another 4J. 

Joan and Sibilla, daughters of the said Lawrence, are his next 
heirs. The said Joan is aged 6 years, and the said Sibilla 2 years. 

Sibilla, who was the wife of the said Lawrence, is now pregnant. 
Chan. Inq. p.m., 12 Edward 11, No. 49. 



InC[UlSltlOn taken at Devizes before the King's escheator^ 
on Thursday next after the feast of St. George, 12 Edward II 
[13 1 8], by the oath of Robert Plukenet, Roger Mamiyon, Simon 
Renahud, Roger de Upton, Hugh Drueys, Richard Drueys, Roger 
Chaundeler de Ryngesbourn, John Maundevylle, John Lovel, John 
de Lylleshull, Henry Vigers, William Costewode, Edmund Breyvill, 
Waller Hurdy, William Beyshyn, and Philip Serle, who say that 

John Paynel was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day that he 
died of 2 parts of the manor of Litleton in the hundred of Kings 
Roghebergh, which said manor is held of the King in chief by the 



Inquisitiones Post Mortem, 423 

service of 20J. to be paid yearly at the castle of Devizes at the feast 
of St. Michael. 

There is there one messuage with a garden, the easement 
whereof with the pasture is worth per annum zs. There are there 
79 acres of arable land, and the acre is worth per annum 3^. Also 
4^ acres of meadow, and they are worth per annum 4^. 6^/. 
Also 2 acres of wood, the pasture whereof is worth per annum bd. 
There is there one free tenant, and he pays per annum at the 
4 principal terms 6j. Also 19 natives, and they pay per annum for 
all services £(i. There are there 13 acres of common pasture, and 
the acre is worth per annum zd. The pleas and perquisites are 
worth per annum 40a'. 

T